Archives : Sep-2019

LeBron James – The man once mockingly referred to as “LeBronze” following some disappointing some initial international experiences says he wants to add to his gold medal collection.NBA star LeBron James says he’s all in and would relish the opportunity to wear the red, white and blue for the third consecutive Olympics when the Rio Games come around in 2016. James, who was the best player on the American team that won the gold medal at the recently completed London Olympics, will be 31 by the time the next Olympiad arrives, but said he would relish the opportunity to again represent his country.James has yet to formally notify USA Basketball of his intentions, but there will always be room on any U.S. team for the unquestioned best player in the world.The London Olympics were the year’s coup-de-grace for James, who joined some rarified air when he followed icon Michael Jordan as the only players to ever be named the league MVP and win NBA and Olympic championships in the same year.It was the second consecutive gold medal for James, who had helped lead Team USA to gold at the Beijing Games in 2008. His last two experiences marked a far cry from his first in the 2004 Athens Games and the subsequent 2006 World Championships that saw the U.S. finish a disappointing third on both occasions.James was unstoppable in London, averaging 16.3 points, 4.8 rebounds and a team-high 5.6 assists. He totaled 19 points on 8-of-13 shooting while adding seven boards and a team-best four assists in the gold medal victory over Spain. He was even more spectacular in the days before, registering the first triple double in U.S. Olympic history with 11 points, 14 rebounds and 12 assists in the quarterfinal victory over Australia. read more

Royce White, the Houston Rockets’ first-round draft pick, is away from the team and says the club has been ”inconsistent” in its agreement to help him cope with his anxiety disorder.The 6-foot-8 White, the 16th overall pick in the 2012 draft, made a deal with the team to travel by bus to some games this season, so he could confront his fear of flying and obsessive compulsive disorder over the long term. He flew with the team to its season opener in Detroit, then traveled by bus to games at Atlanta and Memphis.He was not with the team for Monday’s home game against Miami and also missed Tuesday’s practice.”In hindsight, perhaps it was not a good idea to be open and honest about my anxiety disorder – due to the current situations at hand that involve the nature of actions from the Houston Rockets,” White said in a statement released by his publicist Tuesday night. ”As a rookie, I want to settle into a team and make progress; but since preseason, the Rockets have been inconsistent with their agreement to proactively create a healthy and successful relationship.”Houston general manager Daryl Morey also released a statement on Tuesday night, saying White ”is not available right now. We are committed to his long term success and we will continue to support him now and going forward.”White’s off-the-court issues were never a secret, but the Rockets felt as though he was worth the risks. In one spectacular season at Iowa State, he became the only Division I player to lead his team in scoring (13.4 points per game), rebounds (9.3 per game), assists (five per game), steals (1.2 per game) and blocks (0.9 per game) and led the Cyclones to their first NCAA tournament appearance in seven years.He missed the first week of training camp, though, to meet with the Rockets about creating an arrangement that he felt would help him balance his anxiety disorder with the demands of the NBA schedule. White said on his Twitter account Tuesday that he is ”most defiantly not AWOL” and that the team is aware of the reason for his current absence.”Any other response is inaccurate,” he said in his statement. ”This is important to me, it is a health issue. I must advocate for my rights, it is a player-commodity league – the failure to meet my requests for support will end with me being unhealthy and that is not a consequence that I am willing to accept to play any sport.”The Rockets play New Orleans on Wednesday night at the Toyota Center. Coach Kevin McHale has also been away from the team since taking a leave of absence on Saturday to return home to Minnesota and deal with a family matter.http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=espn:8460068 read more

Minnesota Vikings rookie Cordarrelle Patterson has set the NFL record for longest kickoff return, a 109-yard touchdown to start the game against Green Bay.The entire length of an NFL field is 120 yards, including both end zones. The field of play is 100 yards with each end zone extending an extra 10 yards at either end. Patterson was as far back as he could be in the end zone when he caught the opening kick from Tim Masthay on Sunday night. He needed a full 12 seconds to evade 11 would-be tacklers and reach the far end of the field.The rookie wide receiver gave the Minnesota Vikings to an instant 7-0 lead over the Green Bay Packers for his second kickoff return touchdown of the season. He set a new record for the longest kickoff return in NFL history, three players shared the previous record of 108 yards: Ellis Hobbs for New England in 2007, Randall Cobb for Green Bay in 2011, and Jacoby Jones for Baltimore in 2012.Despite the Patterson record-breaking run, Green Bay still managed to come out on top beating the Vikings 44-31. read more

