Archives : Jun-2021

first_imgHigh rise: Courtney Lawes wins a lineoutStar man – Courtney LawesHe went off midway through the second half, but that could well be down to the shift put in by the lock in those 56 minutes. He dominated the lineout, continually carried hard at the Pumas defence and put in several of his trademark crunching hits. He’s a hard man who is sure to come to the fore against New Zealand in seven days’ time.StatsEngland made 14 offloads to seven by Argentina, but conceded 11 turnovers to nine.Chris Ashton was England’s top metre-maker with 90 while Mike Brown was second wit 81 and Billy Vunipola third with 48. Argentina full-back Gonzalo Amorosino topped the charts, though, with 102.Tom Wood (12) and Chris Robshaw (14) were the only players on either side to hit double figures for their tackle count.Scorers Try time: Chris Ashton crosses for England’s third try against Argentina at TwickenhamBy Sarah Mockford at TwickenhamIn a nutshellAfter stumbling out of the blocks last week against Australia, England were in cruise control for the first half, scoring three tries to lead the Pumas 24-6 – but then they nodded off yet again.The opening 40 minutes were full of attacking intent, high tempo and an awareness of the space on the pitch, Owen Farrell guiding his team-mates around the turf like a circus ringmaster. Joe Launchbury, Billy Twelvetrees and Chris Ashton all scored tries – although there was doubt as to whether the winger grounded the ball before going into touch – and England were in full control.Come the second half, though, the intensity dipped and so did the accuracy, flippant passes not going to hand and turnovers commonplace. Argentina certainly stepped up a gear at the breakdown and England couldn’t get the quick ball they had enjoyed in the first 40, but there was also a lack of fluency to their own game.The All Blacks are in town next week and unless England can maintain their composure and intensity for the full 80 minutes, the visitors could run riot.Key momentHe’d received a fair amount of criticism this week, but Billy Twelvetrees showed some good touches early on and then crossed for England’s second try in the 22nd minute. The ball had come out from a five-metre scrum and England spotted the acres of space on the other side of the pitch, Twelvetrees receiving the ball and running hard for the line, barrelling over an Argentine defender before touching down. That made the score 17-6 and England’s dominance had been reflected on the scoreboard. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img England – Tries: Launchbury, Twelvetrees, Ashton, Morgan. Cons: Farrell 3, Flood. Pen: Farrell.Argentina – Pens: Sanchez 3, Bosch.last_img read more

first_img Initiating an orchestrated media campaign prior to any sporting contest represents a risky ploy. By giving bold predictions and belligerent messages, you are effectively beating an egg for others to catapult all over your face in the event of unsatisfactory results.Over recent weeks though, Eddie Jones has played a blinder. Bodyline references were backed up by blood-and-thunder attrition in Brisbane as England overturned Australia 39-28. Then, when his team travelled to Melbourne to seal the series, the theme was how desperate they were to clinch the series.The word punctuated just about every press conference and interview during the build-up to last Saturday. Its repetition bordered on monotony. But then the tourists stayed true to their term, turning out an epic defensive performance.Paul Gustard is famed for innovative techniques – wolves and snakes have been brought to Saracens sessions – and after the 23-7 victory at AAMI Park he revealed that Dale Wimbrow’s 1934 poem ‘The Guy in the Glass’ had been recited to the England squad with the purpose of encouraging deep introspection.Numbers only tell part of the story. Australia had 71 per cent of possession and 74 per cent of territory, but could not break a side that made 182 tackles. While not as lengthy as Wales’ 49-phase stand against Ireland 18 months ago, nor in fact their own rearguard of over 20 phases on the stroke of half-time in this game, one second-half spell of around two minutes defined England’s effort and demonstrated the following defensive principles as a collective:Work-rate and dynamismMutual trust and communicationTargeted disruption of key opponentsUnderstanding of when to blitz aggressively and when to drift passivelyAwareness of the referee’s viewpoint and law interpretationSound, streetwise disciplined decision-making in the tackle areaWith marginally less than half an hour remaining, Owen Farrell has just kicked a contentious penalty to put the Wallabies 13-7 behind. We join the action as Ben Youngs clears from the ensuing Australia restart.Reaction and restraintThe strike is weighted well. Chaser Anthony Watson is able to contest and the ball hits the ground before Israel Folau can reach it. However, the Waratahs  full-back latches on to the bounce and counters:Tracking Youngs’ kick allows us to appreciate England’s off-the-ball industry and reactions. Initially, Watson pursues with Mako Vunipola and Maro Itoje in the background:However, the Saracens forwards change direction rapidly as Folau gathers and bypasses Watson:Itoje’s pace in the wider channels proved to be extremely valuable throughout the match and here, he shuts down the carrier’s space quickly. Though Folau steps off his right foot……and pirouettes past the young lock……Mako Vunipola flies across to make a very robust tackle. Having been covering a potential kick return in the back-field, brother Billy Vunipola advances towards the tackle area:At the start of this year, the Saracens siblings were still the subject of jibes about their body composition. People still questioned their work-rate. Hopefully this series has finally killed off such lazy preconceptions. Certainly, this passage underlines the graft each of them gets through in each encounter.Despite the proximity of Tevita Kuridrani, Billy Vunipola shapes to attack the ball……but, with Dan Cole retreating into the defensive line alongside him, Billy Vunipola leans in and pushes off his brother Mako as Michael Hooper and Dane Haylett-Petty near the breakdown:On the microphone of referee Craig Joubert, you can hear Billy Vunipola saying “leave it, leave it” and the Saracen sashays right into the line, pushing Cole further out onto the openside. Meanwhile, Youngs starts organising as well. He tells Itoje to adopt the guard position on the openside.The upshot of Billy Vunipola’s canny decision not to contest is that Australia must commit three clearers to the ruck. Not including scrum-half Nick Phipps, there are four Wallabies tied up in this tackle, with only Mako Vunipola from England in the same breakdown:Most of the defensive line is set, although Cole is still sidestepping into place. As Phipps locates a three-man pod of forwards, there are spaces of about two metres between each England defender – as delineated by the dash between Billy Vunipola and Itoje.Adopting a four-point stance like a sprinter in the blocks, George Kruis, looks eager to burst off the line towards Ben McCalman:Sure enough, Kruis and Billy Vunipola blitz forward in a sort of pincer movement to make the tackle. In England’s system, individuals are trusted to shoot out of the line if they are confident of making the tackle. Therefore, it is no concern that Hartley and Cole are left behind.As McCalman is felled though, watch Hooper and Haylett-Petty retreating in a straight line from the previous ruck to give Phipps an outlet on the blindside. Splitting the field in this manner is a prime weapon against such aggressive defence:Fortunately, Itoje holds a position on the blindside as Phipps bounces back to his right. Scrum-half Ben Youngs also resists the urge to run around the corner, coming up into the line as his opposite number switches play:Haylett-Petty gets lucky with a ricochet, forcing Mike Brown and Youngs to make a scrambling cover tackle:From here, England are in survival mode, but remain calm. Brown recovers his feet almost immediately, dodging Phipps’ attempt to clear him out.Believing the ball to be out of the breakdown, Brown then edges around the ruck. Crucially though, he checks with Joubert before picking it up. Joubert makes it clear that Australia would be awarded a penalty, so Brown leaves everything alone.Meanwhile, Kruis, Cole and Hartley are back in the line:Defensive delayOn this phase, we see a major benefit of competing at the breakdown:Lock Sam Carter is the next Australian to carry. Look at the time on the clock when Kruis makes the tackle. Then, as Cole swoops towards the ball, note that four clearers are required to recycle possession:The tenacity, strength, size and technique of Cole means it takes six seconds for the ball to become available again. According to Prozone data, Australia averaged 2.7-second rucks during their 33-13 triumph at Twickenham during the 2015 World Cup.Such a delay means that when Phipps is next able to pass it out, England have set themselves.The tireless James Haskell and Kruis are next to make a double-hit on Toby Smith. Again, start the clock:Haskell and Kruis attempt to hold their opponent above the floor to form a maul, requiring Stephen Moore and Greg Holmes – the two remaining Wallaby front-rowers – to charge into the melee and attempt to force Smith to ground:They manage that, and Haskell is trapped on the wrong side in full view of Joubert, who had penalised him twice for precisely this in the first half.Demonstrating the organisation that can be done while defenders make it difficult for the attack to recycle, Robshaw calls Hartley towards him:With a mighty effort, Haskell hauls himself off the tackled player as Itoje arcs around into the left-hand guard position:This convinces Joubert not to penalise Haskell, although the ball comes free, ending a ruck that has lasted three seconds…As Bernard Foley scoops up, a hugely frustrated Phipps snaps at Joubert, making it clear that he believed Haskell to have moved the ball while on the floor:Itoje fells Foley……and once more Australia gravitate towards the ruck, with four joining it without a single Englishman to clear out:This allows the tourists to deal with the following two phases fairly easily. First Hartley and Robshaw bring down Scott Fardy……making a double-hit……with Hartley threatening the ball briefly as Hooper comes around the corner:Note that Mako Vunipola, who made the tackle on Folau at the start of this attack, is back at guard with Kruis spaced well to his right:Hooper is met by George Ford and Kruis but Australia are able to recycle quickly. England’s resources are now stretched, as Farrell (circled) indicates:This message is passed from out to in, with Jonathan Joseph… TAGS: Highlight At the double: Chris Robshaw and Dylan Hartley combine to stop Australia dangerman Israel Folau LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS We highlight the defensive principles that helped England land a phenomenal victory over Australia in the second Test. …and then Brown shepherding forwards into position:As a result, when Phipps releases his backs, hitting Folau at first receiver, England have plenty of