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first_img August 10, 2012 at 11:27 am I met Jim on Sept. 9, 1967 on registration day at Luther Seminary. We sat beneath a blue spruce tree and that began a 45-year friendship. He was my companion and confidante, traveling chum and intimate friend. He always had a fireplace going, it seemed and deemed himself “the keeper of the fire”. He was that and more. Together we poked our ways through the world, travlling each summer for 43 years. Through the Maritime Provinces of Canada to the tangos of Argentina, Jim and I had a wonderful life with Minnesota years, New York years and the New Jersey years. I loved him. By Bob WilliamsPosted Aug 8, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis John Barton says: August 10, 2012 at 4:48 pm Such a sad loss. Jim and I were old friends for years through our involvement with Associated Church Press. As we both shared the same Taurus birth sign, we were fated to be collaborators, and collaborate we did on so many issues that confronted ACP in those days. Many were serious – such as the folding of AD Magazine – but some were just plain exciting – for example, when we persuaded the ACP board to break with tradition and hold its convention in a city where we did not have a large number of members. The Boston convention was one of the best ever!Jim was the consummate professional and diplomat and he served his various churches well.Carolyn PurdenFormer editor, Anglican Journal Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (23) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET August 10, 2012 at 5:05 am I met Jim at the WCC Assembly in Canberra in 1991. His family background made him look out for colleagues in Nordic Lutheran churches. We were in touch now and then also after I left my Church of Norway job. I remember him as a friendly and professional colleague. May he rest in God’s peace. Tags James Solheim, retired Episcopal News Service director, dies at 73 People Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska September 2, 2014 at 4:38 pm I, too, am saddened by the death of my brother, and as read his epitaph in the words of friends with whom I worked (Barwell and Freeman in particular), I realize we really did make a contribution and had the privilege of working with some of the greats, especially Presiding Bishop Ed Browning, Barbara Braver, and especially Jim Solheim. I remember how irritated Bishop Spong became at some of Jim’s questions. He always pressed for what was underneath, and not just what was running on the surface. I salute you, Jim. Tom McGrath says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY August 9, 2012 at 5:54 pm I am grateful for the life of Jim Solheim. He was a solid professional journalist who could always be relied upon to uphold the highest standards. And he was a good and generous colleague to me and many others through our work in the Associated Church Press. I learned much from Jim, not least of which was the importance of civility in discourse, a lesson much in demand today. I am saddened at his passing.Tom McGrathLoyola Press Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Obituary, Submit a Press Release Charles Austin says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] Editor’s note: Memorial services will be held at Trinity Lutheran Church in Thief River Falls on Saturday, Sept. 8, at 11 a.m., and at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Trenton on Saturday, Sept. 22 at 10:30 a.m.James E. Solheim – the Episcopal Church’s news director in an era bookended by the election of Anglicanism’s first female bishop and the ordination of its first openly gay bishop – died August 8 after several weeks’ hospitalization. A resident of Trenton, New Jersey, Solheim was 73 and suffered respiratory failure, said his nephew, Kurt Kaisler.Of his career, Solheim said he “followed an ecumenical path, working first for the Lutherans, then the Presbyterians and the United Church of Christ.” Later, “when the Lutherans went off to Chicago to form a new church in 1988, I accepted the position as director of communications in the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts,” he recalled in November 2003, shortly before his retirement.“Of course I had no idea that, a few weeks after I moved to Boston, the diocese would elect Barbara Harris as the Anglican Communion’s first female bishop. The next year was a blur but it provided a dramatic introduction to the Episcopal Church.”Solheim deftly fielded the unprecedented media response to Harris’s election and ordination as bishop, the late Sonia Francis, the Episcopal Church’s executive for communication, said at the time. “He became a familiar figure to many… and played a major role in disseminating and interpreting the news generated by this international event.”Francis joined Presiding Bishop Edmond L. Browning in announcing Solheim’s appointment on April 27, 1989 as the Episcopal Church’s director of news and information. He began work in June of that year, succeeding the Rev. William Dearnaley, and soon rebranded the former Diocesan Press Service as the Episcopal News Service, assisted by then-deputy Jeffrey Penn.“I have such admiration for Jim’s professional skills as well as his friendship,” Browning said after learning of Solheim’s death.  “He was someone always willing to be helpful to colleagues on the staff.  He certainly was that to me.”Solheim served “as the principal church spokesperson and acting as a key figure in the dissemination of news to the secular and religious media — and to the communication network of the Episcopal Church,” the news service reported at the time of his appointment.Solheim supervised media relations surrounding Bishop of New Hampshire Gene Robinson’s 2003 election, confirmed by the General Convention meeting later that year in Minneapolis. By this time, Solheim’s byline had appeared on hundreds of ENS articles, many with companion photo credits, dozens of which won leading awards in national competitions. His 1999 book Diversity or Disunity: Reflections on Lambeth 1998 captured the tone and highlights of that summer’s Lambeth Conference.“Jim was a consummate professional, a journalist who was widely trusted across the church to interpret the events of the Episcopal Church in a fair and comprehensive way,” said the Rev. Canon Brian Grieves, whose tenure as the Episcopal Church’s director of peace and justice ministries closely paralleled Solheim’s own.“He made the Episcopal News Service ‘the’ source to go to for accurate information,” said Grieves. “He was also a great colleague, and I was so fortunate to travel with him on several occasions when we accompanied the presiding bishop on overseas jaunts.“I especially remember his coverage of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict,” Grieves said. “He helped the church understand the injustice of the occupation through his spot-on reporting.“His byline on a trove of stories is his legacy that will be mined for decades to come, along with the incredible photos he took that also told their own stories,” Grieves added. “Most of all I’ll miss his wit, his straight forward honesty, and his engaging insights into all manner of subjects. He was a great raconteur.”Barbara Braver, whom Solheim succeeded as communication director in the Diocese of Massachusetts, recalled first meeting him through the Associated Church Press, an organization that he served as a volunteer and past president.“Jim insisted on the importance of quotes in his reporting, which not only made for good reading, but also brought the newsmakers to life — and made them accountable for their own words,” said Braver, who retired in 2006 after 18 years as communication assistant in the Presiding Bishop’s Office, serving both Browning and his successor, Frank T. Griswold III.“Jim had opinions, most assuredly, but was never a partisan, holding himself to a high standard of fairness, clarity and impartiality,” she added. “His work was greatly respected by his colleagues in a broad ecumenical network of journalists worldwide, who valued as well his good humor and his friendship.”Griswold recalled how Solheim, “in the midst of highly charged and emotional issues, always managed to remain focused and objective in his reporting. These were important gifts to the church, and signs of his own integrity both as a person and a communicator. He was also immensely wise and able to take a long view of things and, when appropriate, able to view ecclesial goings-on with a sense of humor. Jim was a valued friend and colleague: may he rest in peace and rise in glory.”Jerry Hames, editor of the church’s official newspaper Episcopal Life, formerly The Episcopalian, from 1990-2007, said that he “prized the opportunity to work alongside Jim” whom he described as “a professional in every way, dealing skillfully with the secular media, responding quickly to and interpreting accurately — often under difficult circumstances — the many complex issues that confronted the church over the years he served as its news director.”Solheim was “highly regarded, not only by communicators within the Episcopal Church, but also by his colleagues in ecumenical circles and the secular media,” said Hames. “He was often the first point of contact for religion writers of such publications as Time magazine and the New York Times when they needed background or an official comment for an article.