More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (March 14, 2017), we’re in full-fledged March madness after the release of NCAA Tournament match-ups, breaking down the women’s and men’s brackets and pondering whether the men’s East region is the death bracket it seems to be. Next, we’re joined by ESPN The Magazine’s Mina Kimes, who explains the latest offseason movement in the NFL as free agency gets underway. Plus, a significant digit on hockey.VIDEO: Our picks for bracket success FiveThirtyEight Links to what we discussed:Filling out a bracket? FiveThirtyEight’s 2017 March Madness predictions are live.The road to the NCAA championship is tougher for the UConn women’s basketball team than it has been in the past few years, writes FiveThirtyEight’s Benjamin Morris.FiveThirtyEight’s staff previewed all regions in the men’s competition.The Ringer’s Mark Titus takes a look at the reasons for optimism, excitement and uncontrollable anger at the beginning of the tournament.Join Hot Takedown’s bracket challenge over at ESPN.SB Nation takes a look at the top stories of the NFL offseason.ESPN’s Dan Graziano breaks down the best NFL free-agent deals.Significant Digit: 217, the number of minutes that a game of hockey lasted in Norway this week, setting a new record for longest-ever match. The game had eight overtimes and took more than eight hours to play. Embed Code read more

October brings falling leaves, great postseason pitching and hitting, and painfully long baseball games. Look no further than Game 2 of the World Series: On the game’s biggest national stage, the Cubs and Indians played a 5-1 game Wednesday night that took four hours and four minutes to complete. Interminable games like Wednesday’s contest are the norm for the MLB postseason — but even by that standard, this year has been by far the slowest in recent memory.Baseball usually reserves its longest games for October, with the average game length jumping precipitously in the final month of each of the past five seasons. But even keeping that in mind, this year has been extraordinary: The last 27 games have featured an average game length of three hours and 24 minutes, the highest average for any continuous block of 27 games in the past five years (and far above the overall 2016 season average of three hours, two minutes). The only block of games that even comes close to the one we’re in now came in 2014 — and 2014 was before baseball commissioner Rob Manfred announced new rules designed to speed up the games. That this year’s games are surpassing the heights of 2014 even with those pace-of-play rules in place is extraordinary.There are a number of contributors to baseball’s recent sluggishness, including instant replay reviews, reliever usage and pitcher pace. Managers are using replay-review challenges more aggressively in the postseason, averaging more than one per game, in comparison with the regular season average of 0.6 per game. Replay challenges take about 96 seconds each1According to data from Retrosheet on regular-season replay challenges., so the additional challenges are probably only adding a little less than a minute to the bloated postseason average.Reliever usage is probably a larger factor. As I documented in a recent piece, managers are asking more relievers to chew up a greater fraction of the innings this postseason than ever before. So far this postseason, there have been 4.06 relief appearances per game, compared with a regular season average of 3.14 per game. Each pitching change can take up to two minutes and 30 seconds, so pitcher usage accounts for another two- to three-minute chunk of the sluggish pace.Relievers themselves also slow the pace of the game. Relief pitchers take much more time between pitches — about 1.7 seconds more per throw — than starters do. Combine that leisurely tempo with the fact that relievers are being used more so far this postseason — about 14 more pitches are thrown by the bullpen per game — and we’ve accounted for another 25 or so extra seconds per game.Speaking of slow pitching pace, by far the worst offender this year was the Los Angeles Dodgers’ bullpen. At 25.9 seconds per pitch, Dodgers relievers were 0.3 seconds slower between pitches than the second-place team (the Boston Red Sox, who also made it to the playoffs), 3.3 seconds slower — per pitch, mind you! — than their NLCS opponent, the Cubs, and 2.2 seconds slower than the AL champion Indians.2A significant fraction of that was probably due to L.A. middle reliever Pedro Baez, whose astounding 30.2 seconds per pitch pace was highest in the league. Fans and announcers complain about replay challenges and pitching changes, but combined they probably have less impact on game length than specific teams (like the Dodgers) do.So after the Cubs advanced over L.A. in the NLCS, it was fair to think that the strongest influence on this postseason’s slow games was out of the race, and that we might see snappier baseball in the World Series as a result. But despite the Cubs and Indians being two relatively fast-paced teams, the World Series has featured two of the longest games of the postseason, each with relatively little offense and only nine innings. There’s a big chunk of this postseason slowdown that doesn’t seem to be due to relievers, or replay, or pace. Maybe it’s the drama of the moment or the potential to break a title drought, but baseball games now take longer than at any point in recent memory. read more