men on their feet in the defensive line:They come forward as Folau throws a miss-pass to Samu Kerevi……before Jack Nowell and Farrell wrap up the Reds centre. Start the clock again:Nowell and Farrell hold up Kerevi for two seconds, forcing Carter and Mumm to hurl themselves into the tackle area:In the wake of a superb win, Gustard admitted that stalling Australia in contact had been an instrumental part of the defensive performance.Again, England’s players roll clear to appease the referee and only after seven seconds have elapsed can Phipps restart the attack:One-man blitzRobshaw and Itoje stop Moore on the next phase……and Foley now decides it is time to spread play, calling for the ball from Phipps with his team’s two most dangerous runners on the outside:The fly-half receives as the England line advances before sending Folau on an arc towards Ford’s outside shoulder, a very similar line to the one that brought a try in Brisbane.At this point, Watson makes the do-or-die decision to leave his wing and jam in hard:Leaving Haylett-Petty alone, the Bath man aims at Hooper. Watch Brown trying to cover the vast expanse on the right:Blindsided and possibly surprised by Watson’s pace, Folau does not throw a pass over the top. Instead, he holds on and collides with Hooper:England could have had a penalty for crossing or at least a scrum for accidental obstruction, but neither comes.Instead, Ford completes the tackle and Kuridrani clears out Watson. Billy Vunipola and Hartley arrive on the scene next……and, with the ruck over because Kuridrani has driven Watson beyond the ball, Hartley senses a chance to steal:He dives in with Rob Horne competing……and Australia only recycle because Horne collapses, sealing off the ball:Stopping the sourceHartley wriggles free as four Wallabies committ to the breakdown. Robshaw, prompted by Brown, then calls over Hartley to bolster the other side of the ruck:Kerevi is next to barrel forward, with Kruis, Mako Vunipola and Robshaw meeting him:Kruis and Mako Vunipola upend Kerevi and with Robshaw circling, Fardy and Mumm must support their colleague:As Cole fills in at guard, the Wallabies take out Robshaw……but again, the ruck is over when Robshaw is driven out the other side. Cole is free to attack Phipps – another tactic England used throughout:While Foley looks to organise the next phase with Horne, Phipps is quick enough to snatch the ball and dart away……however, Cole hauls him in:Billy Vunipola then has a sniff at the ruck amid the attentions of Foley and Horne……but, in exactly the same manner as he did at the beginning of this defensive set, the 23 year-old pulls away, staying on his feet……and directing Youngs towards the guard position him, with Brown filling in on the outside:Shouldering responsibilityHartley is the chief protagonist to keep an eye on here. Because Phipps is stuck in the ruck, Haylett-Petty steps up at scrum-half……and barges through Youngs.Fardy latches on, adding his weight to the carry:But, with Brown’s aid, Hartley just about drags down Haylett-Petty:Brown, Robshaw, Mako Vunipola and Billy Vunipola reach the ruck to ward off any further pick-and-gos.Over and outAustralia look back to the left, and their attack ends on its 10th phase:As carrier Mumm receives the ball, the England defensive line is loaded with enough bodies to envelop an isolated carrier:Sure enough, Cole and Kruis make a solid hit on the former Exeter Chiefs second-row:Robshaw swoops around and adopts a strong stance that Carter cannot shift, but look at Mako Vunipola in this final screenshot:This is not the kind of contribution that features in match statistics. Still, it epitomises the selfless industry of this defensive display as a whole. Latching on to Robshaw to galvanise his position over the ball and make him more difficult to move, Mako Vunipola is a big part of the turnover.Australia came again, but England held out, breaking their opponents’ spirit a little more with each rearguard until Farrell’s try won the series in the final moments. A final onslaught from the wounded Wallabies awaits in Sydney, but Gustard and Jones can be extremely confident in their defensive operation.last_img read more

first_img TAGS: The Greatest Players In 2011, at a gala dinner in Paris, a formidable foe from bygone years was inducted into the French Hall of Fame. Iain Milne, the famous Bear of Scotland, was that man.To give you some idea of how significant this is, Milne’s Test career overlapped with some of France’s most vicious scrummaging beasts: Paparemborde, Dubroca, Garuet and Vaquerin all saw Milne in action. They held him in very high regard…. and they certainly punched him enough times to show that.Milne received his nickname because he was a huge, immovable man, but he wasn’t always that size. At school he was much smaller but time spent working on the docks once his education was over saw the Heriot’s product develop incredible strength and bulk.A star of Scotland’s all-conquering 1984 Grand Slam side, he was singled out for special praise by the great Jim Telfer that season while his hooker Colin Deans later remarked: “He gave you the sure-fire feeling that the right-hand side of the scrum was going nowhere.”One of three brothers who all played for Scotland – David had a single cap at loosehead while Kenny was a hooker for Scotland and the Lions, and the three played one match together for the Barbarians – he also had undervalued ball skills. Milne went on the 1983 Lions tour of New Zealand but, despite being in superb form, wasn’t selected ahead of the great Graham Price. It was a pain he took with him into the 1984 Five Nations.His power would not always go unrecognised. At that same dinner in 2011, former All Black Steve McDowell – the loosehead who faced Milne in the 1987 World Cup quarter-finals and the opponent the Bear rated the highest – admitted that at the time, the Kiwis felt Scotland were the best scrummagers on the planet. Major teams: Heriot’s, HarlequinsCountry: ScotlandTest span: 1979-90Scotland caps: 44 (44 starts)Test points: 0center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As Milne was their anchor and key force, that is high praise indeed.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

first_img King Louis: No 8 Louis Picamoles is congratulated after scoring France’s third try from a scrum (AFP/Getty) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tries: Fickou, Vakatawa, Picamoles, Dulin. Cons: Lopez 4. Pens: Lopez 4.Sharp-shooter: Camille Lopez landed 20 points – his best individual haul in Test rugby (AFP/Getty)For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Colourful: France fans enjoyed seeing their team retain the Giuseppe Garibaldi Trophy (AFP/Getty)Missed tackles – Much of the damage is self-inflicted, with Italy’s missed tackles shocking for international standards. They made 104 tackles but missed 53 at Stadio Olimpico – the highest missed tackles figure since the 54 against the same opponents in Italy’s debut Six Nations campaign in 2000.Picamoles was able to shrug through three defenders straight off a scrum for his try and Vakatawa didn’t have a hand laid on him as he sauntered under the posts for what was effectively the killer blow after 47 minutes.STATISTICS25 – Number of offloads made by France. It’s the only way they know870 – Number of metres made by France – and they beat 53 defenders66% – Italy’s tackle success rate, compared to 93% by France16 – Number of carries made by Louis Picamoles, who also topped the individual tackle count with 1511 – Consecutive Tests in which Italy have scored a try. But they’ve also lost five straight Tests and 11 in a row in the Six Nations0 – Number of yellow cards conceded by France in this championshipItaly: E Padovani (L Sperandio 72); A Esposito, M Campagnaro (T Benvenuti 64), L McLean, G Venditti; C Canna, E Gori (G Bronzini 50); A Lovotti (S Panico 66), L Ghiraldini (T D’Apice 61), L Cittadini (D Chistolini HT), M Fuser (G Biagi 56), D Van Schalkwyk, B Steyn, S Favaro (M Mbanda 50), S Parisse (capt).Tries: Parisse, Esposito. Con: Canna. Pens: Canna 2.France: B Dulin; N Nakaitaci, R Lamerat (F Trinc-Duc 69), G Fickou, V Vakatawa (Y Huget 63); C Lopez, B Serin (A Dupont 72); C Baille (U Atonio 53), G Guirado (capt, C Tolofua 54), R Slimani (E Ben Arous 53), J Le Devedec (P Jedrasiak 58), Y Maestri, F Sanconnie, K Gourdon, L Picamoles (B Le Roux 72). TAGS: Highlight Italy came into the match buoyed by their unexpected success at Twickenham, where they thwarted England for long periods and avoided the heavy drubbing many predicted.Unfortunately, despite the boon of Sergio Parisse’s try from the first attack, it was to be the same old story for the Azzurri and they are now guaranteed their 12th wooden spoon in their 18 years of Six Nations rugby.After Gael Fickou’s excellent opener for France, from a move sparked by Brice Dulin’s adventurous run from near his own line, the visitors grabbed second-half tries from Virimi Vakatawa, Louis Picamoles and Dulin to secure their first-ever try bonus point and Guy Noves’s first away win in the championship. They now join Ireland on ten points with a round to play.WHAT’S HOTFrench back three – Brice Dulin was making only his second start since RWC 2015, Scott Spedding paying the price for those dropped up-and-unders in Dublin. It was the ideal game for the Racing 92 full-back, with the weather fair and a few less-than-nimble opponents to run at, but he certainly delivered. His ambition for the Fickou try was great to see and he was on hand to bag the bonus point in the final minutes.The southern hemisphere-born wings, Vakatawa and Noa Nakaitaci, also enjoyed themselves on a day when Italy were punished for not kicking the ball off the park.Free to run: Virimi Vakatawa enhanced his reputation as one of the world’s best wingers (Getty)Normal rules apply – It was pleasing to see Italy dabble only slightly in the no-ruck tactics that so dominated proceedings against England. Edoardo Gori was deployed as an occasional floating rover, darting round to France’s side whenever he sensed that no ruck, and therefore no offside line, had been formed.Few people want to see extensive use of such tactics, so let’s hope Italy continue to use them sparingly and instead focus on improving their core basics.Sergio Parisse – A shout-out for Italy’s captain on the day he equalled Brian O’Driscoll’s record for the most Six Nations matches as a captain – 41. He has soldiered on through defeat after defeat – 35 of them in those 41 games – and his performance levels rarely drop below excellent.Parisse marked the day with his 15th Test try. Not much went right for Italy but they seem to be taking their driving mauls up a notch, and their use of the mini maul in open play is a useful weapon.Fast work: Skipper Sergio Parisse scored Italy’s quickest-ever Six Nations try (Getty)WHAT’S NOTSecond-half capitulation – Italy were still in the match at half-time, trailing 16-11, but by the time Angelo Esposito crossed in the final play they had leaked 24 further points and the match was long since over as a contest.The Azzurri have now conceded 120 second-half points in this championship, scoring just ten, and it’s becoming an embarrassment. “They lose fitness, they lose concentration,” said TV commentator Shane Williams, probably as frustrated as the rest of us at the meek surrender. What’s hot and what’s not from Italy’s 2017 Six Nations match against Francelast_img read more