“I know I speak for many others whose publications also benefited from his direction and leadership of the news service, his personal support for our work and the integrity by which he carried out his responsibilities.”President of the House of Deputies Gay Jennings said that Solheim “was a great journalist and an even better human being. He will be deeply missed by many in the Episcopal Church and beyond. May he go from strength to strength in the life of perfect service.”Bonnie Anderson, former House of Deputies president, said: “Jim contributed his many skills and gifts to the work of God’s church and was a strong, creative and professional advocate for journalistic excellence and truth-telling. He could always be counted on to brief Executive Council accurately and report with the same sense of clarity and fairness.”In Massachusetts, Solheim served as editor of the diocesan paper, Episcopal Times, in addition to his work as communication director under the administration of then-Bishop David E. Johnson.Solheim brought to this diocesan work wide experience in religious journalism. He was the founding editor and designer of Event, a monthly magazine dealing with social issues (1968-74); associate editor of A.D. Magazine (1977-83); editor of World Encounter (1984-88), and associate director of interpretation for the world mission office of the Lutheran Church in America. He was, starting in 1983, editor of Grapevine, the monthly newsletter of the Joint Strategy and Action Committee (JSAC), a coalition of the national mission agencies of 14 Protestant churches.Born May 16, 1939 in Thief River Falls, Minnesota, Solheim was a graduate of St. Olaf College in Northfield, and held graduate degrees from Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, and Columbia University in New York.Jim is survived by his mother, Verna Solheim Kaisler of Thief River Falls, Minnesota; brothers Ron Solheim of Fergus Falls, Minnesota, and Rod Kaisler, Eagle, Indiana; sisters Jill Kaisler Kezar of Thief River Falls, Minnesota, and Ardeth Kaisler Lewon of Surprize, Arizona; and three nieces and six nephews and their families.Memorial services in New Jersey and Minnesota will be private. A remembrance will be offered by the Episcopal Communicators at its 2013 conference in San Diego.— Robert Williams is canon for community relations in the Diocese of Los Angeles. In 2004 he succeeded Solheim as director of the Episcopal News Service. Cynthia Astle says: August 9, 2012 at 10:33 pm I’m shocked and saddened at the news of Jim Solheim’s passing. Aside from all the other accolades listed here, Jim once gave me a charming lesson in how to pack for the road. He was a shining light of religion journalism and his contributions are countless. We have lost a genuine exemplar of both faith and vocation. Rest in peace, and may light perpetual shine upon you, Jim. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Oeivind Oestang says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Christopher Bugbee says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID David Harris says: Bruce Campbell says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs August 9, 2012 at 10:47 am What a terrible shock. Jim without question lived the well-lived life. The highest praise I can give him is that he was the consummate teacher: he taught not by intent but by generously displaying his learning. Everyone who worked with Jim learned from him, not only from his professionalism but from his heart. Plus, he could whip you on a golf course and smile and make you feel good about it. Via con Dios, brother. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Horace Beasley says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME August 10, 2012 at 10:54 pm I knew Jim from “all sides.” We worked together in Lutheran communications and when I was a reporter for secular newspapers, he was one of those honest, reliable communicators who knew what reporters wanted and how to get it to us. He cared about the Church, he cared about honest communications and he cared about the people around him. He was a blessing. I am sad to hear of his death. When I think of people in church communications who “got it right,” he is always on the list.Charles Austinformer director of News, Lutheran Church in AmericaFormer reporter, The New York Times, Religion News Service, The Record, Hearst News Service. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA August 10, 2012 at 12:51 am God Bless you Jim. You were a consummate journalist, but even more a wonderful human being. God smiled upon us through you. And we return the favor. Blessings brother. See you on the other side. Rector Pittsburgh, PA August 10, 2012 at 1:09 pm I first encountered Jim Solheim at the 2003 Minneapolis General Convention when I was a reporter for Canada’s Anglican Journal. I was so impressed – he was a real pro, knew what journalists needed and was absolutely trustworthy. I thought the Episcopal Church was fortunate to have a person who could be both an articulate, eloquent spokesperson AND edit a journalistically-solid news service. He was just a great guy. Jim, you are already missed.Solange De Santis(former editor, Episcopal Life) August 12, 2012 at 5:46 pm Gone much too quickly. Was there a deadline the rest of us didn’t know about? I enjoyed meeting up with Jim in several world ports — the back streets of Santiago de Compostela for the Faith and Order conference, Canberra, Australia and Geneva often. He was a tremendous help in covering the Episcopal “heresy” trial in Wilmington, Delaware for this fellow Minnesotan, and a Catholic to boot.Whether I was free-lancing an article for the National Catholic Reporter, the United Methodist Reporter, United Church Observer or whatever, Jim could be counted on to summarize the issues cogently and bring me up to speed on the conference, meeting or controversy we were presently huddled around. May St. Peter smile for Jim’s lens and dish out a good quote too. Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL August 9, 2012 at 2:33 pm Jim managed to be both old school and young at heart; his antic spirit and consummate professionalism inevitably linked in one integrated personality that never failed to raise the spirits of those privileged to call him colleague.May his memory be for a blessing.Chris Press Release Service Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Rev. Stephen R. Weston says: Patricia Lefevere says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rev. Richard Foster says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Chris Glaser says: Mark A. Staples says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH August 9, 2012 at 6:09 pm I never met James Solheim, but must have read much of his ENS work. May he walk in the Glory and Light of God’s peace and his family and friends be consoled in their loss. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Len Freeman says: Rector Tampa, FL John Freed says: Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ August 8, 2012 at 11:33 pm I had the privilege of working with Jim on several occasions, most notably Lambeth 1998. He was indeed a pro. More importantly, he was a fine person and a great friend. I learned so much from him and he was always encouraging about my work. His own skills as a writer, communicator and photographer were amazing. Jim was as fine a friend as one could ever find. I shall miss him deeply.David HarrisPresident, ENI, GenevaPublisher, Presbyterian Record, Toronto Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 August 22, 2012 at 10:46 am Jim’s death grieves me deeply! He interviewed me for an article that never appeared in A.D. magazine, given the politics of the Presbyterian Church at the time, but we always made it a point to have a dinner together at every subsequent General Assembly and compare notes. His sense of humor and great choice of restaurants made such church gatherings more bearable. I thank God for his life, his writings, his laughter, and his way of cheering you up with his smile. August 9, 2012 at 7:16 pm I can’t remember a time in my professional life when I did not know Jim. He was present at most meetings of the National Council of Churches Communication Commission and its news and information committee. Some of the news stories he managed at the EC were above average in controversy and he handled each media inquiry with graciousness and honesty. One year he gave a workshop at the NCC on how to handle “bad news,” and he mentored all us commmunicators. I last saw Jim at breakfast in Zabar’s just before he retired and enjoyed joining him in humorous reminiscences about long forgotten ecumenical headlines. I will miss him terribly. Herb Gunn says: December 7, 2012 at 4:49 pm Just now learning about this. I was privileged to meet Jim in 1998 and was always impressed with his professionalism and high standards. A good man, he will be missed. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ August 10, 2012 at 12:17 pm Jim Solheim, Friend.What a shock to hear this sad, sad news, but bearable and prayerfully received with so many comments from so many people who loved and were befriended by Jim.There was a time when Episcopal News Service broke from the church-pablum that passed as religious news and marketing. Count many among those who learned the difference, then tried to make a difference their own diocesan worlds. Thank you Jim Solheim, friend, teacher and mentor. You are missed and mourned!Herb GunnSent from my iPhone Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group August 11, 2012 at 8:18 am It is not possible to express the role of Jim Solheim in my life. As others have eloquently expressed, he was a good friend. Whether in Philadelphia, Boston or Trenton, Jim was the consummate host. His home was a place of warmth, (you could always find a log on the fire), lively social engagement among his many friends and ample food and drink. Likewise he was a consummate traveler. We spent two wonderful summers exploring the great cities of Italy and the art. music and history found there. He liked to comb the back streets of those cities in search of local and/or regional dishes that would curl your toes and make your hair stand on end. Another summer was spent tearing across the Canadian Maritimes. What fun we had. With Jim’s death there’s a hole in the universe, Yet, I give thanks for his presence in my life and the joy that came from knowing him as a friend. Mike Barwell says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY August 9, 2012 at 5:25 pm Sad news about such a vibrant and talented man. And brave, too, even in the ranks of heaven, for to quote the old Norwegian funeral blessing…“Lo, there do I see my sisters and my brothers.I see the line of my people back to the beginning.They do call to me to take my place in the halls of Valhallawhere the brave may live forever.” Carolyn Purden says: August 9, 2012 at 7:15 pm Jim and I go back to the days when he edited World Encounter magazine and I was features editor for The Lutheran. He was a dearest friend and colleague. Thankfully we renewed our friendship briefly this spring when we served as judges for this year’s Wilbur Awards for articles on religious topics produced by secular periodicals. We promised to remain in touch, but at least we had that time. Jim was a fussy editor and writer in the very best sense. He truly was one of my closest colleagues at that time. And he had a uniquely dry wit. Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK August 9, 2012 at 8:19 pm Jim was a wonderful colleague, good friend, superb news writer and photographer, great traveler.I will miss him. Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Philip E. Jenks says: Ian T. Douglas says: Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing August 11, 2012 at 11:33 am Jim was a dear friend, an incredible professional, and a deeply faithful brother in Christ. He will be sorely missed. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Solange De Santis says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Mary Lynn Hendrickson says: Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Comments (1) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] As the shadows lengthened on a brilliant spring Auckland afternoon, and a gentle breeze sighed through the new leaves of the pin oak trees at St. John’s College, Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams paid homage to one of the greatest sons of the church in New Zealand.Sir Paul Reeves – who was bishop, archbishop, governor general of New Zealand, diplomat and advocate for his people – died in August 2011.Maori tikanga, or custom, requires that whanau (family) and friends return to their loved one’s gravesite at the end of a year of mourning to unveil a headstone, and to mark a new beginning for those left behind.In this case, that year became a year and a bit – so that the archbishop of Canterbury could be present at St. John’s College, where Reeves is buried, to attend the unveiling of his kohatu, or headstone, and to pay tribute to a man he has described as a personal hero.This was a sweet and poignant service – which seemed to blend the best that Anglicanism can bring, with the longing and dignity of tikanga Maori, or Maori culture.Because those are the worlds that Reeves – a prince of the church who belonged to the Te Atiawa tribe – had occupied.And in a mark of almost extraordinary empathy, this Welsh-born archbishop of Canterbury began his homily by quoting from the modern Maori poet, Glenn Colquhoun:The art of walking upright here, Is the art of using both feet. One is for holding on. One is for letting go.He then proceeded to give a brief and poignant meditation on how God has ordained ‘doubleness’ in life – “two eyes, two ears, two hands, two feet, two heart valves – things come in two’s” – and how Reeves had mastered the necessary art of living “a holy and double life.”Reeves had had to master the art of living double to an extraordinary level, Williams said: true to his Maori roots, yet representing “the establishment.”“Somebody whose mission and calling was all about taking people seriously…“And somebody who, miraculously failed to take himself at all seriously.“That wonderful doubleness of life is part of what we are celebrating today.”That doubleness of life, the archbishop reflected, “takes us right to the heart of creation and redemption.”He spoke of the “miraculous duality by which God works in us… inhabiting our humanity – and bringing to it the utter strangeness of divinity.”“The ultimate double life,” he said, “is that of Christ himself. So as we give thanks, with great joy, for Paul Reeves’ life, his calling, his witness, his service and his gift to this community, we pray for God to give us the grace of double life.”“The grace of being serious and not serious. The grace of being human and open to the divine. The grace of inhabiting heaven and earth, our own cultures and the stranger’s life,” he added. “Standing upright. And Paul was nothing, if not an upright man. Standing upright on both feet. Holding on, and letting go.”The archbishop’s kauwhau, or sermon, clearly struck a chord with those gathered.Three Maori kaumatua, or elders, spoke after the homily – and each picked up on the challenges of living in a bicultural world: of being true to their Maoritanga, or heritage, while navigating through the Western world.Archbishop David Moxon, senior bishop of the New Zealand dioceses, later spoke of being moved by the simplicity of the unveiling service – it was less than 60 minutes – and how in tune he felt that was with the latter days of Reeves’ life.Reeves had told Moxon that the older he got, the simpler and less complicated his faith had become – and the stronger he held to those simple truths.And Moxon mused too about how a man who is Welsh, and a fluent speaker of the Welsh language, could speak so perceptively of the life and challenges of another bicultural man, born on the other side of the world. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Alda Morgan says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Consultative Council, center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA By Lloyd AshtonPosted Oct 26, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK October 26, 2012 at 4:44 pm Reading this brought tears to my eyes–tears of gratitude for two such souls as Paul Reeves and Rowan Williams. How fortunate we Anglicans are to have their witness and ministries among us! And I’m thinking how fitting for these times are Rowan’s quoting from the Maori poet’s lines about holding on and letting go. Just such “doubleness” is what we face and I hope we can walk that path as well as these two men. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service New Zealand: Archbishop of Canterbury commemorates Sir Paul Reeves An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Archbishop of Canterbury Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls John C. Cain, Jr. helps a man choose reading glasses during a medical clinic at Santo Tomas Episcopal Church in Guatier, Dominican Republic. Cain is part of a medical team from upstate New York that is running a medical clinic March 3-7 at the church. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic] Two hours. That’s how long it took a medical mission team from upstate New York to set up its clinic at Santo Tomas, an Episcopal Church in Gautier.The mission, now in its 16th year, runs like clockwork in the former sugarcane community located not far from the popular tourist beach in Boca Chica.Patients arrive with problems including high blood pressure, respiratory trouble, gastrointestinal difficulties, skin rashes, diabetes. A visit can take between three and four hours, depending on the number of patients awaiting treatment; the team typically sees between 1,000 and 1,500 patients during the five-day clinic.Upon entering the clinic, a patient visits a registration table, where forms are issued. Intake follows, where weight and blood pressure are measured. Then Rita Bush, a dietician and diabetes educator from Malta, New York, pricks the fingers of those wishing to have their blood sugar tested. Many patients have high blood pressure and diabetes, and many go without medication.If a person has fasted, normal blood sugar, or glucose, levels range between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter. If a person has eaten, you might see 130 milligrams. Anything over 160 indicates diabetes. On the morning on March 3, two patients had blood sugar levels of 500 milligrams, one of them an insulin-dependent child, said Bush.Rita Bush, a dietician and diabetes counselor, tests a patient’s blood sugar during the first day of the medical clinic at Santo Tomas in Gautier. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceAfter these preliminary checks, the patient waits to see a doctor or physician assistant before visiting the pharmacy. The final stop is a prayer station to receive, not only prayers, but also a care package with soap, toothpaste and other practical personal-hygiene items.“For some of these people, it’s the only time [during the year] they see a doctor,” said Kevin Bolan, a physician assistant from Newcomb, New York. As the week progresses, he added, people arrive at the clinic from further and further away.The upstate New York team’s journey began around 2:30 a.m. on Feb. 28 when the members boarded a bus bound for John F. Kennedy International Airport at St. Eustace Episcopal Church in Lake Placid. Besides their personal luggage, they brought 40 large plastic bins filled with supplies and medication.Just as the New York group arrived in the Dominican Republic, another medical mission team from North Carolina was traveling back to Santo Domingo from Jimaní, a border town where it had spent the week operating a clinic out of San Pablo Apostol, another Episcopal Church.It was the first time Giga Smith, a registered nurse and member of Christ Church in New Bern, North Carolina, joined a medical mission team.“I’ve always wanted to do this,” she said. “At first it felt very emotional, but then I got into the mindset that I was going to do all I could.”Dr. Richard Taft of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Greenville, North Carolina, treats a young patient during a medical clinic at San Pablo Apostol in Jimaní. A medical team from North Carolina ran a clinic out of the church Feb. 24-27.Jimaní, population 13,000, is one of two main border crossings between the Dominican Republic and its neighbor to the west, Haiti. In four days, the team treated 716 people, ranging in age from 22 months to 90 years. A local Haitian doctor was on hand throughout the clinic and will provide follow-up care for the patients.“In giving of their time, the teams are showing an example of God’s love to all humanity,” said Karen Carroll, an Episcopal Church-appointed missionary serving the Diocese of the Dominican Republic.To administer medical care in the Dominican Republic, professionals must provide valid credentials and a list of all medications, including expiration dates, lot numbers and intended uses, to Carroll, who files the appropriate paperwork with the public heath ministry.In total, 14 U.S.