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first_imgThe 15th annual Bayou Rendezvous took over the Howlin’ Wolf on Friday, May 5th, after the official festivities for New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival had come to a close for the day. It was a massive musical affair, with nine bands performing across the two stages. The event is a perfect example of how charity and music go hand-in-hand, with a portion of the event’s proceeds going to the New Orleans Musician’s Clinic & Assistance Foundation, a charity that helps secure health care for the city’s many musicians.As is the Jazz Fest way, Bayou Rendezvous this year was jam-packed with special collaborations, sit-ins, and all-star groups that can only be brought together when hordes of world-class musicians flock to New Orleans during this time of year. One of the supergroup’s topping the Bayou Rendezvous bill this year was the Bayou Rendezvous All-Stars, tapping noted musicians Johnny Vidacovich (Astral Project), Ivan Neville (Dumpstaphunk), Oteil Burbridge (Dead and Co., Allman Bros.), Kofi Burbridge (Tedeschi Trucks Band), Stanton Moore (Galactic), and Eric McFadden (P-Funk, Anders Osborne) to round out its lineup.Building an “All-Star” band is more than just grabbing the best players available who happen to know the same handful of songs and throwing them onstage together. Matching playing styles and personalities is a big part of the equation. Luckily for all involved, the drumming duties were carried out by Galactic‘s Stanton Moore and ‘Nawlins drum legend and elder statesman Johnny Vidacovich. Their symbiotic style of play is born from countless hours of jamming between them, and this familiarity created an almost family-like vibe as the base of the performance.Not that Allman Brothers and Dead & Co bassist Oteil and Tedeschi Trucks Band’s organ and flute wizard, Kofi Burbridge, needed anymore of a familial connection—with the two brothers together, the energy skyrocketed. Add Ivan Neville, a man whose surname is one of the most evocative and synonymous with the sound of the New Orleans, and you have a supergroup sprung from the deepest of shared roots. This focus on family—musical and blood—fits perfectly with the charity beneficiaries of the evening, the New Orleans Musician’s Clinic & Assistance Foundation.Since 1988, the Foundation has helped the under and uninsured part of the city’s extensive musician population get the health care they so desperately need. Dedicating yourself to making music for the world to enjoy can be rewarding, but not as lucrative as one would hope. By providing a safety net to New Orleans’ many musicians, the clinic allows them to keep doing what they love (and sharing it with us grateful folks), and also provides a sense of well-being to their families as well.As such, when given the chance to help out other struggling musicians, players come in a little sharper and ready to give their all. Before we get to the sharing portion of the piece, we wanted to remind you that the caring part of this article never stops. The Clinic is always in need, and donations can be made HERE to this wonderful and necessary charity that keeps the music we love for nice and healthy.We’ve already seen some lovely photos from the Bayou Rendezvous from Chad Anderson and some fun videos from Dr. Klaw‘s set from our own Rex Thomson, but now let’s check out a few high lights from the epic set from this collection of top talent of The Bayou Rendezvous All-Stars giving their all for the twin causes of funk and family.“Get Back>Sing A Simple Song”“Will It Go Round In Circles”Jamlast_img read more

first_img CUNA wrote in support of NCUA’s proposal to raise the residential appraisal threshold earlier this month, as CUNA originally requested the rule to give credit unions parity with banks. Several credit union leagues around the country also wrote to NCUA in support of the proposal.Specifically, NCUA proposed to raise the amount for which residential appraisal threshold would be increased to $400,000 (from the current $250,000).CUNA, in its comment letter, noted the change would “reduce regulatory burden for credit unions, resulting in both transaction cost and time savings for credit unions and their members.”League comments on the proposal include: continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrcenter_img CUNAlast_img read more