first_imgTwo tries from Henry Slade in the last quarter of this Six Nations match in Dublin secure England a famous win over Ireland LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Henry Slade scores brace as England beat defending champions IrelandHenry Slade scored two tries in ten minutes to seal England’s 32-20 Six Nations win over Ireland at the Aviva Stadium.The defending champions were the favourites for this first-round match in Dublin, but England put the hosts under pressure with their kicking game and were clinical when creating scoring opportunities in the second half to secure a bonus-point victory.The crucial score game in the 67th minute. England led 17-13 and from a scrum in the middle of the pitch, they opted to attack the blindside with Ben Youngs passing to Slade and the centre sending the ball out to Jonny May on the touchline.With Ireland’s defenders drawn to the threat of May’s pace and Slade highlighting the space in front of him, the winger kicked downfield and his team-mate had green grass in front of him to touch down.Referee Jerome Garces called in the TMO to check that Slade hadn’t been in front of May when the kick was made. It was tight but he wasn’t in front and the try stood.Watch the try here…Ten minutes later, Slade then added gloss to the victory by intercepting a Johnny Sexton pass in the Ireland 22. He fell over but retained possession, got up and stretched over the line. Slide show: Henry Slade scores the first of his two tries in Dublin (Getty Images) center_img England welcome France to Twickenham on Sunday with last year’s dismal Six Nations campaign a distant memory, while Ireland head to Scotland with hopes of back-to-back Grand Slams extinguished.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Related: Downtime with Henry SladeMay had got England off to a brilliant start by scoring a try within two minutes of the whistle blowing. Owen Farrell sent a miss-pass to Elliot Daly and, with a two-on-one advantage, the full-back sent May sprinting away for the corner.Watch that opening score here…England’s other try, much like in Paris the night before, came from an error by the hosts.Related: Huget howler gifts North a try in Wales’ comeback winDaly put through a kick and as a retreating Jacob Stockdale tried to gather the ball, he lost possession when he was tackled by Jack Nowell over the line and Daly touched it down for a try.last_img read more

first_img August 10, 2012 at 11:27 am I met Jim on Sept. 9, 1967 on registration day at Luther Seminary. We sat beneath a blue spruce tree and that began a 45-year friendship. He was my companion and confidante, traveling chum and intimate friend. He always had a fireplace going, it seemed and deemed himself “the keeper of the fire”. He was that and more. Together we poked our ways through the world, travlling each summer for 43 years. Through the Maritime Provinces of Canada to the tangos of Argentina, Jim and I had a wonderful life with Minnesota years, New York years and the New Jersey years. I loved him. By Bob WilliamsPosted Aug 8, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis John Barton says: August 10, 2012 at 4:48 pm Such a sad loss. Jim and I were old friends for years through our involvement with Associated Church Press. As we both shared the same Taurus birth sign, we were fated to be collaborators, and collaborate we did on so many issues that confronted ACP in those days. Many were serious – such as the folding of AD Magazine – but some were just plain exciting – for example, when we persuaded the ACP board to break with tradition and hold its convention in a city where we did not have a large number of members. The Boston convention was one of the best ever!Jim was the consummate professional and diplomat and he served his various churches well.Carolyn PurdenFormer editor, Anglican Journal Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (23) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET August 10, 2012 at 5:05 am I met Jim at the WCC Assembly in Canberra in 1991. His family background made him look out for colleagues in Nordic Lutheran churches. We were in touch now and then also after I left my Church of Norway job. I remember him as a friendly and professional colleague. May he rest in God’s peace. Tags James Solheim, retired Episcopal News Service director, dies at 73 People Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska September 2, 2014 at 4:38 pm I, too, am saddened by the death of my brother, and as read his epitaph in the words of friends with whom I worked (Barwell and Freeman in particular), I realize we really did make a contribution and had the privilege of working with some of the greats, especially Presiding Bishop Ed Browning, Barbara Braver, and especially Jim Solheim. I remember how irritated Bishop Spong became at some of Jim’s questions. He always pressed for what was underneath, and not just what was running on the surface. I salute you, Jim. Tom McGrath says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY August 9, 2012 at 5:54 pm I am grateful for the life of Jim Solheim. He was a solid professional journalist who could always be relied upon to uphold the highest standards. And he was a good and generous colleague to me and many others through our work in the Associated Church Press. I learned much from Jim, not least of which was the importance of civility in discourse, a lesson much in demand today. I am saddened at his passing.Tom McGrathLoyola Press Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Obituary, Submit a Press Release Charles Austin says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] Editor’s note: Memorial services will be held at Trinity Lutheran Church in Thief River Falls on Saturday, Sept. 8, at 11 a.m., and at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Trenton on Saturday, Sept. 22 at 10:30 a.m.James E. Solheim – the Episcopal Church’s news director in an era bookended by the election of Anglicanism’s first female bishop and the ordination of its first openly gay bishop – died August 8 after several weeks’ hospitalization. A resident of Trenton, New Jersey, Solheim was 73 and suffered respiratory failure, said his nephew, Kurt Kaisler.Of his career, Solheim said he “followed an ecumenical path, working first for the Lutherans, then the Presbyterians and the United Church of Christ.” Later, “when the Lutherans went off to Chicago to form a new church in 1988, I accepted the position as director of communications in the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts,” he recalled in November 2003, shortly before his retirement.“Of course I had no idea that, a few weeks after I moved to Boston, the diocese would elect Barbara Harris as the Anglican Communion’s first female bishop. The next year was a blur but it provided a dramatic introduction to the Episcopal Church.”Solheim deftly fielded the unprecedented media response to Harris’s election and ordination as bishop, the late Sonia Francis, the Episcopal Church’s executive for communication, said at the time. “He became a familiar figure to many… and played a major role in disseminating and interpreting the news generated by this international event.”Francis joined Presiding Bishop Edmond L. Browning in announcing Solheim’s appointment on April 27, 1989 as the Episcopal Church’s director of news and information. He began work in June of that year, succeeding the Rev. William Dearnaley, and soon rebranded the former Diocesan Press Service as the Episcopal News Service, assisted by then-deputy Jeffrey Penn.“I have such admiration for Jim’s professional skills as well as his friendship,” Browning said after learning of Solheim’s death.  “He was someone always willing to be helpful to colleagues on the staff.  He certainly was that to me.”Solheim served “as the principal church spokesperson and acting as a key figure in the dissemination of news to the secular and religious media — and to the communication network of the Episcopal Church,” the news service reported at the time of his appointment.Solheim supervised media relations surrounding Bishop of New Hampshire Gene Robinson’s 2003 election, confirmed by the General Convention meeting later that year in Minneapolis. By this time, Solheim’s byline had appeared on hundreds of ENS articles, many with companion photo credits, dozens of which won leading awards in national competitions. His 1999 book Diversity or Disunity: Reflections on Lambeth 1998 captured the tone and highlights of that summer’s Lambeth Conference.“Jim was a consummate professional, a journalist who was widely trusted across the church to interpret the events of the Episcopal Church in a fair and comprehensive way,” said the Rev. Canon Brian Grieves, whose tenure as the Episcopal Church’s director of peace and justice ministries closely paralleled Solheim’s own.“He made the Episcopal News Service ‘the’ source to go to for accurate information,” said Grieves. “He was also a great colleague, and I was so fortunate to travel with him on several occasions when we accompanied the presiding bishop on overseas jaunts.“I especially remember his coverage of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict,” Grieves said. “He helped the church understand the injustice of the occupation through his spot-on reporting.“His byline on a trove of stories is his legacy that will be mined for decades to come, along with the incredible photos he took that also told their own stories,” Grieves added. “Most of all I’ll miss his wit, his straight forward honesty, and his engaging insights into all manner of subjects. He was a great raconteur.”Barbara Braver, whom Solheim succeeded as communication director in the Diocese of Massachusetts, recalled first meeting him through the Associated Church Press, an organization that he served as a volunteer and past president.“Jim insisted on the importance of quotes in his reporting, which not only made for good reading, but also brought the newsmakers to life — and made them accountable for their own words,” said Braver, who retired in 2006 after 18 years as communication assistant in the Presiding Bishop’s Office, serving both Browning and his successor, Frank T. Griswold III.