-based medical mission teams will travel to the Dominican Republic in 2014, up from nine teams in 2013, said Carroll.It’s as much about being a Christian mission and accompanying the Dominican church as it is about providing medical care, say team members.“First and foremost, we are a Christian mission,” said Connie Reynolds, a licensed practical nurse and a Baptist member of the upstate New York team. “And then a medical mission.”Connie Reynolds, an LPN, and Laura Bolan, who plans to become a physician assistant, measured medication in the pharmacy at Santo Tomas Episcopal Church in Gautier. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceStill the doctors, nurses, dieticians and physical therapists provide medical care to many poor and impoverished people who otherwise might fall through the cracks of the country’s public-health system.In 2001, the Dominican Republic approved health-care reforms aimed at providing universal coverage to its citizens. The implementation, however, has been lacking, with rural areas lagging behind urban areas, and fee-based medical care surpassing the care offered through the public system, according to the World Health Organization.International medical missions are sometimes described as “Band-aides,” with criticisms including foreign practitioners’ disrespect for local health-care providers; missioners’ lack of appropriate cultural practices; teams’ inadequate language skills and interpretation for treating patients in a foreign language; and the high travel costs when funds potentially could be spent in more appropriate ways.Well aware of the criticism, the teams making annual visits to the Dominican Republic say that saving just one life and seeing the overall improvement in health and hygiene in the community from year to year justifies their worth.For instance, a young man came to the clinic in Jimaní on the verge of a diabetic crisis, said Dr. Richard Taft, a retired OBGNY from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Greenville, North Carolina. After receiving insulin, the young man quickly recovered. Another man whose eyelids were swollen shut began an immediate recovery when treated with antibiotics, added Taft.There used to be a large sugar cane plantation in Gautier and many Haitian migrants lived nearby in bateyes like this one. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceGautier has one medical clinic staffed by a doctor; the nearest hospital is 15-20 minutes away by car. Jimaní has a rudimentary hospital that was built in 1948 and is staffed by six general practitioners, two OBGYNs and one general surgeon, according to North Carolina team members who toured the facility.In many ways, said Dr. Allen Van Dyke, an OBGYN from Ashville, North Carolina, “the medical care is relative to the living conditions.”Witnessing the amount of suffering on the border stirred emotions and thoughts about the U.S.-health care system in team members from North Carolina.Anne Bena, a physical therapist, fits a patient with a walker. Before receiving the walker, the patient, who Bena has known for four years, used two crutches to get around. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceIt was hard to reconcile the enormous amount of money spent on medical care in the United States, said Sandy Johnson, a pediatric nurse, with the enormous amount of suffering many people endure.“I don’t know what you do with the disparity,” said Susan Bickery-Mercer, who’d read “Mountains Beyond Mountains,” Tracy Kidder’s biography of Dr. Paul Farmer and his experience providing medical care to people in Haiti, before making the trip.One of the most powerful things Bickery-Mercer, youth minister at St. Paul’s in Greenville, witnessed as part of the team was the ease with which the local people share their lives.When people are clearly suffering and in need, the connection tends to be at the heart level, she said. It was something Taft sensed as well, and added, that for Christians, ritual Sunday worship can sometimes become a blinder to the Spirit.“To see the rawness of life is a very powerful thing,” said Taft. “Getting out of your comfort zone allows you to step back and reflect. That’s the essence of mission.“We just happen to do it with medicine.”Back in Gautier, community residents must travel either to Boca Chica or Santo Domingo to visit a hospital, said Ermita Reyes, a community and church leader, and even though the hospital in Boca Chica is just a short distance away, it can cost a life.“Their [the team’s] presence is an example of the grace of God in the community,” she said.Savannah Gordon registers a patient on the March 3, the first day of the five-day medical clinic at Santo Tomas. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe New York team’s medical clinic is the only full medical clinic to visit the community annually, said Connie Reynolds, the LPN, who brings her daughter, Savannah Gordon, along to help out.It was the fifth time Gordon, a college student, took part in the medical mission.“After the first year, I came back a different person,” she said. “It’s humbling to see how people live and be part of the community and develop friendships.“It’s heartbreaking to come back and learn that someone has died.”Kevin Bolan’s daughter also accompanies him. Laura Bolan recently graduated with a master’s degree in public health and plans to follow her father’s example and become a physician assistant. To her, the need for more frequent clinics and follow-up trips, as well as efforts toward disease mitigation, are obvious.“It would be great if we could partner with another group and come down every six months,” she said.Paul Gutmann and Domingo de la Rosa display the three-bucket water filtration system. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe care packages, providing soap and toothpaste, and the clean-water bucket-filtration system that Paul Gutmann provides are important because many of the problems people present with come from drinking parasite-infected water and poor personal hygiene, said Laura Bolan.Gutmann works with a local contact to distribute the filtration systems. Each unit costs about $33, but Gutmann raises money and contributes his own money to make them affordable. He may not have high success rates now, but he hopes the next generation, one that has grown up knowing the risks of drinking contaminated water, will begin to filter its own water, he said.With 40 bins of supplies and medication, each weighing between 40 and 50 pounds, the New York medical team brings enough medication to leave behind to be distributed by a nurse working locally. Patients leave the clinic with three months’ worth and can return for follow-up tests and more medication, as needed.“The challenge is leaving them with enough medication,” said Kevin Bolan, who already had been thinking about organizing a skeleton crew to return and run a clinic over Labor Day weekend. “It’s a work in progress; we have to figure out what works.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service.  Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 6, 2014 July 31, 2017 at 3:33 pm Is this clinic still up and running? I do mission work in the DR and we have a boy who we are trying to get in to school. The medical analysis done by the school said he cannot start because he has “an amoeba and dirty blood”.We have found we cannot trust hardly anyone: lawyers, pastors, doctors, vets, etc. One doctor has told us it will cost $600 to treat this boy, but he refuses to tell us what medicine he will use to treat him. He is also saying the boy will have to be brought to him twice a day for treatment.Can you help us?? Press Release Service Comments (4) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Medical missions provide care for Dominicans, Haitians Church-run clinics help fill the health-care gap Joyce Burt says: TR Shively, DDS says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA March 6, 2014 at 5:34 pm Where is the dental component of the health care mission? Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET March 6, 2014 at 10:57 am per you previous published item se also the wonderful work being organized by Rev Clelia https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2013/07/10/haiti-medical-missions-best-practices-symposium/ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Haiti Medical Missions, Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Roy Talbot says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Province IX Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Latin America, Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Haiti, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY March 7, 2014 at 12:42 am Can someone get me the information on the three bucket water filtering system???? Please! The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA AliceMarie Slaven-Emond,RN,MS, FNP-C says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Por Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted Jul 2, 2015 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Chuck Stewart, diputado de Nueva York Central, estudia el presupuesto junto con su colega diputada, Rda. Georgina Hegney. Foto de Tracy Sukraw/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] El Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas (PB&F) propuso el 1 de julio un presupuesto para la Iglesia Episcopal en el trienio 2016-2018 que incluye una nueva e importante iniciativa de $2 millones para justicia y reconciliación raciales, al tiempo que reduce la cantidad de dinero que se les pide a las diócesis que contribuyan a un 15 por ciento para 2018.El presupuesto trienal 2016-2018 se basa en un ingreso de $122.243.102 para el trienio que termina el 31 de diciembre de este año. El comité proyectó gastos de $122.189.125. Por consiguiente, el presupuesto trae un superávit de $70.834, una cifra que el comité en el texto del presupuesto calificó de “insignificante en vista de las múltiples predicciones [que se presentan] en un presupuesto de tres años”.El comité presentó el presupuesto en una sesión conjunta el 1 de julio. Tanto la Cámara de Obispos como la Cámara de Diputados deben aprobar el presupuesto, conviniendo en cualesquiera cambios apoyados por una o por la otra.