Category :csbamcga

first_imgNadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil MOST READ While the 31-year-old out of Team Lakay is aware that Fernandes, the man he defeated for the belt, is eager for the win, but he knows he needs to be hungrier than his Brazilian opponent.“The Bibi I faced in my previous fight is the same Bibi I will face again but I won’t ever underestimate his skills because he’s that good of a fighter,” said Belingon (20-5) Thursday at Gloria Maris in Gateway during Team Lakay’s media lunch.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubs“I’ll train hard for this fight because I know he’s really hungry coming into the fight but I am hungrier than him. I’m hungrier for that victory.”Belingon had been on a six-fight winning streak since he lost to Fernandes in their first fight back in January of 2016 and this string of victories set up their second fight on November 9, 2018 at Singapore Indoor Stadium. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next History is within Team Lakay’s reach with 3 fighters featured in 1st ONE Japan card Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief LATEST STORIES Kevin Belingon. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—It is said that familiarity breeds contempt, but for Kevin Belingon it creates hunger.Belingon is set to fight rival Biniano Fernades for the third time in his career but this time it’s the defense of his ONE World bantamweight championship.ADVERTISEMENT It was a split decision win for Belingon but it was still a stinging loss to Fernandes (22-4), who hadn’t lost a fight since December of 2010 and had ruled the ONE Championship bantamweight division since 2013.Belingon said he has a different mindset coming into his third fight against Fernandez when he still entered the ring as the challenger.“Now I’m the champion and of course I’m always motivated because I’m the one holding the title,” said Belingon. “To remain as the champion I have to train hard and be at my best.”ADVERTISEMENT Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold PLAY LIST 06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold03:00SEA Games 2019: PH’s Aira Villegas boxing bantamweight semi final (HIGHLIGHTS)03:11SEA Games 2019: PH’s Ian Bautista boxing bantamweight semi final (HIGHLIGHTS)02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebralast_img read more

first_imgAs US oil giant ExxonMobil continues exploration in the Stabroek Block offshore Guyana, the company reported that its Skipjack well did not yield “commercial quantities of hydrocarbons”, according to the Natural Resources Ministry.The Ministry in a statement said ExxonMobil and the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission (GGMC) informed authorities that on August 29, 2016 the well proved not to have commercial quantities of hydrocarbons.“We are continuing to have verification work done and awaiting a full report and more information will be provided then. This announcement reminded us of the undulating fortunes of mining in general and of oil exploration in particular,” the Ministry’s statement said.The Stena Carron: Drilling ahead of Liza 3 offshore Guyana (Upstream photo)ExxonMobil, the statement continued, will continue with plans to develop the Liza well with its declared capacity of approximately one billion barrels and also look for other possible targets for drilling.“Likewise, the Government continues its preparations for the eventual production of oil and gas in the near future by building capacity at the legislative, technical and regulatory levels,” the statement continued.Efforts to contact ExxonMobil’s local manager, Jeff Simmons, proved futile, as Guyana Times was told he was out of the office. However, sections of the local media quoted Simmons as confirming that indeed the Skipjack well did not turn up the results expected.International oil and gas newspaper, Upstream quoted ExxonMobil sources who confirmed that the company failed to hit commercial hydrocarbons at the Skipjack exploration well, where the super major was targeting similar conditions to its massive Liza oil find of between 800 million and 1.4 billion barrels of oil equivalent.The US super major confirmed reports from Upstream sources that Skipjack, which was spud on July 17, was a dry hole.The company did not detail if there were any hydrocarbon shows during the drilling.Sources familiar with the geology in the vast Guyana-Suriname basin called the Skipjack prospect a geological lookalike to Liza, reiterating comments previously made by executives at ExxonMobil’s partner Hess that the Stabroek Block contained potentially more than 20 structures with similar attributes as Liza.The Stena Carron drillship is on location at the Liza 3 appraisal well after drilling Skipjack 40 kilometres to the north-west of Liza.ExxonMobil spud Liza 3 on September 4 and, like its predecessor Liza 2, the well will focus on testing the flank of the Liza structure to determine the aerial extent of the reservoir.Liza 2 hit more than 190 feet of net pay and caused ExxonMobil, along with partners Hess and CNOOC subsidiary Nexen, to boost their estimate of the recoverable oil in place at Liza.In July, ExxonMobil submitted a development plan for Liza to Guyana’s Environmental Protection Agency to begin the environmental review process.That plan calls for a pair of rigs to drill development wells from two drill centres, each with a corresponding water injection site to the east. Production will be sent to an FPSO with capacity of around 100,000 barrels of oil per day.Under that plan, first production from the field would come online sometime in 2020 or as late as 2021.last_img read more