“Jim had opinions, most assuredly, but was never a partisan, holding himself to a high standard of fairness, clarity and impartiality,” she added. “His work was greatly respected by his colleagues in a broad ecumenical network of journalists worldwide, who valued as well his good humor and his friendship.”Griswold recalled how Solheim, “in the midst of highly charged and emotional issues, always managed to remain focused and objective in his reporting. These were important gifts to the church, and signs of his own integrity both as a person and a communicator. He was also immensely wise and able to take a long view of things and, when appropriate, able to view ecclesial goings-on with a sense of humor. Jim was a valued friend and colleague: may he rest in peace and rise in glory.”Jerry Hames, editor of the church’s official newspaper Episcopal Life, formerly The Episcopalian, from 1990-2007, said that he “prized the opportunity to work alongside Jim” whom he described as “a professional in every way, dealing skillfully with the secular media, responding quickly to and interpreting accurately — often under difficult circumstances — the many complex issues that confronted the church over the years he served as its news director.”Solheim was “highly regarded, not only by communicators within the Episcopal Church, but also by his colleagues in ecumenical circles and the secular media,” said Hames. “He was often the first point of contact for religion writers of such publications as Time magazine and the New York Times when they needed background or an official comment for an article.“I know I speak for many others whose publications also benefited from his direction and leadership of the news service, his personal support for our work and the integrity by which he carried out his responsibilities.”President of the House of Deputies Gay Jennings said that Solheim “was a great journalist and an even better human being. He will be deeply missed by many in the Episcopal Church and beyond. May he go from strength to strength in the life of perfect service.”Bonnie Anderson, former House of Deputies president, said: “Jim contributed his many skills and gifts to the work of God’s church and was a strong, creative and professional advocate for journalistic excellence and truth-telling. He could always be counted on to brief Executive Council accurately and report with the same sense of clarity and fairness.”In Massachusetts, Solheim served as editor of the diocesan paper, Episcopal Times, in addition to his work as communication director under the administration of then-Bishop David E. Johnson.Solheim brought to this diocesan work wide experience in religious journalism. He was the founding editor and designer of Event, a monthly magazine dealing with social issues (1968-74); associate editor of A.D. Magazine (1977-83); editor of World Encounter (1984-88), and associate director of interpretation for the world mission office of the Lutheran Church in America. He was, starting in 1983, editor of Grapevine, the monthly newsletter of the Joint Strategy and Action Committee (JSAC), a coalition of the national mission agencies of 14 Protestant churches.Born May 16, 1939 in Thief River Falls, Minnesota, Solheim was a graduate of St. Olaf College in Northfield, and held graduate degrees from Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, and Columbia University in New York.Jim is survived by his mother, Verna Solheim Kaisler of Thief River Falls, Minnesota; brothers Ron Solheim of Fergus Falls, Minnesota, and Rod Kaisler, Eagle, Indiana; sisters Jill Kaisler Kezar of Thief River Falls, Minnesota, and Ardeth Kaisler Lewon of Surprize, Arizona; and three nieces and six nephews and their families.Memorial services in New Jersey and Minnesota will be private. A remembrance will be offered by the Episcopal Communicators at its 2013 conference in San Diego.— Robert Williams is canon for community relations in the Diocese of Los Angeles. In 2004 he succeeded Solheim as director of the Episcopal News Service. Cynthia Astle says: August 9, 2012 at 10:33 pm I’m shocked and saddened at the news of Jim Solheim’s passing. Aside from all the other accolades listed here, Jim once gave me a charming lesson in how to pack for the road. He was a shining light of religion journalism and his contributions are countless. We have lost a genuine exemplar of both faith and vocation. Rest in peace, and may light perpetual shine upon you, Jim. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Oeivind Oestang says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Christopher Bugbee says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID David Harris says: Bruce Campbell says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs August 9, 2012 at 10:47 am What a terrible shock. Jim without question lived the well-lived life. The highest praise I can give him is that he was the consummate teacher: he taught not by intent but by generously displaying his learning. Everyone who worked with Jim learned from him, not only from his professionalism but from his heart. Plus, he could whip you on a golf course and smile and make you feel good about it. Via con Dios, brother. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Horace Beasley says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME August 10, 2012 at 10:54 pm I knew Jim from “all sides.” We worked together in Lutheran communications and when I was a reporter for secular newspapers, he was one of those honest, reliable communicators who knew what reporters wanted and how to get it to us. He cared about the Church, he cared about honest communications and he cared about the people around him. He was a blessing. I am sad to hear of his death. When I think of people in church communications who “got it right,” he is always on the list.Charles Austinformer director of News, Lutheran Church in AmericaFormer reporter, The New York Times, Religion News Service, The Record, Hearst News Service. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA August 10, 2012 at 12:51 am God Bless you Jim. You were a consummate journalist, but even more a wonderful human being. God smiled upon us through you. And we return the favor. Blessings brother. See you on the other side. Rector Pittsburgh, PA August 10, 2012 at 1:09 pm I first encountered Jim Solheim at the 2003 Minneapolis General Convention when I was a reporter for Canada’s Anglican Journal. I was so impressed – he was a real pro, knew what journalists needed and was absolutely trustworthy. I thought the Episcopal Church was fortunate to have a person who could be both an articulate, eloquent spokesperson AND edit a journalistically-solid news service. He was just a great guy. Jim, you are already missed.Solange De Santis(former editor, Episcopal Life) August 12, 2012 at 5:46 pm Gone much too quickly. Was there a deadline the rest of us didn’t know about? I enjoyed meeting up with Jim in several world ports — the back streets of Santiago de Compostela for the Faith and Order conference, Canberra, Australia and Geneva often. He was a tremendous help in covering the Episcopal “heresy” trial in Wilmington, Delaware for this fellow Minnesotan, and a Catholic to boot.Whether I was free-lancing an article for the National Catholic Reporter, the United Methodist Reporter, United Church Observer or whatever, Jim could be counted on to summarize the issues cogently and bring me up to speed on the conference, meeting or controversy we were presently huddled around. May St. Peter smile for Jim’s lens and dish out a good quote too. Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL August 9, 2012 at 2:33 pm Jim managed to be both old school and young at heart; his antic spirit and consummate professionalism inevitably linked in one integrated personality that never failed to raise the spirits of those privileged to call him colleague.May his memory be for a blessing.Chris Press Release Service Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Rev. Stephen R. Weston says: Patricia Lefevere says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rev. Richard Foster says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Chris Glaser says: Mark A. Staples says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH August 9, 2012 at 6:09 pm I never met James Solheim, but must have read much of his ENS work. May he walk in the Glory and Light of God’s peace and his family and friends be consoled in their loss. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Len Freeman says: Rector Tampa, FL John Freed says: Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ August 8, 2012 at 11:33 pm I had the privilege of working with Jim on several occasions, most notably Lambeth 1998. He was indeed a pro. More importantly, he was a fine person and a great friend. I learned so much from him and he was always encouraging about my work. His own skills as a writer, communicator and photographer were amazing. Jim was as fine a friend as one could ever find. I shall miss him deeply.David HarrisPresident, ENI, GenevaPublisher, Presbyterian Record, Toronto Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 August 22, 2012 at 10:46 am Jim’s death grieves me deeply! He interviewed me for an article that never appeared in A.D. magazine, given the politics of the Presbyterian Church at the time, but we always made it a point to have a dinner together at every subsequent General Assembly and compare notes. His sense of humor and great choice of restaurants made such church gatherings more bearable. I thank God for his life, his writings, his laughter, and his way of cheering you up with his smile. August 9, 2012 at 7:16 pm I can’t remember a time in my professional life when I did not know Jim. He was present at most meetings of the National Council of Churches Communication Commission and its news and information committee. Some of the news stories he managed at the EC were above average in controversy and he handled each media inquiry with graciousness and honesty. One year he gave a workshop at the NCC on how to handle “bad news,” and he mentored all us commmunicators. I last saw Jim at breakfast in Zabar’s just before he retired and enjoyed joining him in humorous reminiscences about long forgotten ecumenical headlines. I will miss him terribly. Herb Gunn says: December 7, 2012 at 4:49 pm Just now learning about this. I was privileged to meet Jim in 1998 and was always impressed with his professionalism and high standards. A good man, he will be missed. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ August 10, 2012 at 12:17 pm Jim Solheim, Friend.What a shock to hear this sad, sad news, but bearable and prayerfully received with so many comments from so many people who loved and were befriended by Jim.There was a time when Episcopal News Service broke from the church-pablum that passed as religious news and marketing. Count many among those who learned the difference, then tried to make a difference their own diocesan worlds. Thank you Jim Solheim, friend, teacher and mentor. You are missed and mourned!Herb GunnSent from my iPhone Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group August 11, 2012 at 8:18 am It is not possible to express the role of Jim Solheim in my life. As others have eloquently expressed, he was a good friend. Whether in Philadelphia, Boston or Trenton, Jim was the consummate host. His home was a place of warmth, (you could always find a log on the fire), lively social engagement among his many friends and ample food and drink. Likewise he was a consummate traveler. We spent two wonderful summers exploring the great cities of Italy and the art. music and history found there. He liked to comb the back streets of those cities in search of local and/or regional dishes that would curl your toes and make your hair stand on end. Another summer was spent tearing across the Canadian Maritimes. What fun we had. With Jim’s death there’s a hole in the universe, Yet, I give thanks for his presence in my life and the joy that came from knowing him as a friend. Mike Barwell says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY August 9, 2012 at 5:25 pm Sad news about such a vibrant and talented man. And brave, too, even in the ranks of heaven, for to quote the old Norwegian funeral blessing…“Lo, there do I see my sisters and my brothers.I see the line of my people back to the beginning.They do call to me to take my place in the halls of Valhallawhere the brave may live forever.” Carolyn Purden says: August 9, 2012 at 7:15 pm Jim and I go back to the days when he edited World Encounter magazine and I was features editor for The Lutheran. He was a dearest friend and colleague. Thankfully we renewed our friendship briefly this spring when we served as judges for this year’s Wilbur Awards for articles on religious topics produced by secular periodicals. We promised to remain in touch, but at least we had that time. Jim was a fussy editor and writer in the very best sense. He truly was one of my closest colleagues at that time. And he had a uniquely dry wit. Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK August 9, 2012 at 8:19 pm Jim was a wonderful colleague, good friend, superb news writer and photographer, great traveler.I will miss him. Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Philip E. Jenks says: Ian T. Douglas says: Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing August 11, 2012 at 11:33 am Jim was a dear friend, an incredible professional, and a deeply faithful brother in Christ. He will be sorely missed. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Solange De Santis says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Mary Lynn Hendrickson says: Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Comments (1) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] As the shadows lengthened on a brilliant spring Auckland afternoon, and a gentle breeze sighed through the new leaves of the pin oak trees at St. John’s College, Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams paid homage to one of the greatest sons of the church in New Zealand.Sir Paul Reeves – who was bishop, archbishop, governor general of New Zealand, diplomat and advocate for his people – died in August 2011.Maori tikanga, or custom, requires that whanau (family) and friends return to their loved one’s gravesite at the end of a year of mourning to unveil a headstone, and to mark a new beginning for those left behind.In this case, that year became a year and a bit – so that the archbishop of Canterbury could be present at St. John’s College, where Reeves is buried, to attend the unveiling of his kohatu, or headstone, and to pay tribute to a man he has described as a personal hero.This was a sweet and poignant service – which seemed to blend the best that Anglicanism can bring, with the longing and dignity of tikanga Maori, or Maori culture.Because those are the worlds that Reeves – a prince of the church who belonged to the Te Atiawa tribe – had occupied.And in a mark of almost extraordinary empathy, this Welsh-born archbishop of Canterbury began his homily by quoting from the modern Maori poet, Glenn Colquhoun:The art of walking upright here, Is the art of using both feet. One is for holding on. One is for letting go.He then proceeded to give a brief and poignant meditation on how God has ordained ‘doubleness’ in life – “two eyes, two ears, two hands, two feet, two heart valves – things come in two’s” – and how Reeves had mastered the necessary art of living “a holy and double life.”Reeves had had to master the art of living double to an extraordinary level, Williams said: true to his Maori roots, yet representing “the establishment.”“Somebody whose mission and calling was all about taking people seriously…“And somebody who, miraculously failed to take himself at all seriously.“That wonderful doubleness of life is part of what we are celebrating today.”That doubleness of life, the archbishop reflected, “takes us right to the heart of creation and redemption.”He spoke of the “miraculous duality by which God works in us… inhabiting our humanity – and bringing to it the utter strangeness of divinity.”“The ultimate double life,” he said, “is that of Christ himself. So as we give thanks, with great joy, for Paul Reeves’ life, his calling, his witness, his service and his gift to this community, we pray for God to give us the grace of double life.”“The grace of being serious and not serious. The grace of being human and open to the divine. The grace of inhabiting heaven and earth, our own cultures and the stranger’s life,” he added. “Standing upright. And Paul was nothing, if not an upright man. Standing upright on both feet. Holding on, and letting go.”The archbishop’s kauwhau, or sermon, clearly struck a chord with those gathered.Three Maori kaumatua, or elders, spoke after the homily – and each picked up on the challenges of living in a bicultural world: of being true to their Maoritanga, or heritage, while navigating through the Western world.Archbishop David Moxon, senior bishop of the New Zealand dioceses, later spoke of being moved by the simplicity of the unveiling service – it was less than 60 minutes – and how in tune he felt that was with the latter days of Reeves’ life.Reeves had told Moxon that the older he got, the simpler and less complicated his faith had become – and the stronger he held to those simple truths.And Moxon mused too about how a man who is Welsh, and a fluent speaker of the Welsh language, could speak so perceptively of the life and challenges of another bicultural man, born on the other side of the world. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Alda Morgan says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Consultative Council, center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA By Lloyd AshtonPosted Oct 26, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK October 26, 2012 at 4:44 pm Reading this brought tears to my eyes–tears of gratitude for two such souls as Paul Reeves and Rowan Williams. How fortunate we Anglicans are to have their witness and ministries among us! And I’m thinking how fitting for these times are Rowan’s quoting from the Maori poet’s lines about holding on and letting go. Just such “doubleness” is what we face and I hope we can walk that path as well as these two men. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service New Zealand: Archbishop of Canterbury commemorates Sir Paul Reeves An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Archbishop of Canterbury Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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first_img Featured Jobs & Calls John C. Cain, Jr. helps a man choose reading glasses during a medical clinic at Santo Tomas Episcopal Church in Guatier, Dominican Republic. Cain is part of a medical team from upstate New York that is running a medical clinic March 3-7 at the church. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic] Two hours. That’s how long it took a medical mission team from upstate New York to set up its clinic at Santo Tomas, an Episcopal Church in Gautier.The mission, now in its 16th year, runs like clockwork in the former sugarcane community located not far from the popular tourist beach in Boca Chica.Patients arrive with problems including high blood pressure, respiratory trouble, gastrointestinal difficulties, skin rashes, diabetes. A visit can take between three and four hours, depending on the number of patients awaiting treatment; the team typically sees between 1,000 and 1,500 patients during the five-day clinic.Upon entering the clinic, a patient visits a registration table, where forms are issued. Intake follows, where weight and blood pressure are measured. Then Rita Bush, a dietician and diabetes educator from Malta, New York, pricks the fingers of those wishing to have their blood sugar tested. Many patients have high blood pressure and diabetes, and many go without medication.If a person has fasted, normal blood sugar, or glucose, levels range between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter. If a person has eaten, you might see 130 milligrams. Anything over 160 indicates diabetes. On the morning on March 3, two patients had blood sugar levels of 500 milligrams, one of them an insulin-dependent child, said Bush.Rita Bush, a dietician and diabetes counselor, tests a patient’s blood sugar during the first day of the medical clinic at Santo Tomas in Gautier. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceAfter these preliminary checks, the patient waits to see a doctor or physician assistant before visiting the pharmacy. The final stop is a prayer station to receive, not only prayers, but also a care package with soap, toothpaste and other practical personal-hygiene items.“For some of these people, it’s the only time [during the year] they see a doctor,” said Kevin Bolan, a physician assistant from Newcomb, New York. As the week progresses, he added, people arrive at the clinic from further and further away.The upstate New York team’s journey began around 2:30 a.m. on Feb. 28 when the members boarded a bus bound for John F. Kennedy International Airport at St. Eustace Episcopal Church in Lake Placid. Besides their personal luggage, they brought 40 large plastic bins filled with supplies and medication.Just as the New York group arrived in the Dominican Republic, another medical mission team from North Carolina was traveling back to Santo Domingo from Jimaní, a border town where it had spent the week operating a clinic out of San Pablo Apostol, another Episcopal Church.It was the first time Giga Smith, a registered nurse and member of Christ Church in New Bern, North Carolina, joined a medical mission team.“I’ve always wanted to do this,” she said. “At first it felt very emotional, but then I got into the mindset that I was going to do all I could.”Dr. Richard Taft of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Greenville, North Carolina, treats a young patient during a medical clinic at San Pablo Apostol in Jimaní. A medical team from North Carolina ran a clinic out of the church Feb. 24-27.Jimaní, population 13,000, is one of two main border crossings between the Dominican Republic and its neighbor to the west, Haiti. In four days, the team treated 716 people, ranging in age from 22 months to 90 years. A local Haitian doctor was on hand throughout the clinic and will provide follow-up care for the patients.“In giving of their time, the teams are showing an example of God’s love to all humanity,” said Karen Carroll, an Episcopal Church-appointed missionary serving the Diocese of the Dominican Republic.To administer medical care in the Dominican Republic, professionals must provide valid credentials and a list of all medications, including expiration dates, lot numbers and intended uses, to Carroll, who files the appropriate paperwork with the public heath ministry.In total, 14 U.S.-based medical mission teams will travel to the Dominican Republic in 2014, up from nine teams in 2013, said Carroll.It’s as much about being a Christian mission and accompanying the Dominican church as it is about providing medical care, say team members.