Noah West celebrates with Gavin Lyon following scoring a run during the two’s days in Little League for the Westerville Warhawks. Credit: Courtesy of Carrie WestComing from a small town and being counted on to play a varsity sport is not an easy task to ask of anyone. It can be a very challenging transition.But freshmen baseball players Noah West and Gavin Lyon have something that can help make that transition much easier — a friendship dating back to the days of Little League.And, as West noted, having his best friend by his side to begin his collegiate baseball career at Ohio State proved to be very advantageous for the pair.“Coming into here, I was pretty nervous; it was really nerve-wracking,” West said. “A whole new set of players who we were playing with, and we don’t know them that well. But coming here with Gavin is basically a comfort zone. He’s always had my back, and if something’s going on, I can always come talk to him. It was always just a lot easier coming here with him.”They first started playing with each other when they were on a travel team called the Westerville Warhawks. Their fathers had been good friends and both helped coach the team. From there, they would continue to grow up and play at every level together from Little League to the varsity at their school, Westerville Central High School.For their former high-school baseball coach, Jeff Keifer, it has been a remarkable thing to watch the two of them grow up together and now both play at the highest level of amateur baseball.“They went on spring trips together. They played on the same travel teams growing up and then eventually playing on practice teams and ultimately junior varsity and varsity for three years,” Keifer said. “And that in and of itself must be incredibly special — just to be able to do that. But the uniqueness of them both being able to go on and play at the next level at a place with the storied history of Ohio State, it was just great for both of them.”Both have made it to the level of college baseball, but each took different paths.West, the youngest of three brothers, has grown up in a baseball family and has always had the sport in the forefront of his mind. Coach Keifer, who coached both West’s older brothers in high school, had figured for a long time Noah was going to be able to move on to the next level.“He just had that special athleticism that makes the difference between just a really good high-school player and a college athlete,” Keifer said.OSU baseball coach Greg Beals thought West had the skills to live up to the high expectations that come with playing shortstop at OSU.“I thought Noah showed me that between his hands, his athleticism and especially his arm strength that he could stay at shortstop at the college level,” Beals said.Noah West (left) and Gavin Lyon (right) pose for a photo on a visit at an Ohio State football game. Credit: Courtesy of Carrie WestLyon was a multi-sport athlete in high school, serving as both a starting pitcher for the baseball team and as starting quarterback for the football team. There was a time when baseball was not necessarily the runaway first sport for Lyon.“I was kind of new to baseball,” Lyon admits. “I’ve always loved both, but baseball especially through high school became the one, that I knew was going to be the one that I wanted to pursue further.”But as he continued on his high school career, Lyon became more enamored with the game of baseball and his coach said that it had probably surpassed football as his favorite sport by the time he was a senior.Though he now only plays the one sport, Lyon still possesses that athleticism that made him such an exciting player to watch. Coach Beals believes it is really special when you see someone who can excel in two sports the way Lyon did at Westerville Central.“It speaks to his athleticism,” Beals said. “To be able to quarterback at a big high school like that and then also be the No. 1 pitcher on his high school team speaks a lot about his athleticism.”When it finally came time to commit to a school, West was the first to submit a pledge to coach Beals and the OSU program. And at that point, it quickly became an easier decision for Lyon to decide to join the OSU baseball team. The prospect of playing baseball together for four more years with his best friend seemed too good an offer to pass up.“Noah visited first and he committed, so I committed a little later, but there was always that thing where Noah was pushing me to commit,” Lyon said. “We had always been thinking about it, like how cool would that be, and it really was like a dream come true when it all came into place.”For West, it was just a dream, one that somehow became fact rather than fiction.“I just never thought it would be possible to play baseball with my best friend all the way through high school,” he said. read more