first_img…as frustration grows over bank, cambio shortages…Govt maintains scarcity contrivedBoth Finance Minister Winston Jordan and Governor of the Central Bank of Guyana, Dr. Gobind Ganga, are maintaining that there is no shortage of foreign currencies in Guyana.Dr. Ganga has said that despite stern warnings from authorities, businesses are suspected to be hoarding foreign currencies, and commercial banks and cambios are claim shortages in order to cause customers to resort to paying exorbitant rates for foreign currencies, even purchasing elsewhere in light of the contrived scarcity.And Finance Minister Winston Jordan recently announced on a radio programme that the Central Bank has no record of shortages at commercial banks. “The Governor has assured me that he doesn’t know anything about that, because the banks haven’t approached him for foreign exchange,” Jordan stated on the radio programme.Usually, when commercial banks experience a shortage, they turn to the Bank of Guyana to purchase the currency to meet the demands.Jordan recently announced that the foreign exchange reserves at the Bank of Guyana are in excess of US$600 million, but commercial banks and cambios across the country continue to turn away customers, claiming a shortage of the US dollar; and based on the findings of this newspaper’s investigations, popular cambios are turning away regular patrons who are interested in purchasing foreign currencies. This has resulted in businesspersons and the average Guyanese being forced to buy foreign currencies at exploitative rates.Around the city, money changers have already raised their rates for the US dollar to G$220, although the rate currently hovers at G$210.HoardingDuring the mentioned radio programme, the Finance Minister said he believes there is a deliberate attempt to starve the economy of foreign currencies.Junior Finance Minister Jaipaul Sharma has also opined that commercial banks and cambios are hoarding foreign currencies in order to get better prices from preferred markets.He told Guyana Times on Saturday: “Maybe they tell the customers ‘no’ so they could get a higher rate. Maybe they are keeping it for some friend or some special customer.”Nonetheless, he does not believe the situation warrants a probe. According to the Junior Finance Minister, Government cannot control what the commercial banks and cambios tell their customers.QuestionsQuestions are now being raised about why commercial banks and cambios are turning away local customers interesting in purchasing US currency, and why the banks and cambios are not informing the Central Bank if they claim a shortage exists.Sharma explained that the only way Government can launch an investigation is if commercial banks visit the Central Bank with the supportive documents to prove they are experiencing a shortage but are being denied opportunity to purchase foreign currencies.The Junior Finance Minister emphasised that no commercial bank has visited the Central Bank claiming a shortage.WarningGovernment had signalled its intention to move sternly against businesses hoarding foreign currencies, because such a practice has the potential to destabalise the economy.Jordan contemplates the possibility that hoarding is being practised in order to create depreciation in domestic currency.He also noted that some exporters and importers are conducting mutual foreign exchange transactions outside of the exchange market structure.last_img read more

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Soccer Club will be hosting not one, but two camps later on this summer.The Vikes Soccer Camp will be taking place later this month, and will feature the UVic Vikes varsity squad offering a highly instructional camp. The camp runs July 25th – 29th from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Surerus Soccer Field and Dr. Kearney School and is open to players born 1998-2007 inclusive. The camp costs $175 per player, and registration closes on July 15th.Earlier this month, the club announced that it will be hosting a camp put on by Soccer Alberta at Surerus Fields in August.- Advertisement -To register for the Vikes camp, visit: http://www.fsjsoccer.com/register-online.html.last_img read more

first_imgJimmy Floyd Hasselbaink claims Chelsea striker Diego Costa looks a different player to the one who tore apart Europe last season.The Spain striker has taken the Premier League by storm this campaign, following a move to Stamford Bridge last summer, but has failed to score in all 7 of his Champions League appearances.Jose Mourinho’s side crashed out of the tournament on Wednesday night, after a 2-2 draw with PSG in south west London, and the former Atletico Madrid striker was involved in a bust-up with Yohan Cabaye at the final whistle.And ex-Blues favourite Hasselbaink believes the 26-year-old has failed to shine in Europe’s premier competition.“Diego Costa needs space behind the defence, that’s where he’s at his best,” he told the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast show. “The Champions League is another level to the Premier League though.“Last year he had that space when playing for Atletico Madrid, but this campaign he hasn’t looked as good in Europe as when he’s playing in the Premier League.”last_img read more

first_imgAn avid fisherman recently made an annual return to Clear Lake and wound up reeling in a potential all-tackle world record.Vacaville native and chiropractor Sean Moffett was fishing for trophy bass on his boat Saturday morning accompanied by his wife Stacy to celebrate their 29th wedding anniversary.Instead of a monster bass, however, he unexpectedly caught a mammoth catfish that was far too big for his 18-inch net. “I saw the tail come out of the water and it was a dinosaur,” Moffett said. …last_img read more

