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first_imgAbbeyfeale company getting back to work Facebook TAGSAbbeyfealeCllr John SheahanCllr Liam GalvinCllr Seamus BrowneFine GaelHealth Service Executive (HSE)Limerick City and County CouncilMunicipal District of Newcastle WestReilig Íde Naofa cemeterySinn Fein Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin WhatsApp Reilig Íde Naofa Cemetery in Abbeyfeale, which has only around 20 graves left.THE HEALTH Service Executive (HSE) have asked for further testing to be carried out at a proposed site for a new cemetery in Abbeyfeale.At this Wednesday’s Newcastle West Municipal District meeting, Limerick City and County Council Senior Executive Engineer Robert Gallagher said that concerns were raised about soil conditions at the site on Clash Road. Further testing was needed during winter months and hoped these tests would be carried out sometime this November.Testing will also be carried out at interim sites and a location at the rear of the convent beside is to be tested as well.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up With around 20 graves left at Reilig Íde Naofa cemetery in Limerick’s second biggest county town, Fine Gael councillor Liam Galvin stressed the need for swift action.“I don’t know if people realise the seriousness of this issue. We are in real deep trouble,” he told the executive.“I don’t see that anything has changed in the five years we have been talking about this. We still need a graveyard!”His party colleague John Sheahan agreed, saying that the provision of a new graveyard must be expedited as quickly as possible. If we keep discussing it one thing is certain — we’ll have no graveyard. We need to put a deadline on this,” he said.Sinn Fein councillor Seamus Browne complimented the council on its progress to date and felt they now had more options than previously.“The community in Abbeyfeale have expressed their opinion on the need to be looking at more sites,” he added.by Alan [email protected] Twitter Emailcenter_img €1.5 million boost for five County Limerick towns from Rural Regeneration and Development Fund Sarah’s winning recipe to keep cabin fever at bay NewsLocal NewsFurther tests needed at Abbeyfeale graveyard siteBy Alan Jacques – November 9, 2017 3736 Abbeyfeale water supply gets the all clear New role for Cllr John Sheahan Previous articleLimerick business awards nominees shortlistedNext article#BREAKING Concern growing for man missing in Limerick Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Abbeyfeale’s Munster Football success can inspire any team Printlast_img read more

first_imgGOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-mail: [email protected] Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php From the Editors of E/The Environmental Magazine Dear EarthTalk: I came home today to yet another set of phonebooks at my front door. I feel they are a great waste of paper, especially in this electronic age. How can I stop getting these books? Better yet: How can we get the phone companies to stop making them? — Bill Jones, via e-mail Many of us have little or no use for phonebooks anymore. While such directories are helpful for that occasional look-up of a service provider or pizza place, consumers and businesses increasingly rely on the Internet to find goods and services. Directory publishers usually do make their listings available online nowadays, too, but the books are still money-makers for them as prints ads fetch top dollar even though their effectiveness is waning and much harder to track. According to the nonprofit YellowPagesGoesGreen.org, more than 500 million phone directories—nearly two books for every American—are printed and distributed every year in the U.S., taking with them some 19 million trees. Upwards of 1.6 billion pounds of paper are generated to produce the books from these felled trees, while 7.2 million barrels of oil are churned through in creating them (not including the gasoline used for local deliveries). Producing the directories also uses up 3.2 billion kilowatt hours of electricity and generates 268,000 cubic yards of solid waste that ends up in landfills (not including the books themselves, many of which eventually end up in landfills in areas where recycling is not available or convenient). Unfortunately, there is no centralized way for consumers to opt-out of receiving the big books like the National Do Not Call Registry