“First and foremost, we are a Christian mission,” said Connie Reynolds, a licensed practical nurse and a Baptist member of the upstate New York team. “And then a medical mission.”Connie Reynolds, an LPN, and Laura Bolan, who plans to become a physician assistant, measured medication in the pharmacy at Santo Tomas Episcopal Church in Gautier. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceStill the doctors, nurses, dieticians and physical therapists provide medical care to many poor and impoverished people who otherwise might fall through the cracks of the country’s public-health system.In 2001, the Dominican Republic approved health-care reforms aimed at providing universal coverage to its citizens. The implementation, however, has been lacking, with rural areas lagging behind urban areas, and fee-based medical care surpassing the care offered through the public system, according to the World Health Organization.International medical missions are sometimes described as “Band-aides,” with criticisms including foreign practitioners’ disrespect for local health-care providers; missioners’ lack of appropriate cultural practices; teams’ inadequate language skills and interpretation for treating patients in a foreign language; and the high travel costs when funds potentially could be spent in more appropriate ways.Well aware of the criticism, the teams making annual visits to the Dominican Republic say that saving just one life and seeing the overall improvement in health and hygiene in the community from year to year justifies their worth.For instance, a young man came to the clinic in Jimaní on the verge of a diabetic crisis, said Dr. Richard Taft, a retired OBGNY from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Greenville, North Carolina. After receiving insulin, the young man quickly recovered. Another man whose eyelids were swollen shut began an immediate recovery when treated with antibiotics, added Taft.There used to be a large sugar cane plantation in Gautier and many Haitian migrants lived nearby in bateyes like this one. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceGautier has one medical clinic staffed by a doctor; the nearest hospital is 15-20 minutes away by car. Jimaní has a rudimentary hospital that was built in 1948 and is staffed by six general practitioners, two OBGYNs and one general surgeon, according to North Carolina team members who toured the facility.In many ways, said Dr. Allen Van Dyke, an OBGYN from Ashville, North Carolina, “the medical care is relative to the living conditions.”Witnessing the amount of suffering on the border stirred emotions and thoughts about the U.S.-health care system in team members from North Carolina.Anne Bena, a physical therapist, fits a patient with a walker. Before receiving the walker, the patient, who Bena has known for four years, used two crutches to get around. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceIt was hard to reconcile the enormous amount of money spent on medical care in the United States, said Sandy Johnson, a pediatric nurse, with the enormous amount of suffering many people endure.“I don’t know what you do with the disparity,” said Susan Bickery-Mercer, who’d read “Mountains Beyond Mountains,” Tracy Kidder’s biography of Dr. Paul Farmer and his experience providing medical care to people in Haiti, before making the trip.One of the most powerful things Bickery-Mercer, youth minister at St. Paul’s in Greenville, witnessed as part of the team was the ease with which the local people share their lives.When people are clearly suffering and in need, the connection tends to be at the heart level, she said. It was something Taft sensed as well, and added, that for Christians, ritual Sunday worship can sometimes become a blinder to the Spirit.“To see the rawness of life is a very powerful thing,” said Taft. “Getting out of your comfort zone allows you to step back and reflect. That’s the essence of mission.“We just happen to do it with medicine.”Back in Gautier, community residents must travel either to Boca Chica or Santo Domingo to visit a hospital, said Ermita Reyes, a community and church leader, and even though the hospital in Boca Chica is just a short distance away, it can cost a life.“Their [the team’s] presence is an example of the grace of God in the community,” she said.Savannah Gordon registers a patient on the March 3, the first day of the five-day medical clinic at Santo Tomas. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe New York team’s medical clinic is the only full medical clinic to visit the community annually, said Connie Reynolds, the LPN, who brings her daughter, Savannah Gordon, along to help out.It was the fifth time Gordon, a college student, took part in the medical mission.“After the first year, I came back a different person,” she said. “It’s humbling to see how people live and be part of the community and develop friendships.“It’s heartbreaking to come back and learn that someone has died.”Kevin Bolan’s daughter also accompanies him. Laura Bolan recently graduated with a master’s degree in public health and plans to follow her father’s example and become a physician assistant. To her, the need for more frequent clinics and follow-up trips, as well as efforts toward disease mitigation, are obvious.“It would be great if we could partner with another group and come down every six months,” she said.Paul Gutmann and Domingo de la Rosa display the three-bucket water filtration system. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe care packages, providing soap and toothpaste, and the clean-water bucket-filtration system that Paul Gutmann provides are important because many of the problems people present with come from drinking parasite-infected water and poor personal hygiene, said Laura Bolan.Gutmann works with a local contact to distribute the filtration systems. Each unit costs about $33, but Gutmann raises money and contributes his own money to make them affordable. He may not have high success rates now, but he hopes the next generation, one that has grown up knowing the risks of drinking contaminated water, will begin to filter its own water, he said.With 40 bins of supplies and medication, each weighing between 40 and 50 pounds, the New York medical team brings enough medication to leave behind to be distributed by a nurse working locally. Patients leave the clinic with three months’ worth and can return for follow-up tests and more medication, as needed.“The challenge is leaving them with enough medication,” said Kevin Bolan, who already had been thinking about organizing a skeleton crew to return and run a clinic over Labor Day weekend. “It’s a work in progress; we have to figure out what works.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service.  Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 6, 2014 July 31, 2017 at 3:33 pm Is this clinic still up and running? I do mission work in the DR and we have a boy who we are trying to get in to school. The medical analysis done by the school said he cannot start because he has “an amoeba and dirty blood”.We have found we cannot trust hardly anyone: lawyers, pastors, doctors, vets, etc. One doctor has told us it will cost $600 to treat this boy, but he refuses to tell us what medicine he will use to treat him. He is also saying the boy will have to be brought to him twice a day for treatment.Can you help us?? Press Release Service Comments (4) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Medical missions provide care for Dominicans, Haitians Church-run clinics help fill the health-care gap Joyce Burt says: TR Shively, DDS says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA March 6, 2014 at 5:34 pm Where is the dental component of the health care mission? Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET March 6, 2014 at 10:57 am per you previous published item se also the wonderful work being organized by Rev Clelia https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2013/07/10/haiti-medical-missions-best-practices-symposium/ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Haiti Medical Missions, Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Roy Talbot says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Province IX Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Latin America, Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Haiti, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY March 7, 2014 at 12:42 am Can someone get me the information on the three bucket water filtering system???? Please! The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA AliceMarie Slaven-Emond,RN,MS, FNP-C says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Por Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted Jul 2, 2015 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Chuck Stewart, diputado de Nueva York Central, estudia el presupuesto junto con su colega diputada, Rda. Georgina Hegney. Foto de Tracy Sukraw/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] El Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas (PB&F) propuso el 1 de julio un presupuesto para la Iglesia Episcopal en el trienio 2016-2018 que incluye una nueva e importante iniciativa de $2 millones para justicia y reconciliación raciales, al tiempo que reduce la cantidad de dinero que se les pide a las diócesis que contribuyan a un 15 por ciento para 2018.El presupuesto trienal 2016-2018 se basa en un ingreso de $122.243.102 para el trienio que termina el 31 de diciembre de este año. El comité proyectó gastos de $122.189.125. Por consiguiente, el presupuesto trae un superávit de $70.834, una cifra que el comité en el texto del presupuesto calificó de “insignificante en vista de las múltiples predicciones [que se presentan] en un presupuesto de tres años”.El comité presentó el presupuesto en una sesión conjunta el 1 de julio. Tanto la Cámara de Obispos como la Cámara de Diputados deben aprobar el presupuesto, conviniendo en cualesquiera cambios apoyados por una o por la otra.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori abrió la sesión con una oración: “Nos hemos reunido aquí para considerar la mejor manera de usar los recursos que nos has dado para la obra de tu mundo restituido. Mantennos receptivos de corazón y mente y espíritu para que podamos discernir la dirección de tu Espíritu”.El obispo Stephen Lane, de la Diócesis de Maine y vicepresidente del PB&F, dijo a la sesión conjunta que el proceso presupuestario, diseñado conjuntamente por el PB&F y el Consejo Ejecutivo, era “colaborativo y amistoso [y]… era bueno para el PB&F y bueno para la Iglesia”.El presupuesto está disponible como un PDF aquí en inglés y en español.Los estímulos para la iniciativa de justicia y reconciliación raciales del presupuesto provienen de la Resolución C019 que le pide a la Iglesia que responda a la injusticia racial sistémica y solicita $1,2 millones para esa tarea.