first_imgWhy engineer things from scratch, when we can imitate nature?  Two recent examples come from the world of insects.  A press release from UC Berkeley begins, “Using the eyes of insects such as dragonflies and houseflies as models, a team of bioengineers at University of California, Berkeley, has created a series of artificial compound eyes.”  (Emphasis added in all quotes.)  Insect eyes use thousands of facets to get a wide field of view without distortion.  How can humans use this technology?  “Potential applications include surveillance; high-speed motion detection; environmental sensing; medical procedures, such as endoscopies and image-guided surgeries, that require cameras; and a number of clinical treatments that can be controlled by implanted light delivery devices.”  Anyone who has missed swatting a fly knows that the insects have these first three applications down pat.  The authors published their work in Science this week.1    Human committees have a hard time arriving at a consensus about what is the best solution to a problem.  Maybe they should learn from bees.  Ten thousand of them swarming chaotically somehow converge quickly on a solution to the problem of the best location for a new hive.  A press release from Cornell University says that “they have a unique method of deciding which site is right: With great efficiency they narrow down the options and minimize bad decisions.”  How?  By coalition building till a quorum develops, the article explains.  The scientists found that bees use their famous “waggle dance” not only when shopping for food, but when scouting for real estate.  The researchers watched 4,000 scouts report back to the hive from various directions.  The superior site usually was not the first one chosen.  In a 16-hour process, the swarm came to agreement and found the best solution.  “This is a striking example of decision making by an animal group that is complicated enough to rival the dealings of any department committee,”  said Thomas Seeley, Cornell biologist.  What can managers take home from this nature lesson?  Include an open forum of ideas, and employ frank discussions and friendly competition.  This quorum-setting method of aggregating independent opinions might help “achieve collective intelligence and thus avoid collective folly.”1Jeong et al., “Biologically Inspired Artificial Compound Eyes,” Science, 28 April 2006: Vol. 312. no. 5773, pp. 557 – 561, DOI: 10.1126/science.1123053.Funny, honey; none of these articles mentioned evolution, but they seemed to have no problem using the word design.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_img“It will be an exciting meeting,” World Economic Forum founder Klaus Schwab said of the organisation’s 2014 annual Davos gathering, at a news conference on Wednesday 15 January. “It will be different from last year’s, because it will not be overshadowed by one single crisis.”Schwab characterised the context of the 2014 meeting by three things: cautious optimism, diminished expectations, and many known unknowns.Watch the full 56-minute pre-meeting press conference here:last_img