“I couldn’t hear anything,” he said. “Emotions were flying, and words can’t even describe how good that felt.” After suffering a rough first half, which included a pass interference call that led to a second PSU score, Torrence sought to redeem himself in the second half. The Buckeyes made adjustments at halftime to get back in the game. So did Torrence. “I just told myself, ‘I am just going to be more aggressive, and if you all throw anything into these flats or try and run any type of screens, it’s going to be a wrap for you,’” he said. “That was just my halftime adjustment for myself.” It worked. After senior captain Brian Rolle challenged his fellow defensive teammates on the sideline to make a big play, Torrence delivered. “That was big,” Rolle said. “I remember before that telling all the guys, ‘Who wants it? Who wants to be great?’ Sure enough, he picked the ball off and ran it back, and I told him, ‘That’s how you be great.’” The interception deflated the sinking Penn State offense and proved to be the difference in the game. Torrence’s score gave the Bucks a three-point lead, one they would not relinquish. “Those kinds of plays take games over,” said defensive tackle Dexter Larimore. “It hurts their offense and quarterback … It was big for momentum change. Tonight those made the difference.” One play. That’s all it takes to change the course of a game. The Penn State Nittany Lions realized that Saturday as they saw their 14-3 halftime lead quickly turn to a 38-14 pummeling by the No. 9-ranked Ohio State Buckeyes. With the Nittany Lions trailing by four points midway through the third quarter, it appeared that momentum was shifting toward the Buckeyes. Cornerback Devon Torrence helped continue the shift. Facing a second-and-nine from their own 37-yard line, Nittany Lions quarterback Matt McGloin dropped back to pass. As he fired short to his left, Torrence made a break for the ball and came away with it. “I just saw it and just jumped it,” Torrence said. “I think it was maybe a low throw and I had to kind of tip it to myself to put it into position for me to catch it.” Tipping the McGloin pass twice before securing the ball and returning it 34 yards for the go-ahead touchdown, Torrence turned a docile crowd of 105,466 into one of pure pandemonium in a matter of seconds. read more

Ohio State redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins runs around a Northwestern defender in the Big Ten Championship game on Dec. 1 in Indianapolis. Ohio State won the game 45-24. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorINDIANAPOLIS — No. 5 Ohio State had the momentum heading into the Big Ten Championship.Coming off a 62-39 win against then-No. 4 Michigan, the Buckeyes were clicking on all cylinders, with redshirt sophomore Dwayne Haskins leading the No. 2 pass offense in the country, with redshirt junior defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones and the defensive line providing consistent pressure, limiting success for opposing quarterbacks. But in the way of Ohio State’s 37th Big Ten championship was No. 21 Northwestern, a team that survived by playing opponents close, never winning or losing a game by more than 14 points, that limited opponents’ success in the passing game by playing a zone base defense, keeping pass plays in front of them. Ohio State became one of the victims of Northwestern football on Saturday, but came out with the largest win differential of any opponent the Wildcats have faced this season, recording the 45-24 victory and winning their 37th Big Ten title. Even without knowing what the College Football Playoff committee will decide for the Buckeyes moving forward, head coach Urban Meyer said the first focus was to get to the Big Ten Championship in the first place. “The ultimate prize is a National Championship. But you certainly can’t be in that discussion unless you win your conference,” Meyer said. “So our objective is to get to Indy, win in Indy, win the conference championship.”The Buckeyes never lost its lead in the entirety of the game, securing the victory on a 15-yard touchdown pass from Haskins to sophomore running back J.K. Dobbins in the fourth quarter. Haskins finished the game with 499 passing yards, breaking his own school record for single-game passing yards, while completing 82.9 percent of his passes. The redshirt sophomore quarterback threw five touchdowns with one interception, his eighth of the season. Haskins said that the players around him, whether it’s the offensive line or the wide receivers, provided him the opportunities to succeed. “The biggest thing was execution,” Haskins said. “And the thing I had to do was give the ball to playmakers and let them make the plays. I’m just the distributor. And we did a great job tonight.” After Ohio State had held a 24-7 halftime lead, Northwestern surged back, recording 14 unanswered points in the third quarter, bringing its deficit to three points after a 18-yard touchdown run for redshirt senior quarterback Clayton Thorson and a 2-yard pass from