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first_img$40 for covered booth, approximately 10×10 feetThe Secondhand Safari will be on Saturday, May 2 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Set up for sellers will be on Friday, May 1 from noon to 10 p.m. The doors will be locked after set up Friday evening and security will be on site until the event opens Saturday.Representatives from Goodwill Industries will be on hand throughout the day on May 2 to accept donations (at their discretion), giving sellers the chance to donate any of their unsold items at the end of the day.For more information on the May 2 Secondhand Safari, or to reserve your booth, contact the Thurston County Fair Office at (360) 786-5453 or visit www.ThurstonCountyFair.org. Facebook213Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by The Thurston County FairPut a spring in your step and money in your wallet this season by reserving a booth for the annual Secondhand Safari at the Thurston County Fairgrounds.Saturday, May 2 will be a springtime extravaganza of buyers, sellers, swappers and traders, with over 1,500 visitors and 100 vendors in years past. Along with garage sale booths, the Secondhand Safari will also have educational booths, a free book and magazine exchange, entertainment, food, and more. This year, admission to Secondhand Safari is just $1 all day long, so get ready for bargain hunters galore!Not sure if you have enough gently used treasures for a booth? Secondhand Safari is a great opportunity to clean out the clutter and make a tidy sum for your family group, school club, church, charity or scouting club.Outdoor spaces and covered spaces for the May 2 event are available to anyone with gently used treasures to swap or sell. Call the Thurston County Fair Office at (360) 786-5453 to reserve your booth:$25 for outdoor booth, approximately 10×10 feetlast_img read more

first_imgOther awards included, Nathan Bernhardtwinning the Todd Matheson Memorial; Arjun Bhabra the Walter Clarkson memorial, Simon Forrester the Scotia Bank Achievement award; Jack Centrone the Alf Baker award; Nick Jenner the Marc Severyn memorial; Bantam Rep Ryan Kooznetsoff the Mike Laughton Sr. Award, Casey Harrison the R.C. Wright memorial; Kyle Patton the Barry Geist trophy; Midget Rep Hayden Klashinsky taking home the Brian Naka memorial; Taylor Harrison the Baker Street Esso Award and Liam Ingram and Andrew Falcone the Sarge Sammartino award for the top junior and senior officials, respectively.Leif Luttmer won the Ted Hargreaves coaching award while Sue Lakeman took the Robert Jeffs participation and dedication in advancing minor hockey in Nelson honour.Cash Nay (Atom), Rhett Hamilton (Peewee), Joe Davidson (Bantam) and Max Spielman ( Midget) were recipients of the Jackson Hole Three “A” award.Esso Medal of Achievement awards for most improve, most dedicated and most sportsmanlike went to Sawan Bhabra, Xavier Tinholt, Ryder Nash, Dane Jones, Nathan Jackman and Sebastien “Seabass” Conne-Corrent in the Atom Division.In Peewee House, winners included Wyatt Groenhuysen, Ryan Durocher and Jack Steer.In Peewee Rep, winners were Nathan Medeiros, Dakoda Fizzard, Reid Gerrand, Joe Laren, Karim Nephin and Matthew Lehr.Bantam House were Ethan Grill, Pax Arrowsmith and Jackson Cousins.Bantam Rep were Carson Pottle, Logan Smart and William McLeod.Midget House winners were TJ Winters, Charles Curiston, Noah Marsh, Ben Price, Kyle Patton and Mike Zarikoff.Midget Rep were Jake Laplante, Adam Volansky and Matthew Zwick. Hats off to the Nelson Leafs for winning the West Kootenay Minor Hockey Atom B Championship.However, this night was for all of the players as Nelson Minor Hockey culminated another successful campaign on the ice with its annual awards banquet Wednesday at the Selkirk College Tenth Street Campus.Once again the evening was led by former NHLer and Nelson Minor Hockey Association grad Mike Laughton.The Nelson native saluted the award winners along with giving the banquet goers a history lesson on the greats from Nelson Minor Hockey past.Laughton and Nelson Minor Hockey even went out of their way to invite a head table of guest that included past family representatives of the night’s major awards.The presenters took the players, parents and coaches on a trip down memory lane with many great stories from Nelson Minor Hockey history books.Some of the award winners included Grady Groenhuysen winning the Barry Pearce Memorial and Mitchell Erickson taking home the John Reichardt Memorial, both awards for Atom Player who displays team dedication, good sportsmanship, desire and love of the game.last_img read more

