Tags : 爱上海龙凤爱后花园松江

first_imgKolkata: A person has reportedly drowned while bathing in the sea at Digha on Friday afternoon. He was rescued by the ‘nuliahs’ and rushed to Digha State General Hospital (DSGH) where the attending doctor declared him brought dead.According to sources, one Shankar Deb, aged around 44 years, had gone to Digha with his family on Thursday. He had rented a room at a hotel located in New Digha. On Friday afternoon, he went to Old Digha along with his wife and five-year-old daughter Atrika. There, he consumed alcohol and went to Ghat number 1 to bathe in the sea. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataWhen he was walking towards the sea with his daughter on his shoulder, his wife tried to stop him as he was not able to walk straight since he was in an inebriated state. But Shankar did not bother to listen. When he reached near the water, some ‘nuliahs’ and civic volunteers saw him and asked him not to venture into the sea. They tried to reach Shankar but before they could get to him, he reportedly went into the water with Atrika. Just after that, a huge wave came and landed on both. As the force of the wave was very strong, both Shankar and Atrika were beginning to get washed away. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateSeeing them drowning, the ‘nuliahs’ ran to their rescue. To save his daughter, Shankar threw Atrika towards the ‘nuliahs’ who got hold of her. Just after saving his daughter, the ‘nuliahs’ went in the water with safety measures to save Shankar. After a few minutes, Shankar was rescued and taken to the DSGH where he was declared brought dead by the doctor. An Unnatural Death (UD) case has been lodged. It is not clear whether Shankar had died due to excessive consumption of alcohol or by drowning. To identify the cause, sleuths are waiting for the autopsy report. According to police sources, despite repeated requests and warnings, Shankar did not bother to listen to either his wife or the security persons and ventured into the sea in an inebriated state that proved very risky and he ended up paying with his life.last_img read more

first_imgA lot of things make working in tech difficult. Technical debt is one of them. Whether you’re working in-house or for an external team, you’ve probably experienced some tough challenges when it comes to legacy software. Most people have encountered strange internal software systems, a CMS that has been customized in a way that no one has the energy to fathom. Working your way around and through these can be a headache to say the least. In this year’s Skill Up survey, we found that Technical debt and legacy issues are seen by developers as the biggest barrier to business goals. According to 49% of respondents, old technology and software is stopping organizations from reaching their full potential. But it might also be stopping developers from moving forward in their careers. Read the report in full. Sign up to our newsletter and download the PDF for free. Technical debt and the rise of open source Arguably, issues around technical debt have become more pronounced in the last decade as the pace of technical change has seemingly increased. I say seemingly, because it’s not so much that we’re living in an entirely new technical landscape. It’s more that the horizons of that landscape are expanding. There are more possibilities and options open to businesses today. Technology leadership is difficult in 2018. To do it well, you need to stay on top of new technologies. But you also need a solid understanding of your internal systems, your team, as well as wider strategic initiatives and business goals. There are a lot of threads you need to manage. Are technology leaders struggling with technical debt? Perhaps technology leaders are struggling. But perhaps they’re also making the best of difficult situations. When you’re juggling multiple threads in the way I’ve described, you need to remain focused on what’s important. Ultimately, that’s delivering software that delivers value. True, your new mobile app might not be ideal; the internal CMS you were building for a client might not offer an exemplary user experience. But it still does the job – and that, surely is the most important thing? We can do better – let’s solve technical debt together It’s important to be realistic. In the age of burn out and over work, let’s not beat ourselves up when things aren’t quite what we want. Much of software engineering is, after all, making the best of a bad situation. But the solutions to technical debt can probably be found in a cultural shift. The lack of understanding of technology on the part of management is surely a large cause of technical debt. When projects aren’t properly scoped and when deadlines are set without a clear sense of what level of work is required, that’s when legacy issues begin to become a problem. In fact, it’s worth looking at all the other barriers. In many ways, they are each a piece of the puzzle if we are to use technology more effectively – more imaginatively – to solve business problems. Take these three: Lack of quality training or learning Team resources Lack of investment in projects All of these point to a wider cultural problem with the way software is viewed in businesses. There’s no investment, teams are under-resourced, and support to learn and develop new skills is simply not being provided. With this lack of regard for software, it’s unsurprising that developers are spending more time solving problems on, say, legacy code, than solving big, interesting problems. Ones that might actually have a big impact. One way of solving technical debt, then, is to make a concerted effort to change the cultural mindset. Yes, some of this will need to come from senior management, but all software engineers need to take responsibility. This means better communication and collaboration, a commitment to documentation – those things that are so easy to forget to do well when you could be shipping code. What happens if we don’t start solving technical debt Technical debt is like global warming – it’s happening already. We feel the effects every day. However, it’s only going to get worse. Yes, it’s going to damage businesses, but it’s also going to hurt developers. It’s restricting the scope of developers to do the work they want to do and make a significant impact on their businesses. It seems as though we’re locked in a strange cycle where businesses talk about the importance of ‘digital skills’ and technical knowledge gaps but ironically can’t offer the resources or scope for talented developers to actually do their job properly. Developers bring skills, ideas, and creativity to jobs only to find that they’re isn’t really time to indulge that creativity. “Maybe next year, when we have more time” goes the common refrain. There’s never going to be more time – that’s obvious to anyone who’s ever had a job, engineer or otherwise. So why not take steps to start solving technical debt now? Read next 8 Reasons why architects love API driven architecture Python, Tensorflow, Excel and more – Data professionals reveal their top tools The best backend tools in web developmentlast_img read more

