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first_imgOne of the things we all love about Phish is their ability to surprise. That effect was in full force on this day in 2000, when the band took the stage at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont, Illinois. The Vermont four-piece opened the show with the debut of “Come On Baby, Let’s Go Downtown,” a tune originally written by Danny Whitten (the original guitarist for Crazy Horse) and made famous by its appearance on the 1975 Neil Young album, Tonight’s The Night. To date, after its debut on September 23rd, 2000, Phish has only ever played it one other time—a week later during the group’s performance at Verizon Wireless Amphitheater on October 5th of the same year.Fortunately, you can watch a video of Phish debuting their cover of “Come On Baby, Let’s Go Downtown” below.[Video: romanb99]“Come On Baby, Let’s Go Downtown” was built through to a nicely jammed rendition of “The Moma Dance,” which you can also watch below.[Video: romanb99]After “Frankenstein”, the band broke into a first-set “Halley’s Comet” for the ages, taking the funky tune past the fourteen-minute mark with some excellent jamming. Dig the video below.[Video: telekinetica]The video footage from Phish performance at the Allstate Arena back in 2000 continues with this great first set-closing version of “Stash.”[Video: telekinetica]You can also check out the full audio from the show, courtesy of fromtheaquarium. The band really dug deep in the second half, playing “Tweezer” with a rare die-down ending and also taking “Piper” deep into funk jam territory. The full stream and setlist can be seen below.Setlist: Phish | Allstate Arena | Rosemont, IL | 9/23/00Set 1: Come On Baby, Let’s Go Downtown[1] > The Moma Dance, Frankenstein, Halley’s Comet > Fee > StashSet 2: Birds of a Feather, Tweezer[2] > NICU > Scent of a Mule, Fast Enough for You, Piper > Character ZeroEncore: Sleeping Monkey > Tweezer Repriselast_img read more

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — A new report by Better Business Bureau (BBB) says sweepstakes, lottery and prize schemes are devastating victims financially and emotionally with ever-evolving methods. These frauds concentrate on seniors, targeting them by direct mail, cold calling, social media, even text messages and smartphone pop-ups. BBB warns consumers to be on guard against these serious and pervasive frauds and their perpetrators.The report – “Sweepstakes, Lottery and Prize Scams: A Better Business Bureau Study of How ‘Winners’ Lose Millions Through an Evolving Fraud” – notes these scams bilked $117 million out of half a million Americans and Canadians in 2017 alone, with actual victims and losses likely numbering much higher. BBB received 2,820 sweepstakes and lottery scam reports in Scam Tracker in 2017, with a median loss of $500. Seniors are the most frequent target and suffer the largest losses by far in these scams, which the report found commonly originate in Jamaica, Costa Rica and Nigeria.The report recommends stronger law enforcement efforts on three fronts — in Jamaica, which has seen an upswing in violence related to lottery fraud profits; in the U.S., where law enforcement is urged to step up extraditions and prosecutions of overseas fraudsters operating in the U.S.; and globally, as law enforcement agencies worldwide are encouraged to take steps toward holding deceptive mailing organizations accountable and stopping fraudulent mail. It also urges Facebook and other social media platforms to take steps to weed out fake, fraudulent profiles and make fraud reporting easier.Among the Indianapolis area victims is a man in his late 40s who was contacted via social media by someone claiming to work for the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. He was told he had won a prize, but had to first complete a form and submit payment for the $3,500 delivery fee. Being on disability, the man submitted the payment in installments through wire transfer. While he did not pay the full amount, he did end up losing $3,100.Among the report’s key findings:The majority of lottery or sweepstakes scam victims are between 65 and 74 years old. Among that age group, people who recently experienced a serious negative life event, and who expect their income in the near future to remain steady or decline, are even more likely to be victimized.Sweepstakes/lottery fraud can strike through many channels – phone calls, text messages, pop-ups on a smartphone’s Internet browser, social media and mailings.In 2017, 2,820 individuals reported sweepstakes and lottery scams to BBB Scam Tracker. These reports show a median loss of $500, with wire transfer as the most frequent method of payment.Jamaica is a major source of “cold calls” to victims who are told they have won money. Although similar calls come from Costa Rica, the scam has had a major impact in Jamaica, where the amount of money generated by lottery fraud has resulted in gang wars between rival fraud groups, leading to a dramatic spike in violence. More than 95 percent of reported fraud in Jamaica involves lottery or sweepstakes scams.The report was written by C. Steven Baker, BBB International Investigations Specialist. Baker is the retired director of the Federal Trade Commission’s Midwest Region.In his role with BBB, Baker is working with an alliance of five BBB’s, including the St. Louis office, in analyzing and reporting on some of the most pervasive fraud issues that impact American consumers. Studies on puppy scams, tech support scams, and romance scams he authored were met with worldwide media coverage.BBB offers the following tips for consumers to avoid being caught in lottery or sweepstakes fraud:True lotteries or sweepstakes don’t ask for money. If they want money for taxes, themselves, or a third party, they are most likely crooks.Call the lottery or sweepstakes company directly to see if you won. Publishers Clearing House (PCH) does have a sweepstakes but does not call people in advance to tell them they’ve won. Report PCH imposters to their hotline at 800-392-4190.Check to see if you won a lottery. Call the North American Association of State and Provincial Lotteries at 440-361-7962 or your local state lottery agency.Do an internet search of the company, name, or phone number of the person who contacted you.Law enforcement does not call and award prizes.Talk to a trusted family member or your bank. They may be able to help you stay in control of your money in the face of fraudster pressure.last_img read more