for telemarketing. Most individual yellow and white page publishers have “no deliver” lists they can add you to, but they will not be held accountable if the books show up anyway. The YellowPagesGoesGreen.org website will find your local/regional directory pages publishers and ask them not to deliver on your behalf. The site warns, though, that there are no guarantees with this either. For their part, directory publishers insist they have made great strides in recent years to operate in an environmentally responsible manner. The Yellow Pages Association (YPA) and the Association of Directory Publishers (ADP) have collaborated on formal guidelines calling for source reduction in the production of directories, environmentally sensitive manufacturing practices and enhanced recycling programs. About 90 percent of industry members have adopted the guidelines so far. Examples in practice include the use of water soluble inks and recycling-friendly glues, not to mention forsaking the use of virgin trees in their books (many books are made from recycled old phonebooks, mixed with scrap wood; see a previous column that discussed this: www.emagazine.com/view/?3651). Because of widespread and increasing use of the Internet, many sources of information—from newspapers and magazines to newsletters and, yes, directories—are forsaking print for online placement. So it is really just a matter of time before phone directories follow that lead. In the meantime, asking to be removed from the delivery list of your local directory publisher can only help to hasten that inevitability. CONTACTS: YellowPagesGoesGreen.org, www.yellowpagesgoesgreen.org; Yellow Pages Association (YPA), www.ypassociation.org; Association of Directory Publishers (ADP), www.adp.org.last_img read more

first_imgPGGM has boosted its investments in Chinese logistics, committing a further $144m (€106m) to a strategy managed by The Redwood Group.The Dutch pension fund asset manager has now invested $270m in the strategy – following an initial €95m investment in 2012 – on behalf of the PGGM Private Real Estate fund.Redwood is targeting Chinese logistics on behalf of the fund in a “develop and hold” approach.It will be able to deploy up to $560m when taking into account a $10m co-investment and leverage, PGGM private real estate senior investment manager, Thijs Schoenaker, told IPE sister publication IP Real Estate. “We feel Chinese logistics property still has much to offer,” he said.“Stock is very limited. Economic growth, urbanisation and the growth of consumption and e-commerce mean demand is still strong.”Redwood, he added, expanded its Chinese operations in the past two years as well as its Singapore-based fund management platform.The firm, Schoenaker said, strengthened its investment processes, integrating ESG factors.PGGM has also committed to Redwood’s Japan Logistics Fund, with Redwood growing its Japanese operations.Schoenaker said, despite concerns over prospects for the Chinese economy, he did not expect a “hard landing” and that PGGM would continue to invest in China.“We are aware it’s slowing down,” he said. “However, the growth is becoming more sustainable over the long term.“The central government is transforming the economy from being export and investment-driven to consumption driven.“Logistics is one of the sectors that will benefit from that, and this investment will contribute to the Chinese economy and the creation of jobs.”PGGM, he said, remained confident in China’s retail sector – a “real long-term business case”.Since 2006, it has invested $600m in a portfolio of 37 malls including offices and residential elements as part of mixed-use schemes via the CapitaMalls China Funds.last_img read more

first_imgInformation is posted and updated on the California IMCA Speedweek Facebook page. Merced also opens the pits at 2 p.m., the drivers’ meeting is at 5:30 p.m. and racing is at 7 p.m.  MERCED, Calif. – California is the place Modified and Northern SportMod drivers will want to be, for the inaugural California IMCA Speedweek Aug. 10-15. All events are draw/redraw. Modified features pay $100 to start, Northern SportMod features $75, with IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, Shaw Race Cars Western Region and KMJ Performance State points, in addition to series points at stake.  Top five drivers in standings for each division receive point fund shares, in increments of $1,000, $400, $200, $100 and $100 for the Modifieds and $700, $300, $200, $100 and $100 for the North­ern SportMods.  