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest One of the requirements for the registration of XtendiMAx, Engenia, and FeXapan is the investigation of any non-performance (ineffective control) by the respective companies, which then has to be reported to the U.S. EPA. The goal of this reporting is apparently to try to track the development of resistance as soon as it occurs in a few fields, which would then allow time to modify practices so that the rate of resistance in other fields is slowed.  We encourage growers and consultants to take the time to scout for non-performance, within 14 days after application according to information from labels. Problems with control can be reported to the three companies via online sites or toll-free numbers as follows, or directly to company representatives.Monsanto (XtendiMax) – 1-844-RRXTENDBASF (Engenia) – www.Non-Performance.BASF.USDuPont (FeXapan) – 1-888-6-DUPONTProblems with off-target movement from spray particle drift or vapor drift (volatility) can be reported to the three companies the same way. We would encourage growers experiencing these problems to contact the companies or their representatives, but unlike non-performance, they are not required to investigate and report these to the USEPA. Given that these problems are usually the result of not following label guidelines or appropriate application practices, the primary contact would be the Ohio Department of Agriculture. Contact the ODA Pesticide and Fertilizer Regulation Section at 614-728-6987.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Four Ohioans who have committed their lives to working in, promoting and advocating for Ohio’s farm community were honored Friday, Aug. 2, by the Ohio Agricultural Council (OAC), when they were inducted into the Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame.The Ohio Agricultural Council (OAC) inducted Bryan Black of Canal Winchester, Charles A. “Al” Holdren of Ashland, Lewis R. Jones of Grove City and Robinson “Rob” W. Joslin of Sidney, into the Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame during a special breakfast ceremony held in Kasich Hall at the Ohio State Fair. The 54th annual event will attract more than 600 guests to honor these four professionals for their lifetime of service and dedication to Ohio’s agriculture community.“This is a very special class of inductees, and I am so pleased to recognize their expansive contributions to Ohio agriculture,” said Hinda Mitchell, OAC President. “With representation from state agencies to agribusiness to those who spent their lives working a farm, our 2019 inductees have given of their time, talent and leadership to advance the interests of Ohio agriculture and to serve our farm community with distinction.”The following four inductees will join 229 prior recipients named since 1966 when the program was incepted. Bryan Black — Canal Winchester, OhioA true advocate for Ohio agriculture, Bryan Black has spent decades investing in the future of the industry, on the county, state and national levels. Starting in 1980, Black partnered with his father, Ned, and brother, Barry to manage Ned Black & Sons LLC — a 600-acre grain and livestock farm — and serving as its owner since 2008. In addition, Black has worked for Kalmbach Swine Management for seven years, serving as the production supervisor to select maternal females for internal replacement and external sales.From the early stages of his career, Black has served on numerous committees and boards for the good of the industry. As a National Pork Producers Council board member, Black was instrumental in guiding the industry through trade disputes, increasing pork consumption in school lunches and fostering relationships with allied industry members. Black served as a president of the NPPC and was also a National Pork Board committee member. In Ohio, Black is an Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board Member, developing swine standards for the board, and has served as a member and president of the Ohio Pork Council.Black has been recognized with numerous industry awards, including National Pork Producers Council All-American, National Pork Board’s Environmental Stewardship Award for Ohio and Ohio Pork Industry Excellence Award. Charles A. “Al” Holdren — Ashland, OhioA pillar in the cooperative community, Charles A. “Al” Holdren has always had the ability to make “work” seem like “fun.” Holdren began his cooperative journey with management training at Fayette Landmark, before transitioning to the CEO at Ottawa Landmark. He seasoned many company changes and mergers, landing as the CEO of Town & Country Co-op. Holdren served as CEO for 26 years, retiring in 2017 after leading the merger of Western Reserve Farm Cooperative to form today’s Centerra Co-op.In his cooperative career, Holdren committed his company to improving the industry. He established the annual Ladies Luncheon to recognize and honor the never-ending work of women on the farm and female employees of Town & Country Co-op. He also worked with CEOs from other cooperatives in Ohio to form Cooperatives for the Cure to raise cancer research funds though initiatives like Fueling the Cure and Growing the Cure. He also has a passion for student scholarships, working tirelessly to raise funds for students in Ohio and abroad.Holdren was a member of the OSU LEAD II class and was recognized as its Distinguished Alumni in 2006. He has also been recognized by the Ohio AgriBusiness Association as the Golf for Scholarships Honoree for his scholarship efforts. Lewis R. Jones — Grove City, OhioLewis R. Jones is a constant fixture at the Ohio State Fair, having dedicated his life to the betterment of Ohio agriculture, with a special focus on the dairy sector and a passion for youth development. In his decorated career, Jones has served the Ohio Department of Agriculture in numerous positions, including Weights and Measures Division Chief, Dairy Division Chief and Deputy Director. Jones has also served the industry as executive secretary of the Ohio Milk Haulers Association and the American Guernsey Association.In his capacity as Dairy Division Chief, Jones was tasked to establish new show-ring ethics for fairs across the state, utilizing his vast industry experience to implement protocols used at the World Dairy Expo. He also instituted the practice of collecting and testing milk samples at the Ohio State Fair to demonstrate federally-expected dairy inspecting and sanitation procedures.Jones continues to give back to his alma matter, The Ohio State University, through scholarships. He is an alumnus of Alpha Gamma Sigma Fraternity. In 2011 was inducted into the Ohio Dairy Hall of Service, selected by the Department of Animal Sciences and in 2017, recognized as a Distinguished Alumni of the OSU College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. As an Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame inductee, Jones follows in the footsteps of his father, Rueben, who received the honor in 1990. Robinson “Rob” W. Joslin — Sidney, OhioAnyone who spent time with Robinson “Rob” W. Joslin enjoyed his enthusiasm and true dedication to agriculture, evident in everything he put forth. A full-time farmer for 40 years and true family man, Joslin worked nearly every day beside his wife, Ellen. Joslin was always an “early adopter” of new farm technologies, realizing the value of new practices and implementing them on his farm. For more than 25 years, Joslin’s operation was dedicated to conservation tillage and 100% no-till.With farm roots well planted in Shelby County, Joslin gave much time to its betterment. He was an active member of the Shelby County Farm Bureau, served on the Shelby County OSU Extension advisory committee and was a 4-H adviser for 20 years. Joslin also served as a trustee on his local township zoning board for more than 20 years, to help plan housing developments and industrial parks that would provide the least interference with the local agricultural community.Joslin was also dedicated to improving the industry outside his county, serving both the Ohio Soybean Association and American Soybean Association. During his time as ASA President, and after, Joslin lobbied on behalf of farmers before Congress on important policy issues like trade, conservation, sustainability and more. After his untimely passing in 2016, Joslin was posthumously bestowed with the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Soybean Association.last_img read more