first_img The plan, intended to replace the existing one published in 2005, aims to present “simpler and more precise definitions” of the six pandemic phases and groups them to emphasize planning and preparedness considerations. The draft also defines “post-peak” and “possible new wave” phases. The agency says it is revising its guidance to reflect scientific advances and increased practical experience in responding to human and avian influenza since 2005. Events have included the development of national antiviral stockpiles, the approval of some H5N1 vaccines, the launch of efforts to create an international H5N1 vaccine stockpile, advances in understanding of past pandemics, and more knowledge of possible control strategies, the WHO said in a July statement on the drafting process. The WHO is seeking comments on the draft and plans to publish the final version in December. Interested people can request a copy through the WHO Web site; to file comments, they must fill out a “declaration of interest” form. Comments must be submitted by Nov 3. Components of preparedness, responseThe guidance lays out five components of preparedness and response to describe actions in each phase of a pandemic: (1) planning and coordination, (2) situation monitoring and assessment, (3) communications, (4) reducing the spread of disease, and (5) ensuring continuity of healthcare provision. This list differs slightly from the list in the existing guidance: (1) planning and coordination, (2) situation monitoring and assessment, (3) prevention and containment, (4) health system response, and (5) communication. Oct 24, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) has drafted a revised pandemic influenza preparedness plan that updates the definitions of pandemic phases and puts more emphasis on the social and economic effects of a global epidemic, among other changes. The WHO plans to publish a collection of “supporting technical documents” with the final guidance, one of which will cover non–health sector preparedness. Others will cover disease-control measures, outbreak communications, surveillance, laboratory preparedness, and healthcare surge capacity. Tools such as checklists, training manuals, and a handbook for the public will also be published. Changes in the phase definitions are clearest for phases 1, 5, and 6, with lesser changes in the other phases. In the existing guidance, phase 1 is defined as a time when, though no new flu viruses have been found in humans, a flu virus that has caused human infection “may be present in animals,” but the risk of human infection is considered low. In the new draft, the phase 1 definition states simply: “No animal influenza virus known to have caused infection in humans has been identified in animals.” All of society should prepareAnother feature of the draft guidance is an emphasis on the principle that all of society, not just the health sector, should prepare for a pandemic. “In the absence of early and effective planning, societies may experience social and economic disruption, significant threats to the continuity of essential services, lower production levels, distribution difficulties and shortages,” it states. Similarly, the new phase 6 definition uses a specific geographic criterion, this one signaling intercontinental spread. Whereas the existing guidance defines this phase only as “increased and sustained transmission among the general population,” the draft defines it as featuring a virus that “has caused clusters of disease in at least two of the following geographical regions: Africa, Asia, Europe, Americas, and Oceania.” Phase 3 as defined in the current guidance—the phase the WHO puts us in now—is described as “human infections with a new subtype, but no human-to-human spread, or at most rare instances of spread to a close contact.” In the draft, this changes to: “An animal or hybrid animal-human influenza virus has caused sporadic cases or small clusters of disease in people but has not resulted in human-to-human transmission sufficient to cause community level outbreaks.” Also, practical experience in pandemic planning and in responding to avian flu outbreaks in the past 3 years has led to “a greater recognition that pandemic preparedness planning requires the involvement of both health and non-health sectors,” the agency said. For example, it says, “If the electricity and water sectors are not able to maintain services, there will be grave implications for the ability of the health sector to function.” However, “It is important to stress that the phases do not represent an epidemiological prediction,” the document states. It is possible, in other words, to have early specific threats that do not lead to a pandemic; it is also possible for the first outbreaks of a pandemic to occur in such a way as to skip some intermediate phases. Many of the recommended activities within the various components are the same or similar between the existing and draft guidance, but some differ. For example, for containment efforts during phase 4, the draft advises affected countries to “engage in rapid containment operations in collaboration with WHO and the international community,” among other steps. The corresponding section in the existing document does not mention rapid containment operations, saying only that countries should “implement appropriate interventions identified during contingency planning, and consider any new guidance provided by WHO.” The guidance links the various phases to various responses by countries. However, it says the decision on when to start production