“Fue el sentir del comité (PB&F) que —dada la atmósfera en que vivimos ahora con los atentados y las dificultades que enfrentan los afroamericanos— queríamos hacer más”, dijo a ENS la Rda. Mally Lloyd, de Massachusetts, presidente del PB&F, el día antes de que se presentara el presupuesto. “Denles $2 millones y una pizarra en blanco para que realmente traten de hacer algo nuevo para la Iglesia que esperamos tendrá un impacto importante”.Lloyd dijo que el comité decidió no ocuparse de las dimensiones del trabajo “para que el movimiento del Espíritu” guíe a los líderes de la Iglesia.Los $2 millones provendrá de las reservas de corto plazo de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS) y forma parte del superávit de $4,7 millones con el cual se predijo que terminaría el trienio 2013-2015.“Estamos corriendo un riesgo como Iglesia de no tener una emergencia que precise 0recurrir a esas reservas”, dijo Lane a ENS. “Vemos esto como una circunstancia extraordinaria y una oportunidad extraordinaria y, por consiguiente, estamos usando medios extraordinarios para sostenerla”.Supuestos ingresosEl presupuesto supone el ingreso de $76,6 millones en compromisos de las diócesis de la Iglesia (renglón 2), aproximadamente $2,1 millones más de lo proyectado en el trienio actual. Cerca del 62 por ciento de los ingresos del presupuesto provienen de las promesas de las diócesis y zonas regionales de misión de la Iglesia. La contribución real en el trienio actual se espera que ascienda a $79,3 millones.Sarah Neumann, diputada de Massachusetts, estudia el presupuesto por vía de la carpeta virtual en su iPad. Foto de Tracy Sukraw/ENS.La contribución anual de cada año en el presupuesto de tres años se basa en el ingreso de una diócesis dos años antes, menos $120.000. A esas entidades se les pide actualmente que contribuyan con un 19 por ciento de sus ingresos de dos años antes, menos $120.000.El presupuesto que el PB&F propone aumenta esa exención a $150.000. Su proyección de ingresos se basa en solicitar de las diócesis de la Iglesia y sus zonas de misión regionales que contribuyan con un 18 por ciento de sus ingresos para financiar el presupuesto de 2016, un 16,5 por ciento para el presupuesto de 2017 y un 15 por ciento en 2018.Lloyd y Lane dijeron que el PB&F cree que el anteproyecto presupuestario del Consejo Ejecutivo para el trienio 2016-2018 se basaba en un investigación sólida cuando llegó a predecir cómo las contribuciones diocesanas responderían a una solicitud reducida. Lane dijo que él y el obispo de Ohio, Mark Hollingsworth, que preside el comité del Consejo que redactó el presupuesto dado al PB&F, también llevaron a cabo una encuesta informal de los obispos cuyas diócesis no cumplen con la solicitud del 19 por ciento.“Encontramos un completo apoyo para el objetivo del 15 por ciento”, dijo él. “Encontramos un compromiso sustancial de parte de los que están por debajo del 15 por ciento de moverse en esa dirección en el transcurso del trienio. Tenemos confianza de que el objetivo del 15 por ciento está respaldado sólidamente por los obispos de la Iglesia”.Lloyd añadió que ella cree que hay algunas diócesis “par las cuales este 15 por ciento nunca será alcanzable”. Sin embargo, agregó, el Comité de Revisión de Tasaciones Diocesanas planeado por el Consejo ayudará a que las contribuciones de un porcentaje “realista” de esas diócesis sea visto como “plena participación” en la financiación del presupuesto denominacional, en lugar de sentirse sancionadas y criticadas por no pagar el total de la solicitud.Los ingresos del presupuesto se calculan partiendo del supuesto que aproximadamente un tercio de las diócesis que pagan un 19 por ciento o más decrecerán sus contribuciones para ponerse a la par de la solicitud anual, como aquellas que ahora pagan entre el 19 y el 15 por ciento.Aquellas diócesis que dan menos del 15 por ciento se predice que aumenten su contribución anual dando un mínimo de un diez por ciento de su contribución cada año. Por consiguiente, si una diócesis está pagando un 9 por ciento, aumentará su contribución en el primer año a 9,9 por ciento y así sucesivamente.La proyección de ingresos por concepto de compromisos diocesanos también se basa en que los ingresos percibidos en la esfera diocesana aumenten un medio por ciento, según las notas que aparecen en el renglón 1.A pesar de que hay resoluciones pendientes que piden que las tasaciones [diocesanas] se reduzcan inmediatamente al 15 por ciento, Lloyd dijo que el comité había rechazado tales solicitudes al principio. “Creímos que era una reducción demasiado drástica y demasiado apresurada y que le presentaría al nuevo obispo primado la toma de algunas decisiones difíciles que no parecían justas durante su primer año”, apuntó ella.La solicitud diocesana no es una tasación canónicamente obligatoria y el Equipo de Trabajo para Reinventar la Iglesia Episcopal pidió un cambio en su informe final. La Cámara de Diputados consideró sustituir la Resolución D013 (que ocuparía el lugar de su versión original y también el de las [resoluciones] A008, A110 y A111) y, entre otras cosas, cambiaría el carácter voluntario de la solicitud diocesana por una tasación obligatoria. El PB&F no cuenta con la autoridad para hacer obligatoria la solicitud.De las 109 diócesis y tres zonas regionales, 49 diócesis pagaron la solicitud en su totalidad o más en 2014. Una lista de los compromisos diocesanos y pagos hechos en 2013 y de los compromisos de 2014 puede verse aquí.Los ingresos del presupuesto incluyen también un aporte, o dividendo, del 5 por ciento de los ingresos provenientes de los aproximadamente $220 millones de la DFMS en valores invertidos irrestrictos. Las extracciones ascienden a $28,2 millones, en lugar de los $24,5 millones previstos en el trienio actual (renglón 3).Además de los pagos diocesanos, la aportación del 5 por ciento y las reservas a corto plazo destinadas al programa de justicia racial, otros importantes renglones de ingreso incluyen casi $10 millones por concepto de alquileres [de espacios] en el Centro Denominacional de la Iglesia, $2,1 millones del programa de cobros de préstamos a refugiados del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, una extracción de $1.100.000 para apoyar a la oficina de desarrollo y $1.200.000 en ingresos de la Convención General, junto con otras fuentes más pequeñas.El lado de los gastosLos gastos en el presupuesto 2016-2018 se han estructurado, al igual que en el presupuesto actual, en torno a las Cinco Marcas de la Misión de la Comunión Anglicana.A fin de ajustarse a los requisitos canónicos para asignar gastos en las áreas de programa, canónicos y corporativos, cada renglón de gastos está codificado a uno de esas tres categorías, y la resolución habilitante del presupuesto, que aún no tiene número, resume los gatos de esa manera.Los gastos de programa ascienden a $64,3 millones, los corporativos a $35,2 millones y los canónicos a $22,5 millones. Los montos por cada categoría en cada año se especifican en la resolución del presupuesto.Hay cuatro tipos de asignaciones en el presupuesto que se propone:Subvenciones de desarrollo/sostenibilidad a largo plazo que facilitan asociaciones con diócesis y el resto del mundo.Subvenciones en bloque, cuyo uso lo decide el beneficiario con las auditorías y los informes situacionales que se requieren. Por ejemplo, se han presupuestado $1.500.000 para las diócesis de Alaska, Navajolandia, Dakota del Norte y Dakota del Sur para extender la obra con las poblaciones indígenas. Esas subvenciones representan un aumento en comparación con el trienio actual. El presupuesto incluye su subvención habitual a colegios universitarios tradicionalmente afroamericanos, que esta vez se ha reducido ligeramente a $1.600.000. Sin embargo, hay $400.000 adicionales para repartirse entre los dos centros de estudio ( Augustine’s College en Raleigh, Carolina del Norte, y Voorhees College en Denmark, Carolina del Sur) como subvenciones para el desarrollo, lo cual representa un aumento de $20.000 a la subvención total.Subvenciones de nuevas iniciativas para enfoques experimentales en la edificación del cuerpo de Cristo. La subvención para Justicia y Reconciliación Raciales es uno de ellas.Subvenciones de propósitos especiales para programas específicos con un propósito y un plan. Los $3 millones del trienio actual en subvenciones para Zonas de Empresa de Misión y Comienzo de Nuevas Iglesias son ejemplos de estas subvenciones. El presupuesto que se propone aumenta su financiación en $1 millón.Otros puntos a resaltar del presupuesto$750.000 para evangelización digital se han añadido al presupuesto de comunicaciones en respuesta al compromiso de Michael Curry, el obispo primado electo, con la evangelización (renglón 53b).$1.200.000 como contribución de la Iglesia a la Oficina de la Comunión Anglicana, un aumento de $500.000 (renglón 193).Por primera vez, el presupuesto refleja los costos operativos y el ingreso de00 la junta de la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias (renglones 265-268).$1.100.000 (un aumento de $257.357) para el renglón 281a, (llamado anteriormente de Comités, Comisiones, Agencias y Juntas, y llamado ahora Organismos Interinos). El presupuesto asume una reducción de un tercio en el número de organismos interinos y reduce en un tercio a los miembros de cada uno de esos organismos, pero aumenta la financiación disponible para las reuniones o encuentros personales.$300.000 para la preparación en el uso de los cánones disciplinarios del clero, Título IV de los Cánones de la Iglesia (renglón 281b).Lloyd y Lane dijeron que apreciaban enormemente que tantas resoluciones que conllevaban financiación hubieran comenzado a moverse muy temprano a través de la Convención, ayudando así al proceso presupuestario del comité.“Lo más difícil en un presupuesto operativo es reservar fondos para empeños nuevos y me siento particularmente gratificado que Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas haya sido creativo y emprendedor en buscar modos de unificar recursos y en consecuencia este presupuesto sí ha contemplado de manera significativa [la inclusión] de nuevas tareas al tiempo de tratar de ser fiel al programa y estructura de la Iglesia Episcopal”, afirmó Lane.Cualquier cambio en esa estructura promulgado por la Convención General “podría significar que el Consejo Ejecutivo tendrá que tomar el presupuesto que hemos aprobado y cambiarlo hasta un punto cual nunca antes ha tenido que hacerse”, reconoció Lloyd.El PB&F tuvo que funcionar en conformidad con los cánones actuales, dijo ella, y no podía prever cambios canónicos.“Siempre supimos que si la restructuración hubiera sido aprobada el segundo día [de la Convención] los cánones no habrían entrado en vigor hasta el 1 de enero, de manera que tuvimos que producir un presupuesto basado en el viejo modelo canónico”, apuntó.El comité dijo en el texto que acompañaba las hojas de cálculo del presupuesto que se siente agradecido de que: los miembros del PB&F participaran en la creación del proceso que el Consejo Ejecutivo utilizó para crear su anteproyecto del presupuesto; de que los miembros fueran bienvenidos en todas las reuniones del Consejo y de que el Consejo compartiera [con el comité] la reacción que había solicitado de toda la Iglesia.