Thorson to junior super back Cameron Green. But sophomore defensive end Chase Young batted a pass up at the line of scrimmage in the third quarter, landing in the arms of redshirt junior cornerback Damon Arnette for one of three turnovers by the Ohio State defense, seemingly giving the game back to the Buckeyes. Even after a 29-yard touchdown pass from Haskins to freshman wide receiver Chris Olave bringing the Buckeyes’ lead to 10 heading into the fourth quarter, the Wildcats continued to stay in the game, with Thorson leading Northwestern on a 7-play, 76-yard drive ending with a 21-yard field goal early in the fourth quarter. Ohio State extended its lead on a 9-yard pass from Haskins to redshirt senior Johnnie Dixon, who led the team with seven catches for 129 yards. Even with the late game success defensively, Ohio State looked more like the defense that played against Maryland in the first quarter. After recording a three-and-out in its first drive, Northwestern junior running back John Moten IV found running room on the right side of the Ohio State defense, taking the ball 77 yards for the Wildcats’ first score of the game, the seventh play of 70 yards or more the Buckeyes have allowed this season. It seemed to click for the defensive line later in the game, with Ohio State recording eight tackles for loss, including five sacks. Young finished the game with three sacks and a forced fumble. Facing a quarterback that he considered to be an NFL pro-style quarterback, Young said he and the rest of the line got its game plan from defensive coordinator Greg Schiano. “Coach Schiano said we have to get after him. Ran certain blitzes to block the storm press,” Young said.  “And today, we just won. And we followed what Coach Schiano said and we got the win.” Pressure in the backfield led to turnovers in the first half. As he was hurried by junior linebacker Malik Harrison, Thorson heaved a ball down the sideline, testing Ohio State’s man coverage and one-on-one ability as many opponents have done prior. Redshirt freshman defensive back Shaun Wade brought in the ball for his third interception of the season. Wade said pressure, whether it’s from the linebackers or from the defensive line, is vital to the success of the pass defense as a whole. “When they do that, as DB’s, we should be getting picks or just going to get the ball to be honest,” Wade said. “Because they provide that for us, that pressure for us all the time.” Young also recorded a strip sack, easily moving through Northwestern senior left tackle Blake Hance and bringing Thorson down on his blind side. After breaking former Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson’s Big Ten record for most total yards in a single season in the first quarter, Haskins found redshirt senior wide receiver Terry McLaurin twice in the first half, recording a 16-yard score and a 42-yard score, breaking former Ohio State quarterback J.T. Barrett’s record for the most touchdowns in a single season. After a 2017 Big Ten Championship in which McLaurin brought in two catches for 92 yards, recording a touchdown, Haskins knew, with where they were playing, that the redshirt senior wide receiver would be an impact on Saturday. “This is where Terry grew up,” Haskins said. “Whenever he has an opportunity to come back and play in this stadium, he does it for his family, for each other, for our teammates. And he shows out and he did a great job today.” Dobbins, recording his ninth rushing touchdown of the season in the first quarter, led the Buckeyes in rushing with 68 yards on 17 carries, averaging four yards per rush. Haskins said the win against Northwestern in the Big Ten Championship is a perfect example of what he wants to remember about Ohio State and the season he’s had. “What’s so fantastic about this game is that I looked to my left, my right, and we’re all ready to go out there, make a play together and be trusting one another, trusting the coaches when they put us in that situation,” Haskins said. “And what better way to go out on a win today.” Ohio State’s postseason fate will be decided when the College Football Playoff selection committee releases its final rankings on Sunday at noon.Updated on Dec. 2 at 1:46 a.m. with quotes from players and coaches after Ohio State’s 45-24 win against Northwestern. read more

first_imgShe was accompanied by Head Groom Terry PendryCredit:Kelvin Bruce  The Queen wore silk scarf rather than a helmet for the rideCredit:Kelvin Bruce Horse-riding has been a lifelong passion for the Queen. She once said that it allows her to be “just another human being”. Surrounded by the animals from early childhood, she is said to have taken her first lesson when she was only three years old.She now spends most of her time at Windsor Castle, rather than Buckingham Palace in London.  The Queen riding HM The Queen accompanied by her Head Groom Terry Pendry Rides along rides along the Riverbank at Windsor castlecenter_img She may be just one month away from celebrating her 91st birthday, but the Queen has proved that age is no obstacle to her enjoying her favourite hobby. Pictured heading out on her pony along the bank of the River Thames on Monday, the monarch looked as comfortable as ever in the saddle.Opting for a scarf around her head rather than a helmet, the Queen appeared the picture of health. She is said to have always declined to wear a “hard hat” to ensure her hair stays in place for any royal appointments. The monarch had a brief brush with ill health over Christmas, when a heavy cold prevented her from attending church services at Sandringham.But she has looked relaxed and well in recent appearances, and appeared to be enjoying the spring air as she took to her pony alongside Windsor Castle Head Groom Terry Pendry. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

