Tags : 上海千花网坊1001上海千花网坊

first_imgHe hopped to Kitante Hill School for a year and then Ntanda College School. By Senior Four, he was again spotted while playing for Nsambya Old Timers by the Late Lukwago to join SC Villa. It was a dream come true the youngster.“I dint know that I would even ever get a chance to play but Coach Micho had seen great potential in me,” he says.It is here that Onyango started to get opportunities for the national team and under 20s. He, however, kept in school at Kampala Citizen’s College School and later joined Makerere University Business School until he dropped out to go play for St George in Ethiopia. Then he moved to South Africa for Super Sport Mpumalanga Black Ace and on to Mamelodi Sundowns. Onyango says he has matured in attitude as a player at Sundowns and achieved a lot. He is considering a coach career when he retires from active playing.He maintains that Ugandan football still lacks building foundations through soccer development academies that can help feed into the many soccer clubs.“It is good to mould and train our own material rather than just picking up mature players because clubs are demanding but also the passion of football must be worked on not only for the national team but for all clubs and teams,” he says. He is married to a longtime friend, Barbra Namubiru with whom they have four boys.Share on: WhatsApp Pages: 1 2 Kampala, Uganda | AGNES NANTABA | He is the only goal keeper and the first Ugandan to achieve the feat of African-based Footballer of the Year, to which he was voted in January 2016. The final tally saw Dennis Onyango pick up 252 votes, compared to 228 votes for second place Khama Billiat. He was also ranked as the tenth best goalkeeper in the world in list for 2016 compiled by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics. Even with such heights, 33 year old Mamelodi Sundowns and Uganda Cranes goalkeeper maintains a low and humble character.“I was raised in a very poor family so we earned most things through other people’s kindness,” he says, “Football is like any other occupation that requires discipline and respect of other people because you bank on their support.”At a young age, Onyango picked on goalkeeping after admiring then great goalkeeper Sadiq Wasswa who is now a coach. At the time, Onyango started playing for Sharing Youth Centre.He says although footballers are still famous today and support for the game is big, it is nothing like it was in the past.“Back then people would even leave work early to go and support their teams,” he says, “I also wanted to be famous.”When big teams like Express FC, KCCA, Villa and others were playing at Nakivubo Stadium in Kampala, Onyango would be among the thousands of spectators. Eventually his persistence paid off for then young goal keeper as football earned him bursaries and scholarships. In primary seven, Onyango left Railways Primary School and joined Greenland Islamic Primary School soon after being spotted as a talented sports boy. Sports soon affected his academic performance but he did not give up. His father, who saw education as the only path to success was always negative about the football, but Onyango had an uncle and mother who supported him.last_img read more

first_imgFacebook217Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Washington Department of Fish and WildlifeRazor clam diggers can return to various ocean beaches for a four-day opening beginning November 22.State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach before noon.The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and evening low tides:November 22, Thursday, 5:55 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, CopalisNovember  23, Friday, 6:36 p.m.; -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors, MocrocksNovember 24, Saturday, 7:20 p.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, MocrocksNovember 25, Sunday, 8:05 p.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, MocrocksDan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, recommends that diggers hit the beach about an hour or two before low tide for the best results.Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly in the fall when the best low tides come after dark, he added.WDFW has tentatively scheduled another dig for Dec. 6-9, pending results of future toxin tests. More information on planned digs can be found on WDFW’s razor clam webpage at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2018-19 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email ([email protected]). For more information, see http://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html.last_img read more

