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first_img Photographs Projects Gresham Street House / Jackson Teece ArchDaily CopyHouses, Renovation, Houses Interiors•Brisbane, Australia Area:  198 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Houses Photographs:  Christopher Frederick JonesSave this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesRecommended ProductsWindowsAir-LuxSliding Window – CurvedWindowsSolarluxSliding Window – CeroMetallicsKriskadecorMetal Fabric – Outdoor CladdingDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Curved Hinged Door | AlbaText description provided by the architects. This re-creation of a family home, tailored to its occupant’s lifestyles, was realised through careful consideration of layout and context. Gresham Street House is an example of vernacular architecture, the architect and Director of Jackson Teece, Daniel Hudson lived there for 6 years before taking on the redesign. Ultimately, he has taken an existing “Queenslander” and shaped the design to create a home that acts as the epitome of shelter in a harsh climate.Save this picture!Scheme“Internally it was almost the opposite of what it should be. It was around the wrong way. So the main objective was to reconfigure the layout, the program of the house, without changing any of the wall locations.” – Daniel Hudson, Jackson Teece Director.Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesThe retention of the existing masonry, coupled with a pragmatic and performative design defined the spatial arrangement and material selection. Passive sustainability and design principles resulted in reduced waste, minimising the carbon footprint and embodied energy. The house can be opened up in summer to purge heat and closed down to cocoon its occupants in the winter. The addition of a flexible indoor/outdoor pavilion type space further supports an energy-efficient design and provides a large communal family space with a connection to the pool and landscape.Save this picture!Floor plansThe redesign of the floor plan responds directly to the site’s orientation and context. The living spaces which were located on the southwest of the plan are now connected to the garden and have become the heart of the home. Relocating these functions into a pavilion at the rear of the house provides a more appropriate response to the context and provides a space for family activities and entertaining.Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesThe design carefully considered solar access and control. The pavilion addition faces north, featuring angled timber blades to shade the east and west façades. Modeling determined the blade’s angle, eliminating direct solar penetration during the summer, with full sun penetration in winter. Galleries of louvers are oriented to encourage cool air flow from the pool and the cooling bay breeze from the east, while high positioned louvers allow heat to escape.Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesEfficiency in use of materials, such as the re-purposing of porcelain and stone slab off-cuts, required pre-planning and careful overseeing of manufacture to ensure reduced waste. Considered selection of plantation timbers, inclusion of rainwater tanks for garden irrigation and installation of a solar array was also undertaken to limit this project’s short and long-term environmental impacts.Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesA new secure timber batten entry annex flanks the existing eastern façade, allowing the house to be left open to freely ventilate, the entry stair doubles as an internal access to the lower level resulting in reduced spatial impact on floor space. It also shades the masonry from direct sun moderating internal temperature.Save this picture!Section + ElevationThe family now benefit from a house that responds to their daily lives; the sequence of leaving for school or work and equally returning home, a common family recreation space, but also alternate spaces that can be shut down for privacy or to get away.Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesVisual and physical connection to landscape and open space is a recurring theme in the design, contributing to a subtropical living experience. Close collaboration with the structural engineer resulted in large spans and efficient bracing, contributing to achieving the feeling of spaciousness within the pavilion and an unobscured aperture to the external landscape. The design provides a private and serene home which connects with the external environment in an inner-city setting.Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesA new secure timber batten entry annex flanks the existing eastern façade, allowing the house to be left open to freely ventilate, the entry stair doubles as an internal access to the lower level resulting in reduced spatial impact on floor space. It also shades the masonry from direct sun moderating internal temperature.Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesThe family now benefit from a house that responds to their daily lives; the sequence of leaving for school or work and equally returning home, a common family recreation space, but also alternate spaces that can be shut down for privacy or to get away.Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesVisual and physical connection to landscape and open space is a recurring theme in the design, contributing to a subtropical living experience. Close collaboration with the structural engineer resulted in large spans and efficient bracing, contributing to achieving the feeling of spaciousness within the pavilion and an unobscured aperture to the external landscape. The design provides a private and serene home which connects with the external environment in an inner-city setting.Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick JonesProject gallerySee allShow lessKanoko Building / EASTERN Design OfficeSelected ProjectsCitizenM Bowery / Concrete + Stephen B. Jacobs GroupSelected Projects Share “COPY” Australia “COPY” Save this picture!