first_imgCLARK, ELLIOTT, LEPAROUX, MURPHY & STEVENS TO FACE NATIONWIDE VOTE OF THEIR PEERS ARCADIA, Calif. (Dec. 7, 2016)–Santa Anita Park has announced five finalists for the 2017 Santa Anita George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award, with the winner to be announced in February following a vote of jockeys nationwide.Veteran jockeys Kerwin Clark, Stewart Elliott, Julien Leparoux, Glen Murphy and Scott Stevens are the finalists for the prestigious trophy that has been presented annually by Santa Anita since 1950.One of the most coveted awards in all of racing, the Woolf Award, which can only be won once, is presented to a different jockey each year and it recognizes those riders whose careers and personal character earn esteem for the individual and the sport of Thoroughbred racing. The trophy is a replica of the life-sized statue of legendary jockey George Woolf, which adorns Santa Anita’s Paddock Gardens area.Woolf, who died following a spill on Santa Anita’s Club House turn on Jan. 3, 1946, was regarded as one of the top big-money riders of his era. Known affectionately as “The Iceman,” he was revered by his colleagues, members of the media and fans across America as a fierce competitor and consummate professional who was at his best when the stakes were high.The 2017 Woolf ballot, which will be distributed to active jockeys across the country, features five highly regarded riders who have plied their trade with honor and distinction.A Louisiana native who catapulted to national fame by winning the 2015 Kentucky Oaks at the age of 56, Kerwin Clark has long been respected by fans, horsemen and his fellow jockeys as a rock-solid rider who has conducted himself with a quiet distinction for more than 40 years.The son of a jockey who started at bush tracks in his native Louisiana, Kerwin Clark rode his first winner at Fairgrounds in New Orleans on Jan. 3, 1976. When asked about his Oaks victory, which came some 39 years later, he simply responded, “Best day of my life.”Through Dec. 2, Clark has 2,997 career wins.Born in Toronto, Canada and best known for his Kentucky Derby and Preakness victories aboard Smarty Jones in 2004, Stewart Elliott shows no signs of slowing down at age 51. Through Dec. 2, Elliott has amassed 4,707 wins. Regarded as a strong finisher who is also an outstanding judge of pace, Elliott shifted his tack on a full-time basis to Southern California in 2015 and has quickly established himself as one of the circuit’s top riders.The son of a jockey-turned trainer, French-born Julien Leparoux is a 10-time leading rider at Keeneland and is regarded as one of America’s elite young riders at age 33. Known as a “finesse” rider who enjoys tremendous success on turf, Leparoux, in a 2012 interview, said “I just try not to fight so much with my horses. I try to be gentle around their mouths.”Married to the late trainer Mike Mitchell’s daughter, Shea, Leparoux ranked 12th nationally by money-won last year and appears poised for superstardom at this stage of his career. A winner of seven Breeders’ Cup races, his most recent BC triumph came at Santa Anita on Nov. 5, when he won the Juvenile with trainer Mark Casse’s Classic Empire. Through Dec. 2, Leparoux had won 2,329 career races.An iconic figure at Sunland Park near El Paso, Glen Murphy broke his maiden at Sunland on Oct. 28, 1984, and he notched his 3,000th career victory at Zia Park on Dec. 18, 2015. Sidelined due to a fractured pelvis incurred in a paddock mishap in February, 2015, he rebounded quickly and enjoyed a fine year.A model of consistency, Murphy, 50, who is a graduate of Coronado High School in El Paso, has been among the nation’s top 100 jockeys by money-won every year since 2012. Through Dec. 2, he has 3,047 career wins.Long active in the support of his fellow riders, Scott Stevens has overcome life-threatening injuries to become one of America’s most highly respected jockeys in every respect. A member of the Canterbury Park and Idaho Racing Halls of Fame, Stevens is now within striking distance of 5,000 career wins, as he has amassed 4,616 victories through Dec. 2.At age 55, Stevens is currently based in Phoenix, Az., and he’s showing no signs of slowing down at Turf Paradise, as he booted home 118 winners over the 2015-16 meeting, good for his eighth “Turf” riding title.The older brother of Hall of Fame jockey Gary, Scott Stevens broke his maiden on May 30, 1976, at Le Bois Park in Boise, Idaho.For more information on the Santa Anita George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award, please visit santaanita.com.last_img read more

first_imgHALIFAX – A former Somali child refugee’s request to temporarily halt his deportation proceedings has been rejected by the Federal Court.Abdoul Abdi, who never got Canadian citizenship while growing up in foster care in Nova Scotia, was detained by the Canada Border Services Agency after serving five years in prison for multiple offences, including aggravated assault.Abdi’s lawyer, Benjamin Perryman, asked the Federal Court to pause deportation proceedings scheduled for March 7 while he pursues a constitutional challenge.But, in a decision released Friday, Justice Keith Boswell rejected the bid, saying there were no exceptional circumstances warranting inference by the Federal Court.“Mr. Abdi is extremely distressed by the result,” said Perryman in an interview Friday. “My biggest concern is that Mr. Abdi’s human dignity has been ignored to date.”Perryman had argued before the Federal Court that going ahead with a deportation hearing while the 24-year-old’s constitutional challenge is ongoing would cause irreparable harm.He said the Immigration Division hearing would inevitably lead to a deportation order given the circumstances of Abdi’s case, and that he would be stripped of his right to work and his right to health care.Working is one of the conditions of Abdi’s release to a Toronto-area halfway house, so he’s at risk of returning to jail if he’s unable to meet his conditions, Perryman noted.Perryman said the Immigration Division can only look at criminal records and citizenship status — Abdi was convicted of crimes and isn’t a Canadian citizen — and cannot look at other possible factors in his case, including international human rights law and the Charter, or the fact that Nova Scotia did not apply for citizenship on his behalf when he was in foster care.“In my view, none of these reasons advanced by the applicant persuades or compels the court in this case to order a stay of the pending admissibility hearing before the Immigration Division,” wrote Boswell.“The applicant’s concerns about procedural fairness or bias and the claimed inability to raise important legal or constitutional issues before the Immigration Division are not exceptional circumstances to bypass the administrative process.”Abdi’s constitutional challenge is still in its early stages.His case has become a rallying point for advocates who say it was wrong for the province to fail to apply for citizenship on his behalf.Perryman has said deporting Abdi to Somalia — a country to which he has no ties and where he would be unable to care for his Canadian-born daughter — would be unfair.Abdi was born in Saudi Arabia in 1993. After his parents divorced, his mother — fearing persecution if she returned to Somalia — fled to Djibouti, where the family obtained refugee status.His biological mother died in the refugee camp when he was four, and two years later he came to Canada with his sister and aunts.But shortly after arriving, the children were apprehended by the Nova Scotia government. Abdi’s aunt’s efforts to regain custody were rejected, and her attempt to file a citizenship application for the children blocked.Perryman has said if the division makes a deportation order, Abdi would not be deported immediately.Follow (at)Aly Thomson on Twitter.last_img read more