of a pandemic vaccine will not be dictated by the phase: “The decision to recommend a switch to pandemic vaccine production will be made independently of phase changes. The ability to act promptly in such situations will depend entirely on access to viruses shared through the WHO Global Influenza Surveillance Network (GISN), highlighting the paramount importance of international cooperation in this area.” The guidance says that “non-health” sectors of society should plan for the likely impacts on businesses, schools, and other organizations; establish policies to be used during a pandemic; allocate resources to protect employees and customers; and educate employees. For phase 5, the draft guidance uses a more specific geographic criterion than the existing document. The existing guidance speaks of larger case clusters but ones still confined to a localized area, suggesting that the virus is not yet fully transmissible. The draft document defines phase 5 as featuring a virus that “has established human-to-human transmission in two or more non-contiguous countries in one geographical region.” A phase is not a predictionEach phase is linked to an “estimated probability of a pandemic” in the draft guidance, unlike in the current version. The probability is listed as “uncertain” for phases 1, 2, and 3, and rises for the remaining steps. The draft guidance for the first three phases incorporates the WHO’s existing recommendations on several topics: actions by individuals and households; actions at the societal level, including international travel measures; antivirals and other pharmaceuticals; and vaccines. The draft also defines three more phases after phase 6, none of which is numbered: the “post-peak period” (cases in most countries have dropped from peak levels), a “possible new wave” (flu activity is rising again), and the “post-pandemic period” (cases have returned to the normal range for seasonal flu). The vaccine section notes that the WHO currently makes no recommendations “either supporting or opposing the stockpiling of new influenza vaccines by a country for use either prior to a pandemic or during its early stages [prepandemic vaccines]. A well-matched pandemic vaccine will only be available after the pandemic influenza virus is identified.” While granting that the socioeconomic effects of a pandemic may be major, the WHO says it will measure pandemic severity on the basis of direct health impacts: “Societal and economic effects may be highly variable and dependent upon multiple factors (including the effects of the media and the underlying state of preparedness). WHO will instead assess pandemic severity based on primarily measurable effects on health.” Pandemic phasesThe draft guidance has six main pandemic phases, like the 2005 version. “However, the grouping and description of pandemic phases have been revised to be simpler, more precise and based upon verifiable phenomena rather than inference,” the document states.last_img read more

first_imgOur very own Alex Iwobi’s goal vs BenficaWatch and Enjoy pic.twitter.com/BkLkETmF0Y— Based On Logistics (@Iam_Abdulaxis) July 29, 2017Benfica(Cervi, Salvio) 2-5 (Walcott X2, Lopez OG, Giroud, Iwobi)Arsenal Sead – coquelin – Walcott = goal!! pic.twitter.com/Pf63kZOlqM— Kicks&tackles (@KNT_football) July 29, 2017Benfica(Cervi) 1-1 (Walcott)Arsenal Arsenal ran an entertaining show in their Emirates Cup opener against Benfica, thumping the Portuguese side 5-2.Despite going behind to Franco Cervi’s deflected opener in the 11th minute, Arsenal took control through Theo Walcott’s eight-minute brace, before Eduardo Salvio restored parity for Benfica on the 40-minute mark to end the first half 2-2. Benfica(Cervi) 1-0 Arsenal “@ArsenalTSN: Arsenal’s fourth goal, scored wonderfully by Giroud, assisted by Nelson. [@ArsenalGoals] pic.twitter.com/lyN6u7y5Xw“— Valoli Group (@ValoliGroup) July 29, 2017Benfica(Cervi, Salvio) 2-4 (Walcott X2, Lopez OG, Giroud)Arsenal Goal!! Eduardo Salvio ties it up for Benfica at minute 39 {2-2} ⚽️⚽️? @Arsenal 2-2 @SLBenfica great game!! #AFCvBEN #EmiratesCup pic.twitter.com/qJdMibVq5E— Med Goha (@Med_Goha) July 29, 2017Benfica(Cervi, Salvio) 2-2 (Walcott x2)ArsenalThe Gunners turned the screw in the second half to earn a 5-2 victory, Lisandro Lopez’s 53rd-minute own goal was followed by a superb finish by Giroud and a smashing strike from Alex Iwobi.Lisandro Lopez with an embarrassing own goal to help Arsenal gain the lead. Arsenal 3-2 Benfica pic.twitter.com/yD0RZwGMFy— Big Nothing (@BigNothingPod) July 29, 2017Benfica(Cervi, Salvio) 2-3 (Walcott X2, Lopez OG)Arsenal Video Credit: Twitter.comRelatedSevilla Striker Mocks Arsenal’s Champions League AbsenceJuly 31, 2017In “England”Lazio Roma vs AS RomaJune 30, 2017Similar postCarabao Cup: Big Guns Pass Third Round TestSeptember 20, 2017In “England” Typical WengerBall.Walcott’s 2nd goal pic.twitter.com/V9M1Tljkfz— Arsenal FC (@FFArsenal) July 29, 2017Benfica(Cervi) 1-2 (Walcott x2)Arsenallast_img read more