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori abrió la sesión con una oración: “Nos hemos reunido aquí para considerar la mejor manera de usar los recursos que nos has dado para la obra de tu mundo restituido. Mantennos receptivos de corazón y mente y espíritu para que podamos discernir la dirección de tu Espíritu”.El obispo Stephen Lane, de la Diócesis de Maine y vicepresidente del PB&F, dijo a la sesión conjunta que el proceso presupuestario, diseñado conjuntamente por el PB&F y el Consejo Ejecutivo, era “colaborativo y amistoso [y]… era bueno para el PB&F y bueno para la Iglesia”.El presupuesto está disponible como un PDF aquí en inglés y en español.Los estímulos para la iniciativa de justicia y reconciliación raciales del presupuesto provienen de la Resolución C019 que le pide a la Iglesia que responda a la injusticia racial sistémica y solicita $1,2 millones para esa tarea.“Fue el sentir del comité (PB&F) que —dada la atmósfera en que vivimos ahora con los atentados y las dificultades que enfrentan los afroamericanos— queríamos hacer más”, dijo a ENS la Rda. Mally Lloyd, de Massachusetts, presidente del PB&F, el día antes de que se presentara el presupuesto. “Denles $2 millones y una pizarra en blanco para que realmente traten de hacer algo nuevo para la Iglesia que esperamos tendrá un impacto importante”.Lloyd dijo que el comité decidió no ocuparse de las dimensiones del trabajo “para que el movimiento del Espíritu” guíe a los líderes de la Iglesia.Los $2 millones provendrá de las reservas de corto plazo de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS) y forma parte del superávit de $4,7 millones con el cual se predijo que terminaría el trienio 2013-2015.“Estamos corriendo un riesgo como Iglesia de no tener una emergencia que precise 0recurrir a esas reservas”, dijo Lane a ENS. “Vemos esto como una circunstancia extraordinaria y una oportunidad extraordinaria y, por consiguiente, estamos usando medios extraordinarios para sostenerla”.Supuestos ingresosEl presupuesto supone el ingreso de $76,6 millones en compromisos de las diócesis de la Iglesia (renglón 2), aproximadamente $2,1 millones más de lo proyectado en el trienio actual. Cerca del 62 por ciento de los ingresos del presupuesto provienen de las promesas de las diócesis y zonas regionales de misión de la Iglesia. La contribución real en el trienio actual se espera que ascienda a $79,3 millones.Sarah Neumann, diputada de Massachusetts, estudia el presupuesto por vía de la carpeta virtual en su iPad. Foto de Tracy Sukraw/ENS.La contribución anual de cada año en el presupuesto de tres años se basa en el ingreso de una diócesis dos años antes, menos $120.000. A esas entidades se les pide actualmente que contribuyan con un 19 por ciento de sus ingresos de dos años antes, menos $120.000.El presupuesto que el PB&F propone aumenta esa exención a $150.000. Su proyección de ingresos se basa en solicitar de las diócesis de la Iglesia y sus zonas de misión regionales que contribuyan con un 18 por ciento de sus ingresos para financiar el presupuesto de 2016, un 16,5 por ciento para el presupuesto de 2017 y un 15 por ciento en 2018.Lloyd y Lane dijeron que el PB&F cree que el anteproyecto presupuestario del Consejo Ejecutivo para el trienio 2016-2018 se basaba en un investigación sólida cuando llegó a predecir cómo las contribuciones diocesanas responderían a una solicitud reducida. Lane dijo que él y el obispo de Ohio, Mark Hollingsworth, que preside el comité del Consejo que redactó el presupuesto dado al PB&F, también llevaron a cabo una encuesta informal de los obispos cuyas diócesis no cumplen con la solicitud del 19 por ciento.“Encontramos un completo apoyo para el objetivo del 15 por ciento”, dijo él. “Encontramos un compromiso sustancial de parte de los que están por debajo del 15 por ciento de moverse en esa dirección en el transcurso del trienio. Tenemos confianza de que el objetivo del 15 por ciento está respaldado sólidamente por los obispos de la Iglesia”.Lloyd añadió que ella cree que hay algunas diócesis “par las cuales este 15 por ciento nunca será alcanzable”. Sin embargo, agregó, el Comité de Revisión de Tasaciones Diocesanas planeado por el Consejo ayudará a que las contribuciones de un porcentaje “realista” de esas diócesis sea visto como “plena participación” en la financiación del presupuesto denominacional, en lugar de sentirse sancionadas y criticadas por no pagar el total de la solicitud.Los ingresos del presupuesto se calculan partiendo del supuesto que aproximadamente un tercio de las diócesis que pagan un 19 por ciento o más decrecerán sus contribuciones para ponerse a la par de la solicitud anual, como aquellas que ahora pagan entre el 19 y el 15 por ciento.Aquellas diócesis que dan menos del 15 por ciento se predice que aumenten su contribución anual dando un mínimo de un diez por ciento de su contribución cada año. Por consiguiente, si una diócesis está pagando un 9 por ciento, aumentará su contribución en el primer año a 9,9 por ciento y así sucesivamente.La proyección de ingresos por concepto de compromisos diocesanos también se basa en que los ingresos percibidos en la esfera diocesana aumenten un medio por ciento, según las notas que aparecen en el renglón 1.A pesar de que hay resoluciones pendientes que piden que las tasaciones [diocesanas] se reduzcan inmediatamente al 15 por ciento, Lloyd dijo que el comité había rechazado tales solicitudes al principio. “Creímos que era una reducción demasiado drástica y demasiado apresurada y que le presentaría al nuevo obispo primado la toma de algunas decisiones difíciles que no parecían justas durante su primer año”, apuntó ella.La solicitud diocesana no es una tasación canónicamente obligatoria y el Equipo de Trabajo para Reinventar la Iglesia Episcopal pidió un cambio en su informe final. La Cámara de Diputados consideró sustituir la Resolución D013 (que ocuparía el lugar de su versión original y también el de las [resoluciones] A008, A110 y A111) y, entre otras cosas, cambiaría el carácter voluntario de la solicitud diocesana por una tasación obligatoria. El PB&F no cuenta con la autoridad para hacer obligatoria la solicitud.De las 109 diócesis y tres zonas regionales, 49 diócesis pagaron la solicitud en su totalidad o más en 2014. Una lista de los compromisos diocesanos y pagos hechos en 2013 y de los compromisos de 2014 puede verse aquí.Los ingresos del presupuesto incluyen también un aporte, o dividendo, del 5 por ciento de los ingresos provenientes de los aproximadamente $220 millones de la DFMS en valores invertidos irrestrictos. Las extracciones ascienden a $28,2 millones, en lugar de los $24,5 millones previstos en el trienio actual (renglón 3).Además de los pagos diocesanos, la aportación del 5 por ciento y las reservas a corto plazo destinadas al programa de justicia racial, otros importantes renglones de ingreso incluyen casi $10 millones por concepto de alquileres [de espacios] en el Centro Denominacional de la Iglesia, $2,1 millones del programa de cobros de préstamos a refugiados del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, una extracción de $1.100.000 para apoyar a la oficina de desarrollo y $1.200.000 en ingresos de la Convención General, junto con otras fuentes más pequeñas.El lado de los gastosLos gastos en el presupuesto 2016-2018 se han estructurado, al igual que en el presupuesto actual, en torno a las Cinco Marcas de la Misión de la Comunión Anglicana.A fin de ajustarse a los requisitos canónicos para asignar gastos en las áreas de programa, canónicos y corporativos, cada renglón de gastos está codificado a uno de esas tres categorías, y la resolución habilitante del presupuesto, que aún no tiene número, resume los gatos de esa manera.Los gastos de programa ascienden a $64,3 millones, los corporativos a $35,2 millones y los canónicos a $22,5 millones. Los montos por cada categoría en cada año se especifican en la resolución del presupuesto.Hay cuatro tipos de asignaciones en el presupuesto que se propone:Subvenciones de desarrollo/sostenibilidad a largo plazo que facilitan asociaciones con diócesis y el resto del mundo.Subvenciones en bloque, cuyo uso lo decide el beneficiario con las auditorías y los informes situacionales que se requieren. Por ejemplo, se han presupuestado $1.500.000 para las diócesis de Alaska, Navajolandia, Dakota del Norte y Dakota del Sur para extender la obra con las poblaciones indígenas. Esas subvenciones representan un aumento en comparación con el trienio actual. El presupuesto incluye su subvención habitual a colegios universitarios tradicionalmente afroamericanos, que esta vez se ha reducido ligeramente a $1.600.000. Sin embargo, hay $400.000 adicionales para repartirse entre los dos centros de estudio ( Augustine’s College en Raleigh, Carolina del Norte, y Voorhees College en Denmark, Carolina del Sur) como subvenciones para el desarrollo, lo cual representa un aumento de $20.000 a la subvención total.Subvenciones de nuevas iniciativas para enfoques experimentales en la edificación del cuerpo de Cristo. La subvención para Justicia y Reconciliación Raciales es uno de ellas.Subvenciones de propósitos especiales para programas específicos con un propósito y un plan. Los $3 millones del trienio actual en subvenciones para Zonas de Empresa de Misión y Comienzo de Nuevas Iglesias son ejemplos de estas subvenciones. El presupuesto que se propone aumenta su financiación en $1 millón.Otros puntos a resaltar del presupuesto$750.000 para evangelización digital se han añadido al presupuesto de comunicaciones en respuesta al compromiso de Michael Curry, el obispo primado electo, con la evangelización (renglón 53b).$1.200.000 como contribución de la Iglesia a la Oficina de la Comunión Anglicana, un aumento de $500.000 (renglón 193).Por primera vez, el presupuesto refleja los costos operativos y el ingreso de00 la junta de la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias (renglones 265-268).