first_imgAt around 4.40pm, the Coastguard confirmed that all casualties had been “safely recovered” and all rescue teams were in the process of being stood down.  An Army spokesperson said:​ “We can confirm that all Army cadets caught in today’s inclement weather on the Mourne Mountains are safe and accounted for.”Last year, the Mourne Mountains were voted Britain’s best view in a survey.The jagged mountains form one of the backdrops to Game Of Thrones, the hit fantasy series.  The Coastguard said in a statement on Facebook that it had received requests for assistance after receiving “several reports that a large number of people were in difficulty after being caught out in inclement weather”.Coastguard, ambulance and helicopter crews launched an emergency mission shortly after midday. VIDEO: Reports of a large group of cadets in difficulty in the Mournes. Numerous emergency teams seen at Carrick Little, near Annalong. pic.twitter.com/rDamPaVjup— U105 (@U105radio) August 2, 2017 A major rescue mission was launched after dozens of Army cadets got into difficulties in poor weather while training in mountains in Northern Ireland.Sixty-three cadets aged between 12 and 17 as well as ten leaders had been camping in the Mourne Mountains, County Down.The group is said to have got into difficulties amid poor weather conditions on Wednesday morning. Mountain rescue The scene near Annalong in the Mourne Mountains in Co. Down where a number of young Army Cadets were taken off the mountains after getting into difficultiesCredit:presseye.com/Jonathan Porter A large emergency services operation was launched to get them off the mountainsCredit:PressEye.com/ Jonathan Porter Colin McGrath, an SDLP MLA, posted on Twitter: “Please God all will be ok.” Emergency workers at the base of the Mourne MountainsCredit:Press Eye A Mourne Mountain Rescue spokesman said they group has been “caught out” by the weather. The Coastguard said that a total of 73 people were evacuated from the mountains during the “large scale” operation.  Mountain rescue team at Carrick-Little car park near AnnalongCredit:Press Eye  Medical staff are reported to have treated several children at the scene, in the Annalong Valley,  and 16 of the group were later treated for hypothermia. A Mourne Mountain Rescue spokesman said only a small number of people required assistance – for ankle injuries from slipping on stones and exposure to the poor weather conditions.Young people from Middlesbrough were at their annual camp in Northern Ireland, carrying out adventure training and cultural visits. The Coastguard sent three rescue helicopters and three land-based teams to the scene. Police crews and the Mourne Mountain Rescue Service were also dispatched.The cadets were on a summer camp based at Ballykinlar, an old military camp in County Down. The scene near Annalong in the Mourne Mountains in Co. Down where a number of young Army Cadets were taken off the mountains after getting into difficulties Ken Johnston, the Ministry of Defence’s chief press officer in Northern Ireland, said that the evacuation was a “precautionary measure”.“They’ve been here for a number of days, undertakings adventure training and cultural visits. This morning they were on the Mourne Mountains nearby and we have had very bad weather,” he told The Daily Telegraph.  Mourne Mountains in Northern Ireland The Mourne Mountains were last year named Britain’s best viewCredit:Travel-pictures.co/PA A Northern Ireland Ambulance Service (NIAS) spokesperson  said: “Sixteen of the group are suffering from hypothermia and some with minor injuries. NIAS declared a major incident at 13:21.”An RRV, five Officers, a doctor, 10 A&E crews, a Hazardous Area Response Team and Mountain Rescue are in attendance at the scene. An A&E crew have set up at Annalong Community Hall to treat the walking wounded.” Major emergency incident in mournes with helicopter, coastguard, medical and ambulance responding. Please God all will be ok. @UTVNews— Colin McGrath (@ColinSDLP) August 2, 2017 Emergency workers at the base of the Mourne Mountains A large emergency services operation was launched to get them off the mountains “A small number of the cadets suffered ankle injuries, slipped on stones, and some were complaining of cold. So a decision was taken to withdraw.“We must admit that a huge support operation swung into help, we are very grateful to the police, search and rescue, and the ambulance service.“My understanding is now all the young people are now off the mountain and are being assessed.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more