At Petaluma, the gate opens at noon, the drivers meeting is at 3:45 p.m. and racing starts at 5:30 p.m.  And at Bakersfield, pits open at 3 p.m., the drivers’ meeting is at 5:30 p.m., hot laps are at 6 p.m. and racing gets underway at 7 p.m. Pit gates open at 1 p.m., the drivers’ meeting is at 5:30 p.m. and the first green flag flies at 7 p.m. sharp at Keller.  Pits open at 2 p.m. at Antioch. The drivers’ meeting is at 4 p.m. and racing is at 5 p.m.  Camping is allowed at each track but drivers and fans following Speedweek are reminded that no fires will be allowed. Several tracks will have Covid-19 forms to be filled out. Information about those forms is available from those tracks. IMCA Modifieds race for $1,000 to win their Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot qualifying fea­tures while Karl Kustoms Northern SportMods chase $750 top checks each night.  Nightly entry fee for drivers who did not pre-register is $20. Pit passes each night are $45. All events will be broadcast on Speed Shift TV and FloRacing.  The inaugural California IMCA Speedweek presented by Hoppes Motorsports opens next Mon­day at Placerville Speedway, then travels to Petaluma Speedway on Aug. 11; to Antioch Speed­way on Aug. 12; to Merced Speedway on Aug. 13; to Keller Auto Speedway in Hanford on Aug. 14; and to Bakersfield Speedway for the Aug. 15 finale. Placerville opens the pit gate at 11 a.m. with the drivers’ meeting at 4:45 p.m. and cars on the track at 5:15 p.m. last_img read more

first_imgBy Greg SoukupEAGLE, Neb. (Sept. 2) – The winners of the last two Sprint Nationals ran 1-2 in Friday’s qualifying fea­ture for this year’s IMCA EMI RaceSaver Sprint Car event.2014 champion Jack Dover led defending king John Carney II across the stripe in opening night action at Eagle Raceway. Chad Wilson and Shon Pointer completed the top four. One hundred and seventeen cars vied at the fourth annual Nationals.“I got a really good jump at the start from fourth. Actually, it was an awesome jump,” Dover said following the $700 checkers. “We set up for a slick track, and after they farmed the track it worked in our favor.”“I can’t wait for the Race of Champions and getting to start on the pole Sunday,” he continued “Hopefully we can bring home the win.”Dover led the opening lap with Andy Shouse, Luke Cranston and Wilson rounding out the top four. Dover pulled ahead to a straightaway lead by lap five.Lap eight saw Pointer move into fourth and two laps later, Wilson advanced to second. Carney jumped up to the third spot as Shouse fell back to fourth.Dover started encountering heavy traffic shortly after that, allowing his pursuers to close in. Dover ran high, low and wherever he had to in order to slice and dice around the lapped cars.With nine laps left, Carney advanced to second and moved in on Dover. Carney needed just three trips around the oval to move to within Dover’s push bumper but try as he may could never complete the pass.Saturday sees the second night of Sprint Car qualifying for Sunday night’s big show plus the Jake Ita Race of Champions.The main event pays a minimum of $2,500 and as much as $5,000 to win.Qualifying feature results – 1. Jack Dover, Springfield; 2. John Carney II, Lubbock, Texas; 3. Chad Wilson, North Richland Hills, Texas; 4. Shon Pointer, Grand Island; 5. Jason Martin, Lin­coln; 6. Andy Shouse, Mustang, Okla.; 7. Trevor Grossenbacher, Hickman; 8. Blake Robertson, Visilia, Calif.; 9. Adam Gullion, Lincoln; 10. Kevin Ramey, Fort Worth, Texas; 11. Luke Cranston, Holcomb, Kan.; 12. Jake Bukak, Arvada, Colo.; 13. Toby Chapman, Panama; 14. Gregg Bolte, Lincoln; 15. Dusty Ballenger, Harrisburg, S.D.; 16. Michael Day, Greenville, Texas; 17. Jaremi Hanson, Dillsburg, Pa.; 18. Tyler Russell, Abbott, Texas; 19. Gene Ackland, Martell; 20. Stuart Snyder, Waverly.Bubak won the “B” feature. Justin Melton, Flower Mound, Texas, won the “C” feature. Chris Kel­ley, Oklahoma City, Okla., won the “D” feature. Dan Satriano, Papillion, won the “E” feature. Doug Lovegrove, Waverly, won the “F” feature. John Ricketts, Burleson, Texas, won the “G” feature.Heat winners were Cranston, Robertson, Snyder, Carney, Ramey, Chapman, Ballenger, Martin, Dover, Wilson, Russell, Gullion, Grossenbacher and Pointer.Race of Champion heat winners were Ty Williams, Arcadia, Okla., Gullion, Robertson and Martin.last_img read more