$1.100.000 (un aumento de $257.357) para el renglón 281a, (llamado anteriormente de Comités, Comisiones, Agencias y Juntas, y llamado ahora Organismos Interinos). El presupuesto asume una reducción de un tercio en el número de organismos interinos y reduce en un tercio a los miembros de cada uno de esos organismos, pero aumenta la financiación disponible para las reuniones o encuentros personales.$300.000 para la preparación en el uso de los cánones disciplinarios del clero, Título IV de los Cánones de la Iglesia (renglón 281b).Lloyd y Lane dijeron que apreciaban enormemente que tantas resoluciones que conllevaban financiación hubieran comenzado a moverse muy temprano a través de la Convención, ayudando así al proceso presupuestario del comité.“Lo más difícil en un presupuesto operativo es reservar fondos para empeños nuevos y me siento particularmente gratificado que Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas haya sido creativo y emprendedor en buscar modos de unificar recursos y en consecuencia este presupuesto sí ha contemplado de manera significativa [la inclusión] de nuevas tareas al tiempo de tratar de ser fiel al programa y estructura de la Iglesia Episcopal”, afirmó Lane.Cualquier cambio en esa estructura promulgado por la Convención General “podría significar que el Consejo Ejecutivo tendrá que tomar el presupuesto que hemos aprobado y cambiarlo hasta un punto cual nunca antes ha tenido que hacerse”, reconoció Lloyd.El PB&F tuvo que funcionar en conformidad con los cánones actuales, dijo ella, y no podía prever cambios canónicos.“Siempre supimos que si la restructuración hubiera sido aprobada el segundo día [de la Convención] los cánones no habrían entrado en vigor hasta el 1 de enero, de manera que tuvimos que producir un presupuesto basado en el viejo modelo canónico”, apuntó.El comité dijo en el texto que acompañaba las hojas de cálculo del presupuesto que se siente agradecido de que: los miembros del PB&F participaran en la creación del proceso que el Consejo Ejecutivo utilizó para crear su anteproyecto del presupuesto; de que los miembros fueran bienvenidos en todas las reuniones del Consejo y de que el Consejo compartiera [con el comité] la reacción que había solicitado de toda la Iglesia.“La actitud colaborativa asumida por el Consejo Ejecutivo produjo un presupuesto convincente y balanceado”, dijo el comité en su texto. “Sin embargo, un presupuesto tan estrictamente balanceado no permite cambios fáciles. Grandes asignaciones en respuesta a la legislación resultan aun difíciles de contemplar”.El texto del PB&F sugiere que el Consejo considera asignar una partida en bloque, sin especificar, de $2 a $5 millones en su anteproyecto presupuestario 2019-2021 al objeto de darle al PB&F mayor flexibilidad para responder a “las necesidades y las prioridades de la Convención General”.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA General Convention 2015 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID La obra en pro de la justicia racial es el plato fuerte del presupuesto 2016-2018 El comité propone reducir la solicitud diocesana al 15 por ciento en el transcurso de tres años Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC General Convention, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Vikki MyersPosted Dec 13, 2016 Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Nancy Mott says: December 13, 2016 at 4:15 pm Hey, I’m so proud of St. Peter’s Episcopal School! Not just being the first in Tennessee to offer Spanish immersion program! but also that it’s in the Diocese of East Tennessee. It appears to me Tennessee schools, public and private, have not only been slow to offer services to our growing Hispanic population but also slow to provide adequate second language programs., which as Ms. Myers points out is a significant advantage to our youth.And for parents worried about students being “behind” in content subjects, from everything I’ve read about experimental programs in California, even if there’s a bit of a lag in early grades, students have not only caught up by sixth grade but are actually ahead of their mono-lingual peers. Bravo, St. Peter’s! Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (2) Susan Delgado-Park says: Comments are closed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Monica Griffin, Spanish-language immersion curriculum coordinator and preschool lead teacher at St. Peter’s School in Chattanooga, has “circle time” with children in immersion Kindergarten classroom. Photo: St. Peter’s School[Episcopal Church in East Tennessee] ¡Hola! (Hello!) 15 kindergarteners call out as a visitor walks into their classroom – as much in unison as kindergarteners can be. The children are having “circle time,” sitting in a circle on a rug with Lead Teacher Betsy Cake.Cake introduces the visitor, then claps her hands to the rhythm of a song to keep the children’s attention. “Vamos a cantar la cancion de hoy, (Let’s sing today’s song)” she says and she and the children sing “Si usted esta feliz apaluda las fuerte … (If you’re happy, clap your hands).” Then the children say together “¡Me allegro de verte! (I’m glad to see you!)”This is the kindergarten Spanish-language immersion class at St. Peter’s Episcopal School in Chattanooga, Tennessee.In 2015, St. Peter’s became the first school in the state to implement a 100-percent Spanish-language immersion program. It is Chattanooga’s first and only elementary school that offers a language immersion track alongside its classic curriculum.Head of School Meredith Ruffner provides a framework in the school’s mission for why the Spanish-immersion program is important to the school. “Our mission is a love of learning, joy of service and a lively faith. We feel that a global heart and a global mind goes right in with that because we’re wanting to instill in our children a desire to help and serve and interact with people, not just in their community, but all over,” she said.Ruffner, who became head of school four years ago had a vision for a Spanish-language immersion program at St. Peter’s so a team was formed to look into it.There were questions about whether Chattanooga was ready for a program like this and whether parents would embrace it, but “the more we talked about it, the more impressed we were with how it fit our mission as an Episcopal school. We just felt it was what our school needed,” Ruffner said.Sarah Steffner, president of the Board of Trustees at the time, said, “Our team was doing a lot of research and through God and serendipity, a teacher was leaving as Monica Griffin [Spanish-immersion curriculum coordinator] found the school.”We decided that if we were going to do this, we would need to do it right,” Ruffner said. The team found add.a.lingua, an education consultant company that helps schools implement a second language in the school. Ruffner and Griffin spent several days at the company’s headquarters in Grand Rapids, Michigan, to talk with people at the company and tour schools that were already working with the program. They liked add.a.lingua’s philosophy and comprehensive program. St. Peter’s is now partnering with the company.Two years ago, St. Peter’s began offering the immersion program to three-year-olds as “kind of an experiment,” a pilot program, to see how it would go. Steffner said, “It was kind of tricky. Between spring and fall the whole thing changed.”It turned out to be a success all around. After an initial “bump,” students and parents loved it.“We are fortunate that our board and parent-teacher organization are very supportive of it, but some of the parents initially had qualms about the program,” Ruffner said.“We found out approximately a month before school started; we had so many questions and fears,” said Brandy Biederman, a St. Peter’s parent. “We had no clue what Spanish immersion was. I was and am very outspoken and immediately asked for meetings to answer our questions. This was our baby girl and we were going to throw her into an unknown setting with unknown people and an unknown language. Had it not have been for Meredith [Ruffner], we wouldn’t have done it. We trust her, always have.” Biederman says she and her husband are now the biggest fans for Spanish immersion at St. Peter’s.Ruffner said, “There isn’t a large Hispanic population in Chattanooga and the vast majority of students are not connected to Hispanic culture at all – the parents just see the value in learning a second language. We talked a lot with our parents in the community about what the research says about children’s minds, and what is best for them as they grow and develop. Language is at the top of the list.”The goal is that when the children graduate from fifth grade, they’re completely bilingual – able to read, write, and do math in both English and Spanish. Ruffner said that those skills are transferrable, so whatever skills they’re learning in Spanish, they’re transferring to English.Ruffner said “About midway through the first year, the school started talking with parents about their thoughts for the next year to see if they wanted to go into our regular junior kindergarten 4-year-old class and everybody was saying, ‘We want immersion.’ This year, that class has moved up to kindergarten. Now we have three full classes.”Teachers are native Spanish speakers and the children quickly learn the most common things they need to know, such as the names of things in the classroom, words for quieting down, sussuren, and words for if they need to go the bathroom. In class, they have a normal kindergarten curriculum – including learning numbers, letters and songs. Signs hanging in the kindergarten classroom – abrir la puerta (open the door), and ayudar con el bocatillo (help with the snack) – remind students to be polite and to help their teacher and their classmates.Most parents and siblings speak English at home, but pick up Spanish from the young children in the immersion classes.Biederman said, “We only speak what we have learned from them. It’s definitely interesting how much we have picked up and don’t realize. Our grocery app is through Amazon’s Alexa and when I pull it up, most of the items are in Spanish because that’s how we say it for her to order it. I didn’t even realize that until now,” she said.The Rev. Quinn Parman, whose son is in the program, said in a new video, “We love stories – and you can tell as you’re reading that there’s nothing missed. He gets the stories and he understands them. The fact that he knows Spanish and learns English at home does not in any way hamper our ability to do that – in fact, it probably amplifies what he’s doing in school.”