first_imgCLARK, ELLIOTT, LEPAROUX, MURPHY & STEVENS TO FACE NATIONWIDE VOTE OF THEIR PEERS ARCADIA, Calif. (Dec. 7, 2016)–Santa Anita Park has announced five finalists for the 2017 Santa Anita George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award, with the winner to be announced in February following a vote of jockeys nationwide.Veteran jockeys Kerwin Clark, Stewart Elliott, Julien Leparoux, Glen Murphy and Scott Stevens are the finalists for the prestigious trophy that has been presented annually by Santa Anita since 1950.One of the most coveted awards in all of racing, the Woolf Award, which can only be won once, is presented to a different jockey each year and it recognizes those riders whose careers and personal character earn esteem for the individual and the sport of Thoroughbred racing. The trophy is a replica of the life-sized statue of legendary jockey George Woolf, which adorns Santa Anita’s Paddock Gardens area.Woolf, who died following a spill on Santa Anita’s Club House turn on Jan. 3, 1946, was regarded as one of the top big-money riders of his era. Known affectionately as “The Iceman,” he was revered by his colleagues, members of the media and fans across America as a fierce competitor and consummate professional who was at his best when the stakes were high.The 2017 Woolf ballot, which will be distributed to active jockeys across the country, features five highly regarded riders who have plied their trade with honor and distinction.A Louisiana native who catapulted to national fame by winning the 2015 Kentucky Oaks at the age of 56, Kerwin Clark has long been respected by fans, horsemen and his fellow jockeys as a rock-solid rider who has conducted himself with a quiet distinction for more than 40 years.The son of a jockey who started at bush tracks in his native Louisiana, Kerwin Clark rode his first winner at Fairgrounds in New Orleans on Jan. 3, 1976. When asked about his Oaks victory, which came some 39 years later, he simply responded, “Best day of my life.”Through Dec. 2, Clark has 2,997 career wins.Born in Toronto, Canada and best known for his Kentucky Derby and Preakness victories aboard Smarty Jones in 2004, Stewart Elliott shows no signs of slowing down at age 51. Through Dec. 2, Elliott has amassed 4,707 wins. Regarded as a strong finisher who is also an outstanding judge of pace, Elliott shifted his tack on a full-time basis to Southern California in 2015 and has quickly established himself as one of the circuit’s top riders.The son of a jockey-turned trainer, French-born Julien Leparoux is a 10-time leading rider at Keeneland and is regarded as one of America’s elite young riders at age 33. Known as a “finesse” rider who enjoys tremendous success on turf, Leparoux, in a 2012 interview, said “I just try not to fight so much with my horses. I try to be gentle around their mouths.”Married to the late trainer Mike Mitchell’s daughter, Shea, Leparoux ranked 12th nationally by money-won last year and appears poised for superstardom at this stage of his career. A winner of seven Breeders’ Cup races, his most recent BC triumph came at Santa Anita on Nov. 5, when he won the Juvenile with trainer Mark Casse’s Classic Empire. Through Dec. 2, Leparoux had won 2,329 career races.An iconic figure at Sunland Park near El Paso, Glen Murphy broke his maiden at Sunland on Oct. 28, 1984, and he notched his 3,000th career victory at Zia Park on Dec. 18, 2015. Sidelined due to a fractured pelvis incurred in a paddock mishap in February, 2015, he rebounded quickly and enjoyed a fine year.A model of consistency, Murphy, 50, who is a graduate of Coronado High School in El Paso, has been among the nation’s top 100 jockeys by money-won every year since 2012. Through Dec. 2, he has 3,047 career wins.Long active in the support of his fellow riders, Scott Stevens has overcome life-threatening injuries to become one of America’s most highly respected jockeys in every respect. A member of the Canterbury Park and Idaho Racing Halls of Fame, Stevens is now within striking distance of 5,000 career wins, as he has amassed 4,616 victories through Dec. 2.At age 55, Stevens is currently based in Phoenix, Az., and he’s showing no signs of slowing down at Turf Paradise, as he booted home 118 winners over the 2015-16 meeting, good for his eighth “Turf” riding title.The older brother of Hall of Fame jockey Gary, Scott Stevens broke his maiden on May 30, 1976, at Le Bois Park in Boise, Idaho.For more information on the Santa Anita George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award, please visit santaanita.com.last_img read more