“La actitud colaborativa asumida por el Consejo Ejecutivo produjo un presupuesto convincente y balanceado”, dijo el comité en su texto. “Sin embargo, un presupuesto tan estrictamente balanceado no permite cambios fáciles. Grandes asignaciones en respuesta a la legislación resultan aun difíciles de contemplar”.El texto del PB&F sugiere que el Consejo considera asignar una partida en bloque, sin especificar, de $2 a $5 millones en su anteproyecto presupuestario 2019-2021 al objeto de darle al PB&F mayor flexibilidad para responder a “las necesidades y las prioridades de la Convención General”.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA General Convention 2015 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID La obra en pro de la justicia racial es el plato fuerte del presupuesto 2016-2018 El comité propone reducir la solicitud diocesana al 15 por ciento en el transcurso de tres años Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC General Convention, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Vikki MyersPosted Dec 13, 2016 Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Nancy Mott says: December 13, 2016 at 4:15 pm Hey, I’m so proud of St. Peter’s Episcopal School! Not just being the first in Tennessee to offer Spanish immersion program! but also that it’s in the Diocese of East Tennessee. It appears to me Tennessee schools, public and private, have not only been slow to offer services to our growing Hispanic population but also slow to provide adequate second language programs., which as Ms. Myers points out is a significant advantage to our youth.And for parents worried about students being “behind” in content subjects, from everything I’ve read about experimental programs in California, even if there’s a bit of a lag in early grades, students have not only caught up by sixth grade but are actually ahead of their mono-lingual peers. Bravo, St. Peter’s! Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (2) Susan Delgado-Park says: Comments are closed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Monica Griffin, Spanish-language immersion curriculum coordinator and preschool lead teacher at St. Peter’s School in Chattanooga, has “circle time” with children in immersion Kindergarten classroom. Photo: St. Peter’s School[Episcopal Church in East Tennessee] ¡Hola! (Hello!) 15 kindergarteners call out as a visitor walks into their classroom – as much in unison as kindergarteners can be. The children are having “circle time,” sitting in a circle on a rug with Lead Teacher Betsy Cake.Cake introduces the visitor, then claps her hands to the rhythm of a song to keep the children’s attention. “Vamos a cantar la cancion de hoy, (Let’s sing today’s song)” she says and she and the children sing “Si usted esta feliz apaluda las fuerte … (If you’re happy, clap your hands).” Then the children say together “¡Me allegro de verte! (I’m glad to see you!)”This is the kindergarten Spanish-language immersion class at St. Peter’s Episcopal School in Chattanooga, Tennessee.In 2015, St. Peter’s became the first school in the state to implement a 100-percent Spanish-language immersion program. It is Chattanooga’s first and only elementary school that offers a language immersion track alongside its classic curriculum.Head of School Meredith Ruffner provides a framework in the school’s mission for why the Spanish-immersion program is important to the school. “Our mission is a love of learning, joy of service and a lively faith. We feel that a global heart and a global mind goes right in with that because we’re wanting to instill in our children a desire to help and serve and interact with people, not just in their community, but all over,” she said.Ruffner, who became head of school four years ago had a vision for a Spanish-language immersion program at St. Peter’s so a team was formed to look into it.There were questions about whether Chattanooga was ready for a program like this and whether parents would embrace it, but “the more we talked about it, the more impressed we were with how it fit our mission as an Episcopal school. We just felt it was what our school needed,” Ruffner said.Sarah Steffner, president of the Board of Trustees at the time, said, “Our team was doing a lot of research and through God and serendipity, a teacher was leaving as Monica Griffin [Spanish-immersion curriculum coordinator] found the school.”We decided that if we were going to do this, we would need to do it right,” Ruffner said. The team found add.a.lingua, an education consultant company that helps schools implement a second language in the school. Ruffner and Griffin spent several days at the company’s headquarters in Grand Rapids, Michigan, to talk with people at the company and tour schools that were already working with the program. They liked add.a.lingua’s philosophy and comprehensive program. St. Peter’s is now partnering with the company.Two years ago, St. Peter’s began offering the immersion program to three-year-olds as “kind of an experiment,” a pilot program, to see how it would go. Steffner said, “It was kind of tricky. Between spring and fall the whole thing changed.”It turned out to be a success all around. After an initial “bump,” students and parents loved it.“We are fortunate that our board and parent-teacher organization are very supportive of it, but some of the parents initially had qualms about the program,” Ruffner said.“We found out approximately a month before school started; we had so many questions and fears,” said Brandy Biederman, a St. Peter’s parent. “We had no clue what Spanish immersion was. I was and am very outspoken and immediately asked for meetings to answer our questions. This was our baby girl and we were going to throw her into an unknown setting with unknown people and an unknown language. Had it not have been for Meredith [Ruffner], we wouldn’t have done it. We trust her, always have.” Biederman says she and her husband are now the biggest fans for Spanish immersion at St. Peter’s.Ruffner said, “There isn’t a large Hispanic population in Chattanooga and the vast majority of students are not connected to Hispanic culture at all – the parents just see the value in learning a second language. We talked a lot with our parents in the community about what the research says about children’s minds, and what is best for them as they grow and develop. Language is at the top of the list.”The goal is that when the children graduate from fifth grade, they’re completely bilingual – able to read, write, and do math in both English and Spanish. Ruffner said that those skills are transferrable, so whatever skills they’re learning in Spanish, they’re transferring to English.Ruffner said “About midway through the first year, the school started talking with parents about their thoughts for the next year to see if they wanted to go into our regular junior kindergarten 4-year-old class and everybody was saying, ‘We want immersion.’ This year, that class has moved up to kindergarten. Now we have three full classes.”Teachers are native Spanish speakers and the children quickly learn the most common things they need to know, such as the names of things in the classroom, words for quieting down, sussuren, and words for if they need to go the bathroom. In class, they have a normal kindergarten curriculum – including learning numbers, letters and songs. Signs hanging in the kindergarten classroom – abrir la puerta (open the door), and ayudar con el bocatillo (help with the snack) – remind students to be polite and to help their teacher and their classmates.Most parents and siblings speak English at home, but pick up Spanish from the young children in the immersion classes.Biederman said, “We only speak what we have learned from them. It’s definitely interesting how much we have picked up and don’t realize. Our grocery app is through Amazon’s Alexa and when I pull it up, most of the items are in Spanish because that’s how we say it for her to order it. I didn’t even realize that until now,” she said.The Rev. Quinn Parman, whose son is in the program, said in a new video, “We love stories – and you can tell as you’re reading that there’s nothing missed. He gets the stories and he understands them. The fact that he knows Spanish and learns English at home does not in any way hamper our ability to do that – in fact, it probably amplifies what he’s doing in school.”“The time I notice him growing the most in Spanish is when I see him teaching his sister. I’ll hear them playing and sometimes when I hear them playing restaurant, there’s a couple foods I’ll hear him saying in Spanish as well,” said Quinn Parman in the video.Griffin said, “We have a lot of older siblings in my class. Their parents send me videos all the time about them playing and being on the playground and in the playroom and reading to their younger siblings – it’s adorable to see.”Biederman said that add.a.lingua and St. Peter’s are very open to meetings and discussions. “I have access to Monica [Griffin], Meredith [Ruffner] and all of the teachers as needed. We have frequent evaluations as well. So parents can ensure that their child’s educational needs and parents’ expectations are supported in the program,” she said.Biederman voices the hope that other parents also have for their children, “We hope this is a springboard for them to learn even more languages in middle/high school. We also hope this opens up limitless opportunities for their career choices.”She notes that although some parents prefer the classic curriculum for their children, “We are the biggest fans for Spanish immersion at St. Peter’s,” Biederman said. “As parents, we are constantly looking for ways to give our children every advantage, St. Peter’s provides just that. By the children learning in another language, our hopes are that they will learn to process complex issues with a greater ease. My two children will leave fifth grade bilingual and fluent. That’s a life altering skill that will provide leverage throughout their life,” she said.“I feel very proud of my son, that he’s learning a new language and that he’s growing in new ways,” said Rachelle Parman said.Quinn Parman said, “I really hope this gives [my son] a drive to want to connect and make the world a better place.”– Vikki Myers is communications director for the Diocese of East Tennessee. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Chattanooga Episcopal school first in Tennessee to offer full Spanish-language immersion Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH December 26, 2016 at 3:56 pm Having lived in Honduras for 18 years and worked with several of the bilingual Episcopal Schools there for many years, I am delighted to see St Peter’s pursuing the idea of a bilingual school program. In Honduras, we start our preschoolers in immersion programs of English for three years before they began their Spanish studies in elementary school. They use US textbooks for their English classes and Spanish language textbooks for their Spanish classes concurrently. Now our schools go through High School and our children graduate bilingual and bi-cultural.Our high schoolers often help translate for visiting teams which has enabled many of them to know other parts of the country as well as learn how many of their fellow Hondurans live. Many of those students have gone on to study the fields they helped to translate for–teachers, doctors, nurses, dentists, and architects. They will indeed find it a blessing. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more