“The time I notice him growing the most in Spanish is when I see him teaching his sister. I’ll hear them playing and sometimes when I hear them playing restaurant, there’s a couple foods I’ll hear him saying in Spanish as well,” said Quinn Parman in the video.Griffin said, “We have a lot of older siblings in my class. Their parents send me videos all the time about them playing and being on the playground and in the playroom and reading to their younger siblings – it’s adorable to see.”Biederman said that add.a.lingua and St. Peter’s are very open to meetings and discussions. “I have access to Monica [Griffin], Meredith [Ruffner] and all of the teachers as needed. We have frequent evaluations as well. So parents can ensure that their child’s educational needs and parents’ expectations are supported in the program,” she said.Biederman voices the hope that other parents also have for their children, “We hope this is a springboard for them to learn even more languages in middle/high school. We also hope this opens up limitless opportunities for their career choices.”She notes that although some parents prefer the classic curriculum for their children, “We are the biggest fans for Spanish immersion at St. Peter’s,” Biederman said. “As parents, we are constantly looking for ways to give our children every advantage, St. Peter’s provides just that. By the children learning in another language, our hopes are that they will learn to process complex issues with a greater ease. My two children will leave fifth grade bilingual and fluent. That’s a life altering skill that will provide leverage throughout their life,” she said.“I feel very proud of my son, that he’s learning a new language and that he’s growing in new ways,” said Rachelle Parman said.Quinn Parman said, “I really hope this gives [my son] a drive to want to connect and make the world a better place.”– Vikki Myers is communications director for the Diocese of East Tennessee. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Chattanooga Episcopal school first in Tennessee to offer full Spanish-language immersion Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH December 26, 2016 at 3:56 pm Having lived in Honduras for 18 years and worked with several of the bilingual Episcopal Schools there for many years, I am delighted to see St Peter’s pursuing the idea of a bilingual school program. In Honduras, we start our preschoolers in immersion programs of English for three years before they began their Spanish studies in elementary school. They use US textbooks for their English classes and Spanish language textbooks for their Spanish classes concurrently. Now our schools go through High School and our children graduate bilingual and bi-cultural.Our high schoolers often help translate for visiting teams which has enabled many of them to know other parts of the country as well as learn how many of their fellow Hondurans live. Many of those students have gone on to study the fields they helped to translate for–teachers, doctors, nurses, dentists, and architects. They will indeed find it a blessing. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

first_img Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Members of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Wheeling, West Virginia, participate Dec. 3 in an Advent procession of lessons and carols. Photo: St. Matthew’s, via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] An Episcopal church’s century-old tradition of playing secret Santa for West Virginia children has received national recognition, including a mention this week by the White House.St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Wheeling, West Virginia, made local headlines after it paid the Walmart layaway balances on toys for several families in its community. The congregation had intended to remain anonymous, but word got out after news of the donations spread on social media.“It’s just such a blessing and I don’t know if words can really describe how grateful we are and so very happy that someone would do something like this,” Nathan Robinson, whose family was one of those benefiting from the layaway payoffs, told WTRF-TV.The Rev. Mark Seitz, rector at St. Matthew’s, said the tradition is rooted in the grief of a local family who lost a daughter to illness more than 100 years ago. They gave the church an endowment in their daughter’s memory to be used each year to brighten the season for families in need.“The criteria for this was that the people had to be residents of Ohio County, either Wheeling or Triadelphia, and they needed to have children,” Seitz told WTRF-TV. “They needed to be buying toys.”The church paid off about $5,000 in layaway balances in late November, helping several families who live in the area. About 50 accounts were paid off by the church, a Walmart store manager told The Intelligencer and Wheeling News-Register, and the newspaper articles added that a White House representative reached out to Seitz on Dec. 5 for more information.White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders recognized the church’s good deeds at the beginning of her daily press briefing on Dec. 7.“St. Matthew’s Church wasn’t looking for credit and neither are so many others,” Sanders said. “But these stories are important because they remind us what this season is all about, and that’s the greatest gift of all, that a savior was born, and hopefully we can all focus and take time out of our busy schedules to enjoy the Christmas season or however you may celebrate.”The church pays for the toys each year with interest on the endowment initially established by U.S. Sen. Nathan Scott and his wife in memory of their daughter, Daisy, The Intelligencer and Wheeling News-Register reported. Scott, a prominent local businessman, represented West Virginia as a Republican from 1899 to 1911.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Tags Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL West Virginia church pays off families’ toy layaway bills, receives praise from White House Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By David PaulsenPosted Dec 8, 2017 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Faith & Politics Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Church leaders reaffirm need for mental-health crisis training after NYPD officer acquitted in killing of Episcopalian Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC By Amy SowderPosted Feb 15, 2018 Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Deborah Danner, a lifelong Episcopalian, died in a police shooting in October 2016. Photo courtesy of Church of the Heavenly Rest[Episcopal News Service] A judge ruled Feb. 15 that New York Police Department Sgt. Hugh Barry was not guilty of all charges related to the death of Deborah Danner, a lifelong Episcopalian.Barry shot and killed a bat-wielding Danner, who has a long history of mental illness, in her Bronx, New York, apartment in October 2016. His bench trial at Bronx Criminal Court was on charges of murder, manslaughter and criminally negligent homicide.Danner, 66, attended several Episcopal churches throughout Manhattan over the years. She suffered from diagnosed paranoid schizophrenia for decades with repeat hospitalizations, and was having an episode that prompted security guards to call the police.At the time of the shooting, she was holding a baseball bat, and Barry testified Feb. 13 that he feared for his life. “I just see the bat swinging and that’s when I fired,” he said, according to the New York Times. Then he added, “I’m looking at this bat that can crack me in the head and kill me.”Prosecutors had argued that she was not enough of a threat and Barry did not follow police procedure. On cross-examination, the Times said, lead prosecutor, Wanda Perez-Maldonado, elicited that Barry had not followed his training and appeared to ignore many of the department’s protocols. For instance, he left a shield and restraining straps for dealing with disturbed people in his car. She suggested that Barry had rushed to subdue Danner instead of isolating her and waiting her out.Justice Robert A. Neary of State Supreme Court said that the prosecution failed to prove that Barry was “not justified in the use of deadly physical force,” the Times reported.Since the trial began Jan. 30, Episcopalians, those who knew Danner and those who did not, have been attending the trial and focusing on what they can do to help change police procedures and training for handling people with mental illness.Lucas Pershing, program manager for action and advocacy at Trinity Church Wall Street, one of the churches Danner attended, was one of the leaders in the effort to show support for Danner and anyone who has mental illness. Members of Church of the Heavenly Rest and St. Mary’s in Harlem were among the churches who had representatives. This is not only a New York issue, but an issue for Episcopalians across all of the communities in the United States and beyond, church leaders said.The Rt. Rev. Andrew Dietsche, bishop of the Diocese of New York, other Episcopalians and supporters attended the Bronx criminal trial of Sgt. Hugh Barry, who was acquitted Feb. 15, 2018, on all charges in the October 2016 death of Deborah Danner, a lifelong Episcopalian. Photo courtesy of Trinity Church Wall StreetThe Chapel of All Saints in Trinity Church planned a Service of Comfort Feb. 15, regardless of the verdict. The service was to provide a moment to remember Danner and pray for everyone involved in this tragedy: “her family and friends, the officers, emergency medical technicians, attorneys, court personnel and the judge,” according to an announcement on Trinity’s website.On Feb. 9, Diocese of New York Bishop Andrew Dietsche met with the New York City Mayor’s Office to formally request Crisis Intervention Team training for all NYPD officers by the end of 2018, according to a story on the Trinity website.