first_img Share Posted by Monday, August 22, 2016 Those familiar with Canadians’ travel habits to the Hawaiian Islands know that the 2016 peak travel season is upon us, and with a dollar that has made travel to Hawaii more of a challenge this year, there may be no better time than the present for agents to brush up on their Hawaii selling skills.Here to help is the Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau’s (HVCB) Official Hawaii Destination Specialist Program. This tiered program will help you sell Hawaii like you never have before while at the same time providing the opportunity to gain exclusive Hawaii benefits. And if you sign up and complete Level 1 of the Official Hawaii Destination Specialist Program through Travelweek’s Learning Centre (travelweeklearningcentre.ca) before the end of 2016 you will also be eligible to win a five-night stay at the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani.The Official Hawaii Destination Specialist Program is a self-guided course that delivers in-depth knowledge and insights into the Hawaiian Islands as well as effective sales tips to transform agents into booking pros. Best of all, the program is free, online and mobile-friendly so agents can take it anytime, anywhere and at their own pace.During the course travel professionals will learn uncommon details about the destination’s six distinctive islands, how to match different travellers’ profiles with their perfect Hawaiian vacations and practical tips for cross selling and upselling Hawaii to maximize revenue. This expertise is an important element in building credibility with clients – which results in increased bookings, greater commission and more repeat business.Once Level 1 of the program is complete, agents will then earn Hawaii Destination Specialist designation and gain exclusive benefits, including consumer referrals, specialist only-webinars, one-year subscription to HAWAII MAGAZINE, access to ePostcard Marketing Tool, use of the Hawaii Destination Specialist logo, personalized emails for Hawaiian Islands-Bound Clients.Canadian agents who go through Travelweek’s Learning Centre to become a Destination Specialist will also be entered into a draw for a five-night stay at the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani (agents must complete the program by Dec. 31, 2016).American graduates of the Hawaii Destination Specialist Program had this to say about their experience:“I discovered several new ways to sell Hawaii,” said Patti Lehman, luxury travel advisor, The Travel Agent, Inc. “Each island’s program was informative, user-friendly and easy-to-follow. I found I was able to retain the information more easily.”“The course gives you a fresh insight on what Hawaii is all about. I have been able to convince clients who are already set to go somewhere else…to consider Hawaii instead,” said Rebecca Gaerlan, MCC, owner, A Plus Travel.Beyond the Destination Specialist designation, agents can also become a specialist for a specific island – or all six of them – to achieve Destination Expert status. There’s even a Master Specialist designation upon completion of on-island training. The further agents advance their education, the greater the benefits, including priority ranking on gohawaii.com’s consumer referral tool.On top of the Official Hawaii Destination Specialist Program, agents will also find a host of other tools at their fingertips on HVCB’s website designed specifically for travel professionals, including Island resource pages, What’s New Section: Island Updates, Hawaiian cultural toolkit, Hawaiian language audio dictionary, media centre with library of videos and images, activities and attractions directory, festival and events directory, Explore Hawaii Interactive Travel Guide, downloadable marketing templates, posters and maps, Expressly For Agents e-newsletter and wholesaler listings.Visit agents.gohawaii.com. To access the Official Destination Specialist Program visit travelweeklearningcentre.ca. Tags: Hawaiicenter_img No better time to become a Hawaii Destination Specialist Travelweek Group << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more