© Christopher Frederick Jones+ 22Curated by Fernanda Castro Share 2016 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/905670/gresham-street-house-jackson-teece Clipboard Gresham Street House / Jackson TeeceSave this projectSaveGresham Street House / Jackson Teece ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/905670/gresham-street-house-jackson-teece Clipboard CopyAbout this officeJackson TeeceOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentRenovationInterior DesignResidential InteriorsHouse InteriorsBrisbaneAustraliaPublished on November 12, 2018Cite: “Gresham Street House / Jackson Teece” 12 Nov 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogShowerhansgroheShowers – RainfinityGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ GeometricPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® Premium SeriesMetal PanelsTECU®Copper Surface – Patina_VariationsBeams / PillarsLunawoodThermowood Frames and BearersMembranesEffisusFaçade Fire Weatherproofing Solutions in Design District Project LondonSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylight Ridgelight in Office BuildingSwitchesJUNGLight Switch – LS PlusCurtain WallsRabel Aluminium SystemsSpider System – Rabel 15000 Super ThermalWindowspanoramah!®ah! Soft CloseWoodAustralian Sustainable Hardwoods (ASH)American Oak by ASHChairs / StoolsOKHADining Chair – BarnettMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Architects: Jackson Teece Area Area of this architecture project Year: last_img read more

first_imgPrint The late Jason CorbettThe family of slain Limerick man Jason Corbett have said they are deeply shocked and disappointed, after his wife and father in law, Molly and Thomas Martens, were granted a full retrial charged with his murder.Mr Corbett’s body was found with multiple injuries inside his adopted home in North Carolina in 2015.His wife Molly Martens along with her retired FBI agent father were both found guilty of murdering the Limerick father of two following a 2017 trial.Prior to the murder trial Ms Martens had lost a protracted legal battle in the US courts with Mr Corbett’s sister Tracey Corbett Lynch and her husband David Lynch, for custody of Mr Corbett’s children Jack (now 16) and Sarah (now 14).Molly and Tom Martens were jailed for between 20-25 years after a jury convicted them of second degree murder.The jury found the daughter and father had beaten Mr Corbett to death while he slept in his North Carolina home on August 2, 2015.There was evidence Mr Corbett was drugged and beaten about the head with a brick and a baseball bat, and that he sustained crushing head injuries after he had died.The accused pair claimed they acted in self defence. The court heard the father and daughter had no visible injuries on the night of the murder.Mr Corbett married Ms Martens in 2011 after she had worked as a nanny to Jack and Sarah a number of years after their mother, and Mr Corbett’s first wife, Margaret Fitzpatrick, passed away after suffering an asthma attack.Mr Corbett’s murder trial heard that he had been preparing to relocate to Limerick with his children after difficulties arose in his marriage to Ms Martens.It was heard that Mr Corbett became increasingly concerned over his wife’s mental state.This Friday the North Carolina Supreme Court ratified a Court of Appeal decision that both accused should have a re-trial after it was deemed their ability to argue self defence at their 2017 trial had been unfairly hindered.They had also argued statements given by Jack and Sarah Corbett to social workers which the Martens believe would help their case should have been allowed as evidence in the murder trial.Reaction from Jason Corbett’s family in his native Limerick was one of deep disappointment and disbelief.Tracey Corbett Lynch said her family “are so disappointed and distraught that the Supreme Court of North Carolina has decided to grant a retrial to Tom and Molly Martens”.Ms Corbett Lynch tweeted that Mr Martens and his daughter Molly “admitted killing our beloved Jason – a father, a brother, a son and a loyal friend”.She said her beloved brother “is dearly missed by all who knew and loved him”.Ms Lynch said they have put their trust in God and would work to help prosecutors convict Molly and Tom Martens for a second time.It could be 2022 before a retrial is heard. Linkedin NewsRetrial granted over death of Limerick man Jason CorbettBy David Raleigh – March 13, 2021 459 Email WhatsAppcenter_img Advertisement Twitter Facebook Previous article#NewMusic: Culla x Dylan Flynn and The Dead PoetsNext articleCarbery Shines As Munster Have Too Much For Scarlets At Windswept Thomond Park David Raleighlast_img read more

first_img bankruptcybrooklynInvestment Sales David Umansky of Civic Builders and 720 Livonia Ave in Brooklyn (Photos via Google Maps, Civic Builders)Civic Builders, which finances and builds school buildings for charter school networks, purchased a 28,000-square-foot school building at 720 Livonia Avenue in New Lots for $11.5 million. David Umansky, CEO of Civic Builders, signed for the buyer, limited liability company Civic Saratoga.The building was last purchased for $4.9 million in 2015 by two limited liability companies formed by controversial real estate figure Chaskiel Strulowitz (also known as Cheskel Strulovitch). Civic Builders bought the building at auction after a lender initiated bankruptcy proceedings against Strulowitz in 2019.A 2017 lawsuit accusing Strulowitz of a Ponzi-type scheme is in arbitration, records show. Brownstoner connected him to an affordable housing project in Bushwick called Knickerbocker Lofts.Crain’s reported in 2012 that Strulowitz began buying northern Brooklyn properties more than 20 years ago, leasing a three-story former loudspeaker factory on the Williamsburg waterfront in 1998 and converting it into 46 loft apartments, only to lose his 13-year lease when it expired.The Livonia Avenue deal was the only investment sale recorded last week in New York City between $10 million and $30 million, although a parcel of land adjacent to the LaGuardia Marriott hotel sold for $17 million as part of a $100 million-plus deal for the hotel itself. In the week prior, two such sales were recorded, totalling $34.2 million.Contact Orion Jones Share via Shortlink Full Name* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinkcenter_img Email Address* Tags Message*last_img read more