“We have asked Mayor de Blasio to implement crisis intervention training for all New York City Police Department officers. We believe that if the officers who engaged Deborah 15 months ago had received this training, Deborah might have been spared, and the officer himself, now facing charges of murder, might have been spared,” Dietsche said in the story.Dietsche attended the trial along with more than a dozen other Episcopalians. Black Lives Matter activists attended too.After the verdict, Dietsche wrote that Danner’s tragic case has raised significant and troubling questions of how the city and its institutions deals with people who have a mental illness, especially in times of emotional and mental crisis.Barry’s acquittal should not be taken as a vindication of his actions, the bishop wrote in a statement. “Again, and with urgency, we ask that every officer be trained and ready to engage the mentally ill with compassion, patience and understanding when our police engage our most troubled people in the highly charged moments of a police call,” he said. “The mentally ill cannot be expected to act in reasonable or rational ways in those conflicted encounters, so the police must be.”The Rev. Winnie Varghese, Trinity’s director of justice and reconciliation, wrote a Feb. 7 letter to Trinity’s staff and congregation about the trial and how people could be involved.“Our attendance is prayerful and a witness to the humanity of Deborah. She was a 66-year-old black woman who was sick. The call that resulted in her death was a call for health care, not to report a crime,” Varghese wrote. Her letter ended with: “Mental illness touches all of our lives, and we know we can be a better support to our neighbors in crisis.”Police Commissioner James P. O’Neill said in an email to the police department that the verdict does not “make Deborah Danner’s life any less tragic.” The Sergeants Benevolent Association posted the statement on its Twitter feed.The department and officers individually must be held accountable for their actions, he wrote. And, the department is responsible for training and equipping its offers to handle these kinds of challenges in a measured and appropriate way.“The NYPD’s disciplinary review of the tactical and supervisory decisions leading to the discharge of a firearm in this case will now proceed,” O’Neill said.— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn. She can be reached at [email protected] Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church Property Trustees of the New Zealand Diocese of Christchurch have received a grant equivalent to about $4 million toward the rebuilding of Christchurch Cathedral.The building was all but destroyed in a devastating earthquake in 2011. In September 2017, the Diocesan Synod voted instead to reinstate the cathedral as part of a funding package with local and national government. The new grant is from the Lottery Significant Project’s Fund.Read the full article here. Posted Jun 19, 2018 Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Grant boosts effort to rebuild New Zealand’s Christchurch Cathedral Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Back to Press Releases A statement from the Episcopal churches in Germany on the Yom Kippur attack in Halle Rector Martinsville, VA The Episcopal Church in EuropePosted Oct 14, 2019 Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL center_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Last week, on the holiest day in the Jewish year, a murderous attack took place at a small synagogue in Halle, Germany. Two people unconnected to the synagogue lost their lives in a senseless shooting, one that had as its intended target the faithful gathered for Yom Kippur.As Episcopalians, we write to express our outrage and our grief at this attack, and our commitment to continue teaching within our churches about the dangers of intolerance and the evils of extremism and racism in all its forms.We follow the teachings of a man who was a Jewish teacher and preacher. In the calendar of our year, we mark events in the life of that man reflecting his Jewish upbringing and piety.We are also keenly aware of the long and grievous history of the church in denying its historic connection to the Jewish people, and in failing to speak with moral clarity when Jewish communities have been singled out for discrimination and violence.We condemn all violence perpetrated against people and communities of faith, and we stand unalterably in support of the rights of all people to exercise the dictates of their conscience without fear. We will not fail to remind our communities of the profound errors of the past, when the church made easy alliance with the evils of white supremacy and nationalism. And we assure our Jewish neighbors and friends of our prayers, our support, and our assistance.The Reverend Dr. Lutz AckermannVicar, Mission of Saint Boniface, AugsburgThe Reverend Christopher EasthillRector, Church of Saint Augustine of Canterbury, WiesbadenThe Reverend Hanns EngelhardtMission of Saint Columban, KarlsruheThe Reverend Scott A. MooreVicar, Mission of Saint James the Less, NürnbergThe Reverend Allan SandlinInterim Rector, Church of the Ascension, MunichThe Reverend. Dr. Edda WolffInterim Rector, Church of Christ the King, FrankfurtThe Venerable Walter J. BaerArchdeaconThe Convocation Episcopal Churches in EuropeThe Right Reverend Mark D. W. EdingtonBishop in ChargeThe Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter April 16, 2017 at 9:53 pm From the History ChannelEaster, which celebrates Jesus Christ’s resurrection from the dead, is Christianity’s most important holiday. It has been called a moveable feast because it doesn’t fall on a set date every year, as most holidays do. Instead, Christian churches in the West celebrate it on the first Sunday following the full moon after the vernal equinox on March 21. Therefore, Easter is observed anywhere between March 22 and April 25 every year. Orthodox Christians use the Julian calendar to calculate when it will occur and typically celebrate the holiday a week or two after the Western churches, which follow the Gregorian calendar.The exact origins of this religious feast day’s name are unknown. Some sources claim the word Easter is derived from Eostre, a Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility. Other accounts trace it to the Latin term hebdomadal alba, or white week, an ancient reference to Easter week and the white clothing donned by people who were baptized during that time. Through a translation error, the term later appeared as esostarum in Old High German, which eventually became Easter in English. In Spanish, it is known as Pascua; in French, Paques. These words are derived from the Greek and Latin Pascha or Pasch, for Passover. Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection occurred after he went to Jerusalem to celebrate Passover (or Pesach in Hebrew), the Jewish festival commemorating the ancient Israelites’ exodus from slavery in Egypt. Pascha eventually came to mean Easter.Easter is really an entire season of the Christian church year, as opposed to a single-day observance. Lent, the 40-day period leading up to Easter Sunday, is a time of reflection and penance and represents the 40 days that Jesus spent alone in the wilderness before starting his ministry, a time in which Christians believe he survived various temptations by the devil. The day before Lent, known as Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday, is the last hurrah of food and fun before the fasting begins. The week preceding Easter is called Holy Week and includes Maundy Thursday, which commemorates Jesus’ last supper with his disciples; Good Friday, which honors the day of his crucifixion; and Holy Saturday, which focuses on the transition between the crucifixion and resurrection. The 50-day period following Easter Sunday is called Eastertide and includes a celebration of Jesus’ ascension into heaven.The Holy Fire ceremony in Jerusalem takes place on Holy Saturday at the Holy Sepulcher Church. The ceremony is held in the rotunda of the Church around the Tomb of Christ.In addition to Easter’s religious significance, it also has a commercial side, as evidenced by the mounds of jelly beans and marshmallow chicks that appear in stores each spring. As with Christmas, over the centuries various folk customs and pagan traditions, including Easter eggs, bunnies, baskets and candy, have become a standard part of this holy holiday.For the complete article, go here. I am sitting here thinking about Easters in the past and I remember how my parents would always buy me a new dress for Easter Sunday from the time I was little. When we moved here to Apopka I was 14 and a half years old the June that we moved here, so the following spring I was 15, and we went over to K-Mart on West Colonial and my father gave me a twenty dollar bill to buy myself a new Easter dress. I picked out one that I just loved and went to the dressing room and tried it on and put my twenty dollar bill up on the ledge, and was turning all around looking in the mirror. Well, I flew out of there and went running to hunt down my parents to show them my Easter dress, and as we headed to the cash register together……. uh oh! I had left the twenty dollar bill on the ledge and ran back to the dressing room and it was gone. My daddy didn’t yell at me, didn’t whip me when we got home, or even lecture me about it, but I felt so bad! He paid for it at the register anyway, and wasn’t even mad at me. I will never forget that! I was blessed to have the parents I had. Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Reply Mama Mia Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 center_img Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom 1 COMMENT TAGSEaster Previous articleWork dragging you down?Next articleEaster falls on a Sunday this Year? Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 last_img read more